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* In ''Manga/MonthlyGirlsNozakiKun'', Wakamatsu tries acting to become more confident. Kashima gives him an eyepatch to help him get into character as a villain and overcome his stage fright. He immediately becomes more confident, acting cool and aloof, and tries wearing the eyepatch around school. Of course, limited depth perception is a problem in basketball, causing him to trip.

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* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls'': Invoked, but subverted in one of the Choose Your Own Ending shorts. Should Rainbow Dash choose to accept Bulk Biceps' help, he gives her his lucky sock to help her win a soccer game. When she does win, Bulk explains that the sock was just an ordinary sock, and that Rainbow Dash didn't need luck to win the game. The subversion comes from the fact that [[ThePigPen Bulk hasn't washed his socks in years]], and the sock he gave to Rainbow Dash was smelly enough to knock out the opposing team.


*** The last game of the season against the White Sox which would decide the American League pennant because of a celestial rule -- only Roger and Knox know this, though. The Angels' starting pitcher Mel Clark has been pitching the whole game and, with the Angels up 3-2 but the White Sox having the bases loaded and their massive slugger at the plate with a full count, is clearly exhausted after throwing around 200 pitches[[note]]this is already an incredibly high pitch count by early-1990's standards; with the modern-day sabermetrics emphasis on not overworking pitchers' arms throughout his career a pitcher reaching even half of that in a game almost never happens now[[/note]]. Knox comes out to talk to Clark and has Roger give the arm-flapping gesture he used throughout the season to signal Knox of an angel's presence. Soon, his friend JP, the rest of the Angels' team, and the whole home crowd start doing the same, convincing Clark to give it one more go. [[spoiler:He does and gets the White Sox batter to line out to him on a diving catch for the final out, and the Angels win the pennant. It isn't until the team is in the middle of celebrating on the field that Knox tells Clark the truth -- there was no angel that time, Knox having told Roger before coming onto the field to [[MotivationalLie give a false "angel" signal]].]]

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*** The last game of the season against the White Sox which would decide the American League pennant because of a celestial rule -- only Roger and Knox know this, though. The Angels' starting pitcher Mel Clark has been pitching the whole game and, with the Angels up 3-2 but the White Sox having the bases loaded and their massive slugger at the plate with a full count, is clearly exhausted after throwing around 200 160 pitches[[note]]this is already an incredibly high pitch count by early-1990's standards; with the modern-day sabermetrics emphasis on not overworking pitchers' arms throughout his career a pitcher reaching even half of that in a game almost never happens now[[/note]]. Knox comes out to talk to Clark and has Roger give the arm-flapping gesture he used throughout the season to signal Knox of an angel's presence. Soon, his friend JP, the rest of the Angels' team, and the whole home crowd start doing the same, convincing Clark to give it one more go. [[spoiler:He does and gets the White Sox batter to line out to him on a diving catch for the final out, and the Angels win the pennant. It isn't until the team is in the middle of celebrating on the field that Knox tells Clark the truth -- there was no angel that time, Knox having told Roger before coming onto the field to [[MotivationalLie give a false "angel" signal]].]]


* ''ComicBook/TheFlash'':
** Flash once manages to nick Mr. Element's gun, only to find it useless. The bemused Element explains that the gun only focuses his powers -- it isn't the source of them.
** We've [[{{Retcon}} recently learned]] that the Weather Wizard's powers are also innate, a fact which he himself didn't know (he thought his Weather Wand had the power -- and so did the last five decades worth of writers, apparently). Though, in Weather Wizard's case, it is at least implied that his power wasn't ''originally'' innate. Rather, repeated use of his Weather Wand caused him to internalize its power years ago. He never realized this because he actually ''did'' need the thing originally and therefore never tried to use the powers without it until more or less forced to.
* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'':
** The first Morlun story has Ezekiel, another man with spider-based powers, explain to Spidey that he didn't get his powers due to the fact that the spider that bit him was radioactive, but that the spider gave Peter superpowers magically and was nearly killed by the radiation in the process. This retcon has since been re-retconned away again.
** New ''Spider-Man'' villain The Extremist was originally thought by our web-headed hero to get his powers from his fancy gun, but it's soon revealed that the power is innately in him and he just uses the gun to help him focus it.
** Similarly, loony supervillain Madcap uses a bubble gun that makes people lose all inhibitions... except the power is actually tied to his gaze, and he just uses the bubble gun as a distraction to get people to look at him.

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* ''ComicBook/TheFlash'':
** Flash once manages to nick Mr. Element's gun, only to find it useless. The bemused Element explains that the gun only focuses his powers -- it isn't the source of them.
**
We've [[{{Retcon}} recently learned]] in ''ComicBook/TheFlash'' that the Weather Wizard's powers are also innate, a fact which he himself didn't know (he thought his Weather Wand had the power -- and so did the last five decades worth of writers, apparently). Though, in Weather Wizard's case, it is at least implied that his power wasn't ''originally'' innate. Rather, repeated use of his Weather Wand caused him to internalize its power years ago. He never realized this because he actually ''did'' need the thing originally and therefore never tried to use the powers without it until more or less forced to.
* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'':
** The first Morlun story has Ezekiel, another man with spider-based powers, explain to Spidey that he didn't get his powers due to the fact that the spider that bit him was radioactive, but that the spider gave Peter superpowers magically and was nearly killed by the radiation in the process. This retcon has since been re-retconned away again.
** New ''Spider-Man'' villain The Extremist was originally thought by our web-headed hero to get his powers from his fancy gun, but it's soon revealed that the power is innately in him and he just uses the gun to help him focus it.
** Similarly, loony supervillain Madcap uses a bubble gun that makes people lose all inhibitions... except the power is actually tied to his gaze, and he just uses the bubble gun as a distraction to get people to look at him.
to.



* ''ComicBook/{{Sleepwalker}}'''s FriendlyEnemy Spectra's rainbow-like energy powers were originally assumed to come from the synthetic diamond she wielded. She later reveals that her body has actually ''absorbed'' the powers of the diamond, and she only uses the crystal to help her focus her powers.



* [[DependingOnTheWriter Some writers]] have stated that ComicBook/{{Zatanna}}'s speaking spells backwards routine is just a focusing technique and that she can cast spells without using it (she uses this justification when she takes down the supervillain Magenta while gagged in an issue of ''Franchise/WonderWoman'', for instance). However, current canon says the backwards words ''are'' necessary, but they need not be spoken (writing them will work, for instance).


* ''ComicBook/TheTransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'': After joining the Lost Light, Megatron is put on fool's energon, energon tainted with substances to weaken Megatron, in order to keep him in line. Eventually however, Megatron grows to appreciate the stuff, having come to the conclusion that he's a better bot under its influence (given that he outright renounces violence after a few months on it, he's certainly justified in thinking that). Then in a pivotal moment in issue 55, [[spoiler: Ratchet reveals that fool's energon is nothing more than unfiltered, garden variety energon; Megatron's internals were such a disaster after what Shockwave did to him, Ratchet and Optimus couldn't give him anything else, so they came up with fool's energon as a sort of SecrerTestOfCharacter. The revelation that everything he did up to that point was of his own volition as opposed to any sort of brainwashing, compounded with the sight of Tarn [[HalfTheManHeUsedToBe tearing Ravage in half]] is enough to convince Megatron to take up his fusion cannon one last time.]]

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* ''ComicBook/TheTransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'': After joining the Lost Light, Megatron is put on fool's energon, energon tainted with substances to weaken Megatron, in order to keep him in line. Eventually however, Megatron grows to appreciate the stuff, having come to the conclusion that he's a better bot under its influence (given that he outright renounces violence after a few months on it, he's certainly justified in thinking that). Then in a pivotal moment in issue 55, 54, [[spoiler: Ratchet reveals that fool's energon is nothing more than unfiltered, garden variety energon; Megatron's internals were such a disaster after what Shockwave did to him, Ratchet and Optimus couldn't give him anything else, so they came up with fool's energon as a sort of SecrerTestOfCharacter.SecretTestOfCharacter. The revelation that everything he did up to that point was of his own volition as opposed to any sort of brainwashing, compounded with the sight of Tarn [[HalfTheManHeUsedToBe tearing Ravage in half]] is enough to convince Megatron to take up his fusion cannon one last time.]]


*
''ComicBook/TheTransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'': After joining the Lost Light, Megatron is put on fool's energon, energon tainted with substances to weaken Megatron, in order to keep him in line. Eventually however, Megatron grows to appreciate the stuff, having come to the conclusion that he's a better bot under its influence (given that he outright renounces violence after a few months on it, he's certainly justified in thinking that). Then in a pivotal moment in issue 55, [[spoiler: Ratchet reveals that fool's energon is nothing more than unfiltered, garden variety energon; Megatron's internals were such a disaster after what Shockwave did to him, Ratchet and Optimus couldn't give him anything else, so they came up with fool's energon as a sort of SecrerTestOfCharacter. The revelation that everything he did up to that point was of his own volition as opposed to any sort of brainwashing, compounded with the sight of Tarn [[HalfTheManHeUsedToBe tearing Ravage in half]] is enough to convince Megatron to take up his fusion cannon one last time.]]

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*
* ''ComicBook/TheTransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'': After joining the Lost Light, Megatron is put on fool's energon, energon tainted with substances to weaken Megatron, in order to keep him in line. Eventually however, Megatron grows to appreciate the stuff, having come to the conclusion that he's a better bot under its influence (given that he outright renounces violence after a few months on it, he's certainly justified in thinking that). Then in a pivotal moment in issue 55, [[spoiler: Ratchet reveals that fool's energon is nothing more than unfiltered, garden variety energon; Megatron's internals were such a disaster after what Shockwave did to him, Ratchet and Optimus couldn't give him anything else, so they came up with fool's energon as a sort of SecrerTestOfCharacter. The revelation that everything he did up to that point was of his own volition as opposed to any sort of brainwashing, compounded with the sight of Tarn [[HalfTheManHeUsedToBe tearing Ravage in half]] is enough to convince Megatron to take up his fusion cannon one last time.]]

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*
''ComicBook/TheTransformersMoreThanMeetsTheEye'': After joining the Lost Light, Megatron is put on fool's energon, energon tainted with substances to weaken Megatron, in order to keep him in line. Eventually however, Megatron grows to appreciate the stuff, having come to the conclusion that he's a better bot under its influence (given that he outright renounces violence after a few months on it, he's certainly justified in thinking that). Then in a pivotal moment in issue 55, [[spoiler: Ratchet reveals that fool's energon is nothing more than unfiltered, garden variety energon; Megatron's internals were such a disaster after what Shockwave did to him, Ratchet and Optimus couldn't give him anything else, so they came up with fool's energon as a sort of SecrerTestOfCharacter. The revelation that everything he did up to that point was of his own volition as opposed to any sort of brainwashing, compounded with the sight of Tarn [[HalfTheManHeUsedToBe tearing Ravage in half]] is enough to convince Megatron to take up his fusion cannon one last time.]]


-->'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\

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-->'''Mr.->'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\



'''Mr. Ping:''' Don't have to. To make something special you just have to believe it's special.

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'''Mr. Ping:''' Don't have to. To make something special special, you just have to believe it's special.


>'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\

to:

>'''Mr.-->'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\


%%>'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\

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%%>'''Mr.>'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\


%%
->'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\

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%%
->'''Mr.
%%>'''Mr. Ping:''' The secret ingredient is... nothing! You heard me. Nothing! There is no secret ingredient.\\



* In ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants and the Wrath of the Wicked Wedgie Woman'', even though Captain Underpants' powers came from [[SuperSerum alien super power juice]] (ItMakesSenseInContext), he's convinced they come from cottony soft underpants. When Captain Underpants is depowered by spray-on starch, the boys have to come up with a magical feather, so they {{Retcon}} a powerful crystal he swallowed as a child on his home planet (even though Captain Underpants is actually the boys' principal).

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* In ''Literature/CaptainUnderpants and the Wrath of the Wicked Wedgie Woman'', even though Captain Underpants' powers came from [[SuperSerum alien super power juice]] (ItMakesSenseInContext), he's convinced they come from cottony soft underpants. When Captain Underpants is depowered by spray-on starch, the boys have to come up with a magical feather, so they {{Retcon}} a powerful crystal he swallowed as a child on his home planet (even though Captain Underpants is actually the boys' principal).principal, while Captain Underpants he believes he has the fictional character's backstory).



** In ''Literature/OnAPaleHorse'', while fighting {{Satan}}, [[TheGrimReaper Death]] realizes that he doesn't actually need his scythe and cloak to use his powers, reasoning that if that had been true, Satan would have attacked him earlier while he was off duty.

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** In ''Literature/OnAPaleHorse'', while fighting {{Satan}}, [[TheGrimReaper Death]] realizes that he doesn't actually need his scythe and cloak to use his powers, reasoning that if that had been true, Satan would have attacked him earlier while he was off duty. (The course of the series suggests his reasoning was actually wrong about that but his intuition was correct - while the scythe and cloak are in fact highly enchanted objects that would permit almost anyone to carry out the minimum of job performance as Death, it's the actual officeholder's adjustment to the office and intent to fill it which really matters.)



* Played with in ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'' when Uncle Arthur helps Darrin stand up to Endora - he teaches Darrin an incantation to defeat her and gives him a talisman that is simply a lamp finial. It turns out the incantation is useless gibberish - Arthur is just messing with Darrin for laughs.

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* Played with in ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'' when Uncle Arthur helps Darrin stand up to Endora - he teaches Darrin an incantation to defeat her and gives him a talisman that is simply a lamp finial. It turns out the incantation is useless gibberish - Arthur is just messing with Darrin for laughs. (However, it works both in the sense that Darrin does successfully banish Endora with the ritual - and because working to counter-prank Arthur gets Darrin a tiny bit closer to the acceptance from Endora he actually needs.)


* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', the Sacred Water in Karin's Tower that Goku wants to drink supposedly gives one super strength, but when Taopaipai goes for it, Karin reveals that it's just regular tap water, and it was just Goku's exertion in climbing the tower and fighting Karin for the jug that made him stronger. He purposefully gives Tao the jug without any hassle ''and'' gives him a dark Nimbus for the trip down so that he doesn't become any stronger.
** [[spoiler: Later on, he reveals that there really ''is'' a magic water. However, since it kills anyone who isn't a Determinator (and in the anime most people die before they even get that far), Karin doesn't keep it on display.]]

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* In ''Manga/DragonBall'', the Sacred Water in gives you super strength according to legend, but first Goku must climb the StarScraper that is Karin's Tower Tower, which takes several days, and then he spends three more days snatching the jug from the very agile Karin. Upon drinking it however, Goku finds that Goku wants to drink supposedly gives one super strength, but when Taopaipai goes for it, he doesn't feel any different: Karin reveals that it's just regular tap water, and it was just Goku's exertion in exertions climbing the tower and fighting getting it from him were all that was needed[[note]]hinted at when Karin for tossed Goku's Four-Star Ball off the jug tower: it took Goku only a few hours to climb down and then back up, compared to several days just getting up the first time[[/note]]. Crosses over with SecretTestOfCharacter when Tao Pai-Pai visits: Karin can tell immediately that made him stronger. He purposefully he's not a good person and just gives Tao him the jug tap water without any hassle ''and'' fuss, and even gives him a dark Nimbus cloud for the trip down down, so that he doesn't become any stronger.
** [[spoiler: Later on, he Karin reveals that [[spoiler: there really ''is'' a magic water. water, the Ultra Divine Water, that can increase one's strength, which is possibly the source of the original Sacred Water legend. However, it isn't actually this trope since it kills legitimately ''does'' give the drinker a power boost; it's just killed anyone who isn't a Determinator drank it (and in the anime most people die before they even get that far), Karin doesn't keep it on display.far).]]

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* The Danny Ketch version of ComicBook/GhostRider initially believed he transformed into the titular character by touching his [[CoolBike mystical motorcycle]]. In ''Hearts of Darkness'' (a {{Crossover}} featauring Ghost Rider, Comicbook/{{Punisher}} and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}), the villain Blackheart stole Danny's bike. Believing himself unable to transform, he decided to steal an ordinary bike to reach the villain's location, only to discover that he could transform on his own, also changing the ordinary bike into a mystical one.


* Inverted in ''WesternAnimation/{{Frozen}}'', where Elsa is given a pair of gloves to help her control her ice powers. It's made clear that the gloves don't do anything, they provide a placebo effect and help her calm down. She's shown producing ice from her feet, changing her outfit with magic and she breaks an enormous pair of shackles.

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* Inverted in ''WesternAnimation/{{Frozen}}'', ''WesternAnimation/Frozen2013'', where Elsa is given a pair of gloves to help her control her ice powers. It's made clear that the gloves don't do anything, they provide a placebo effect and help her calm down. She's shown producing ice from her feet, changing her outfit with magic and she breaks an enormous pair of shackles.

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