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* A variation in ''VideoGame/DivinityOriginalSinII'' with "Sourcery", with a "u". This is because Source is a substance that has entered the realm of Rivellon via the rise of the Voidwoken, a HordeOfAlienLocusts, and the use of it tends to bring them to one's doorstep. It is also generated by [[spoiler:liquidating the spirits of the dead]], which is another reason why it's taboo in certain circles. There's traditional magic, spells, and abilities, but stronger ones require Source for use.


-->-- '''Chapter 5''', ''Discworld/AHatFullOfSky'' %%Slightly modified to remove in-line dialog tags, though the sentences are the same.

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-->-- '''Chapter 5''', ''Discworld/AHatFullOfSky'' ''Literature/AHatFullOfSky'' %%Slightly modified to remove in-line dialog tags, though the sentences are the same.



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* ''Webcomic/{{Housepets}}'' always refers to "magic(k)".

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyBraveExvius'': "Visionary Magick" refers to a class of magic born from scientific progress and far more powerful than the usual kind. The game's backstory tells of a civil war between two countries over the mastery of this kind of power which was deemed to dangerous to be employed.


->'''Tiffany''': Magic with a K? Magik''kkk''?
->'''Annagramma''': That's deliberate. Mrs. Earwig says that if we are to make any progress at all we ''must'' distinguish the higher [=MagiK=] from the everyday sort.

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->'''Tiffany''': Magic with a K? Magik''kkk''?
->'''Annagramma''':
Magik''kkk''?\\
'''Annagramma''':
That's deliberate. Mrs. Earwig says that if we are to make any progress at all we ''must'' distinguish the higher [=MagiK=] from the everyday sort.



* [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Likewise for]] ''{{Magicka}}''.

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* [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Likewise for]] ''{{Magicka}}''.''VideoGame/{{Magicka}}'': See the title.



[[folder: Web Comics ]]

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[[folder: Web Comics Webcomics ]]


Magick means, in fact, magic. "Magick" is an archaick spelling, dating back to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe Early Modern English]] where it appeared in the worcks of poets such as Edmund Spenser. Creator/AleisterCrowley revived this spelling to add an air of archaism, distinguishing "[[ThisIsReality actual]] [[WrongContextMagic magic]]" from [[StageMagician stage shows]]. UsefulNotes/{{Wicca}}ns and other Neo-Pagans, influenced by Crowley (to varying degrees), have picked up the Crowleyan spelling. Others use newer idiosyncratick spellings like "magique" and "majik." For whatever reason, this casual approach to spelling seems to have taken off in the mass media, especially things trying to be [[DarkerAndEdgier edgy]]. The constant misspelling of "magic" has been known to drive {{Grammar Nazi}}s up the wall, but it is reckommended you [[MST3KMantra don't worry about it too much]].

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Magick means, in fact, magic. "Magick" is an archaick spelling, dating back to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe Early Modern English]] Ænglisc]] where it appeared in the worcks of poets such as Edmund Spenser. Creator/AleisterCrowley revived this spelling to add an air of archaism, distinguishing "[[ThisIsReality actual]] [[WrongContextMagic magic]]" from [[StageMagician stage shows]]. UsefulNotes/{{Wicca}}ns and other Neo-Pagans, influenced by Crowley (to varying degrees), have picked up the Crowleyan spelling. Others use newer idiosyncratick spellings like "magique" and "majik." For whatever reason, this casual approach to spelling seems to have taken off in the mass media, especially things trying to be [[DarkerAndEdgier edgy]]. The constant misspelling of "magic" has been known to drive {{Grammar Nazi}}s up the wall, but it is reckommended you [[MST3KMantra don't worry about it too much]].


* [[{{Starflyer 59}} Starflyer 59's]] "Majic". At least on the vinyl version of ''Dial M'' (released by Burnt Toast Vinyl)--for some reason, every Tooth & Nail Records release of the song has "corrected" the spelling to "Magic". Jason Martin has clarified that "Majic" was the intended spelling. The J is for his father, John, who the song is about.

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* [[{{Starflyer 59}} Starflyer 59's]] Music/Starflyer59's "Majic". At least on the vinyl version of ''Dial M'' (released by Burnt Toast Vinyl)--for some reason, every Tooth & Nail Records release of the song has "corrected" the spelling to "Magic". Jason Martin has clarified that "Majic" was the intended spelling. The J is for his father, John, who the song is about.


* Creator/AleisterCrowley called his teachings "magick" in order to distinguish his "real" magic from "cheap parlor tricks". (He also added the K for numerological reasons, with lots of predictably sexual symbolism: the letter can stand for ''kteis'' [''κτείς''], ancient Greek for, among [[http://greek_english.enacademic.com/26352/%CE%BA%CF%84%CE%B5%CE%AF%CF%82 many other things]], "public hair", "penis", ''or'' "vagina" [ancient Greek was a confusing language]. Conveniently, it's also the eleventh letter of the alphabet and the number eleven is highly significant in his system of numerology.) He is in essence the originator of this trope, or at the very least, the popularizer of it.

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* Creator/AleisterCrowley called his teachings "magick" in order to distinguish his "real" magic from "cheap parlor tricks". (He also added the K for numerological reasons, with lots of predictably sexual symbolism: the letter can stand for ''kteis'' [''κτείς''], ancient Greek for, among [[http://greek_english.enacademic.com/26352/%CE%BA%CF%84%CE%B5%CE%AF%CF%82 many other things]], "public hair", "penis", ''or'' "vagina" [ancient Greek was a confusing language]. Considering that SexMagic was a significant part of his system of magick, the sexual symbolism is appropriate. Conveniently, it's also the eleventh letter of the alphabet and the number eleven is highly significant in his system of numerology.) He is in essence the originator of this trope, or at the very least, the popularizer of it.


* Creator/AleisterCrowley called his teachings "magick" in order to distinguish his "real" magic from "cheap parlor tricks". (He also added the K for numerological reasons, with lots of predictably sexual symbolism: the letter can stand for ''kteis'', ancient Greek for "vagina." Conveniently, it's also the eleventh letter of the alphabet and the number eleven is highly significant in his system of numerology.) He is in essence the originator of this trope, or at the very least, the popularizer of it.

to:

* Creator/AleisterCrowley called his teachings "magick" in order to distinguish his "real" magic from "cheap parlor tricks". (He also added the K for numerological reasons, with lots of predictably sexual symbolism: the letter can stand for ''kteis'', ''kteis'' [''κτείς''], ancient Greek for "vagina." for, among [[http://greek_english.enacademic.com/26352/%CE%BA%CF%84%CE%B5%CE%AF%CF%82 many other things]], "public hair", "penis", ''or'' "vagina" [ancient Greek was a confusing language]. Conveniently, it's also the eleventh letter of the alphabet and the number eleven is highly significant in his system of numerology.) He is in essence the originator of this trope, or at the very least, the popularizer of it.


* The death metal band Music/{{Nile}} have a song named "The Fiends Who Come To Steal The Magick Of The Deceased".

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* The death metal band Music/{{Nile}} have a song named "The Fiends Who Come To to Steal The the Magick Of The of the Deceased".



*** It's not spelled either way in Japanese as it uses a different script (actually three different scripts). Kunrei-shiki transliteration is more faithful to Japanese grammar than the more common Hepburn (which makes certain regular word endings irregular), but its transliterations do not match the actual sound of the letters in Western languages, making it useless for anyone who is not intimately familiar with Japanese.

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*** It's not spelled either way in Japanese as it uses a different script (actually three different scripts).scripts: hiragana, katakana, and kanji). Kunrei-shiki transliteration is more faithful to Japanese grammar than the more common Hepburn (which makes certain regular word endings irregular), but its transliterations do not match the actual sound of the letters in Western languages, making it useless for anyone who is not intimately familiar with Japanese.


In fiction however, Magick is used to differentiate it from other Fantasy genre magic. To simply put, while Fantasy magic has mana-fueled magic and wand waving, magick on the other hand is less flashy, spontaneous, and invisible. "Magic" is a word with a long history, and, like most older words, has been spelled all sorts of crazy ways at various times. That said, "magic" has been the official spelling ever since modern English was standardized. (Though that was [[NewerThanTheyThink more recent than you might expect]]: Creator/SamuelJohnson's publication of ''A Dictionary of the English Language'' in 1755 is co-TropeCodifier for modern English spelling alongside Noah Webster's ''A Dictionary of the English Language'', first edition 1828. Spelling in Early Modern English was... not actually standardised, really.)

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In fiction however, Magick is used to differentiate it from other Fantasy genre magic. To simply put, while Fantasy magic has mana-fueled magic and wand waving, magick on the other hand is less flashy, spontaneous, and invisible. "Magic" is a word with a long history, and, like most older words, has been spelled all sorts of crazy ways at various times. That said, "magic" has been the official spelling ever since modern English was standardized. (Though that was [[NewerThanTheyThink more recent than you might expect]]: Creator/SamuelJohnson's publication of ''A Dictionary of the English Language'' in 1755 is co-TropeCodifier for modern English spelling alongside Noah Webster's ''A ''American Dictionary of the English Language'', first edition 1828. Spelling in Early Modern English was... not actually standardised, really.)


In fiction however, Magick is used to differentiate it from other Fantasy genre magic. To simply put, while Fantasy magic has mana-fueled magic and wand waving, magick on the other hand is less flashy, spontaneous, and invisible. "Magic" is a word with a long history, and, like most older words, has been spelled all sorts of crazy ways at various times. That said, "magic" has been the official spelling ever since modern English was standardized.

to:

In fiction however, Magick is used to differentiate it from other Fantasy genre magic. To simply put, while Fantasy magic has mana-fueled magic and wand waving, magick on the other hand is less flashy, spontaneous, and invisible. "Magic" is a word with a long history, and, like most older words, has been spelled all sorts of crazy ways at various times. That said, "magic" has been the official spelling ever since modern English was standardized.
standardized. (Though that was [[NewerThanTheyThink more recent than you might expect]]: Creator/SamuelJohnson's publication of ''A Dictionary of the English Language'' in 1755 is co-TropeCodifier for modern English spelling alongside Noah Webster's ''A Dictionary of the English Language'', first edition 1828. Spelling in Early Modern English was... not actually standardised, really.)




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** Knowing the Web, it's more likely an equivalent of WritingAroundTrademarks: the most probable explanation is that the domain names for [=ImageMagic=] were already taken and would've cost considerable sums of money to purchase.


* The ''{{Heroclix}}'' figure of ''Comicbook/XMen'' character [[XtremeKoolLetterz Magik]] is misspelled 'MAGICK'.

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* The ''{{Heroclix}}'' ''TabletopGame/HeroClix'' figure of ''Comicbook/XMen'' character [[XtremeKoolLetterz Magik]] is misspelled 'MAGICK'.


Magick means, in fact, magic. "Magick" is an archaick spelling, dating back to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe Early Modern English]] where it appeared in the worcks of poets such as Edmund Spenser. Creator/AleisterCrowley revived this spelling to add an air of archaism, distinguishing "[[ThisIsReality actual]] [[WrongContextMagic magic]]" from [[StageMagician stage shows]]. {{Wicca}}ns and other Neo-Pagans, influenced by Crowley (to varying degrees), have picked up the Crowleyan spelling. Others use newer idiosyncratick spellings like "magique" and "majik." For whatever reason, this casual approach to spelling seems to have taken off in the mass media, especially things trying to be [[DarkerAndEdgier edgy]]. The constant misspelling of "magic" has been known to drive {{Grammar Nazi}}s up the wall, but it is reckommended you [[MST3KMantra don't worry about it too much]].

to:

Magick means, in fact, magic. "Magick" is an archaick spelling, dating back to [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe Early Modern English]] where it appeared in the worcks of poets such as Edmund Spenser. Creator/AleisterCrowley revived this spelling to add an air of archaism, distinguishing "[[ThisIsReality actual]] [[WrongContextMagic magic]]" from [[StageMagician stage shows]]. {{Wicca}}ns UsefulNotes/{{Wicca}}ns and other Neo-Pagans, influenced by Crowley (to varying degrees), have picked up the Crowleyan spelling. Others use newer idiosyncratick spellings like "magique" and "majik." For whatever reason, this casual approach to spelling seems to have taken off in the mass media, especially things trying to be [[DarkerAndEdgier edgy]]. The constant misspelling of "magic" has been known to drive {{Grammar Nazi}}s up the wall, but it is reckommended you [[MST3KMantra don't worry about it too much]].



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* The death metal band Music/{{Nile}} have a song named "The Fiends Who Come To Steal The Magick Of The Deceased".

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