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* In the second Literature/CircleOfMagic book, Niko doesn't have time to teach Tris how to see magic, so he puts a spell on her glasses to help her see it. When she asks how long it will last, he says "As long as you have those lenses." Two books later, he casually reveals that wasn't true: the spell only lasted a week. Ever since, she's been seeing magic on her own.


* In ''Film/TheLuckOfTheIrish'', the protagonist's grandfather ([[spoiler:a leprechaun]]) is watching the protagonist and his BlackBestFriend play basketball against an evil leprechaun. A large part of the plot involves the protagonist losing his lucky coin (stolen by the BigBad), with his family suffering bad luck since then. At the game, the grandfather sees that their team is losing and throws his grandson's friend a coin, claiming it's lucky. The guy's game immediately improves. The protagonist confronts his grandfather, as he knows the coin is fake. The grandfather invokes this trope, causing the protagonist to realize that he can make his own luck without relying on some coin. Subverted in that the stolen coin is really magical (part of its powers include maintaining TheMasquerade), as, before, Ryan's life was a chain of good luck, and he never had to work for anything (e.g. his basketball plays are full of Hail Marys, and his good grades are a result of him guessing on tests).

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* In ''Film/TheLuckOfTheIrish'', the protagonist's grandfather ([[spoiler:a leprechaun]]) is watching the protagonist and his BlackBestFriend TokenBlackFriend play basketball against an evil leprechaun. A large part of the plot involves the protagonist losing his lucky coin (stolen by the BigBad), with his family suffering bad luck since then. At the game, the grandfather sees that their team is losing and throws his grandson's friend a coin, claiming it's lucky. The guy's game immediately improves. The protagonist confronts his grandfather, as he knows the coin is fake. The grandfather invokes this trope, causing the protagonist to realize that he can make his own luck without relying on some coin. Subverted in that the stolen coin is really magical (part of its powers include maintaining TheMasquerade), as, before, Ryan's life was a chain of good luck, and he never had to work for anything (e.g. his basketball plays are full of Hail Marys, and his good grades are a result of him guessing on tests).


* ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'':
** The remake has this too, with the whole crowd at an Angels baseball game making wing-flapping gestures to help their pitcher make a strikeout, without the divine intervention they've been relying on these past few months. This is a variation, as it turns out that even though they had the ability to win the whole time, they actually had been receiving help.
** Even in the original film, when the angels have to quit because Duffy's angry outburst violates the terms of the agreement, they reveal that they had gradually been helping less as the team's morale improved, so they should be okay on their own in the playoffs.

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* ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'':
** The remake has this too, with
''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'': Both versions of the whole crowd at an Angels baseball game making wing-flapping gestures to help film have a Downplayed version of the trope as for most of their pitcher make a strikeout, without the stories there really ''was'' divine intervention they've been relying on these past few months. This is a variation, as it turns out that even though they had the ability to win the whole time, they actually had been receiving help.
** Even
earlier in the season -- it just wasn't there in the final games of the season.
** The
original film, when film had the angels have to who were providing supernatural help in baseball games throughout the season quit because Duffy's angry outburst violates the terms of the agreement, they agreement. They reveal that they had gradually been helping less as the team's morale improved, so they should be okay on their own in the playoffs. playoffs.
** The 1994 remake has a couple of instances of the angels (the heavenly beings) not helping the Angels (the professional baseball team):
*** During the quick-cut montage of games showcasing the Angels' miraculous comeback from last place in the league all the way up to the top of the standings after the All-Star break, there is one instance of a game against the Yankees where George Knox (the Angels' bench manager), after seeing another outstanding defensive play, excitedly waves his arms to indicate the "angels are here" sign, only to turn and see Roger (the only one who can actually see said angels) just shake his head to say "no, there weren't angels there". Knox gives an understandably shocked, "No?!" of disbelief.
*** The last game of the season against the White Sox which would decide the American League pennant because of a celestial rule -- only Roger and Knox know this, though. The Angels' starting pitcher Mel Clark has been pitching the whole game and, with the Angels up 3-2 but the White Sox having the bases loaded and their massive slugger at the plate with a full count, is clearly exhausted after throwing around 200 pitches[[note]]this is already an incredibly high pitch count by early-1990's standards; with the modern-day sabermetrics emphasis on not overworking pitchers' arms throughout his career a pitcher reaching even half of that in a game almost never happens now[[/note]]. Knox comes out to talk to Clark and has Roger give the arm-flapping gesture he used throughout the season to signal Knox of an angel's presence. Soon, his friend JP, the rest of the Angels' team, and the whole home crowd start doing the same, convincing Clark to give it one more go. [[spoiler:He does and gets the White Sox batter to line out to him on a diving catch for the final out, and the Angels win the pennant. It isn't until the team is in the middle of celebrating on the field that Knox tells Clark the truth -- there was no angel that time, Knox having told Roger before coming onto the field to [[MotivationalLie give a false "angel" signal]].]]


* Used in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats1985'', when the mind-controlling villain Alluro acquires an amulet in a box that is supposed to ramp up powers. He then proceeds to easily mesmerize all the heroes except for Snarf, who manages to get the box away from him, and then defeat him, even using the powers of the [[EmpathicWeapon Sword of Omens]], which had previously only activated for its proper wielder. At the end, naturally, Snarf realizes he never bothered to open the box to see what the amulet looked like, and when he does ''does'' open it, it's revealed that the amulet inside has been broken for some time. Probably a good thing nobody told the bad guy.

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* Used in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/ThunderCats1985'', when the mind-controlling villain Alluro acquires an amulet in a box that is supposed to ramp up powers. He then proceeds to easily mesmerize all the heroes except for Snarf, who manages to get the box away from him, and then defeat him, even using the powers of the [[EmpathicWeapon Sword of Omens]], which had previously only activated for its proper wielder. At the end, naturally, Snarf realizes he never bothered to open the box to see what the amulet looked like, and when he does ''does'' open it, it's revealed that the amulet inside has been broken for some time. Probably a good thing nobody told the bad guy.


* A ''ComicBook/{{MickeyMouse}}'' story called "Topolino e la spada invincibile" ("Mickey and the Invincible Sword") stars Mickey as the son of a famous swordsmith, who is tasked with forging the perfect sword for the king's nephew, Prince Pete. Pete imprisons the swordsmith in a tower in his castle, but unknownst to him Mickey has smuggled himself into the tower. Once the sword is finished, Pete reveals that he never intended to release the swordsmith, and Mickey, furious, swears to defeat Pete and rescue his father. His father claims that this would require an even more formidable sword, which would take at least two years to create and must then be dipped in a magic spring. Mickey spends two years practicing his skills, then escapes the tower with the newly forged sword. Taking up apprenticeship with the aging swordsman [[TricksterMentor Ben Longo]] (Goofy), he passes several difficult tests and finally finds the magic spring. Returning to the city, he easily defeats Pete and is knighted. Upon protesting that it was all thanks to the invincible sword, his father and Ben reveal that the sword and spring are wholly mundane - Mickey just needed the time to grow, both physically and mentally.

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* A ''ComicBook/{{MickeyMouse}}'' ''ComicBook/MickeyMouseComicUniverse'' story called "Topolino e la spada invincibile" ("Mickey and the Invincible Sword") stars Mickey WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse as the son of a famous swordsmith, who is tasked with forging the perfect sword for the king's nephew, Prince Pete. Pete imprisons the swordsmith in a tower in his castle, but unknownst to him Mickey has smuggled himself into the tower. Once the sword is finished, Pete reveals that he never intended to release the swordsmith, and Mickey, furious, swears to defeat Pete and rescue his father. His father claims that this would require an even more formidable sword, which would take at least two years to create and must then be dipped in a magic spring. Mickey spends two years practicing his skills, then escapes the tower with the newly forged sword. Taking up apprenticeship with the aging swordsman [[TricksterMentor Ben Longo]] (Goofy), he passes several difficult tests and finally finds the magic spring. Returning to the city, he easily defeats Pete and is knighted. Upon protesting that it was all thanks to the invincible sword, his father and Ben reveal that the sword and spring are wholly mundane - Mickey just needed the time to grow, both physically and mentally.


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* In ''Fanfic/TheSecondTry'' sequel ''Webcomic/AkiChansLife'', it's the titular character's first day of kindergarten, and she's upset about being forced to wear an uniform. So Touji gives Aki his old school hat, which's "empowered by the spirit of freedom", and whose "magic" will make her feel comfortable no matter what. It helps Aki get through her first day until she realizes she doesn't really need it.


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* In ''Literature/WizardOfThePigeons'', all wizards have to follow certain rules to [[ConditionalPowers keep their magic working]]. The titular [[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep Wizard]] must care for pigeons, answer questions for those who ask him, never abuse his strength on others, never have more than a dollar on his person, remain celibate, and help those who come to him for help. However, late in the story it's revealed that [[spoiler: half the rules are ones he had made up himself and forgotten, and have no real impact on his magic except that he [[PlaceboEffect thought they did]]]].

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* ''Literature/TheBelgariad'': In her prequel novel, Polgara the Sorceress teaches her seneschal {{Telepathy}} by telling him that she enchanted a particular closet to transmit his thoughts to her when he stands in it. Once he gets used to the ability, she reveals that it was his own [[AchievementsInIgnorance Achievement in Ignorance]].


Alice is given a supposed magic item that will give her special/exceptional abilities. She does amazingly well, but then she loses the item. She goes back to her {{mentors}}, only to learn that it was just a useless placebo, and "[[ItWasWithYouAllAlong the magic was inside you all along!]]" Sometimes the audience knows, or at least suspects, that Alice's abilities were her own, but othfer times TheReveal is just as much a surprise to them as to her.

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Alice is given a supposed magic item that will give her special/exceptional abilities. She does amazingly well, but then she loses the item. She goes back to her {{mentors}}, only to learn that it was just a useless placebo, and "[[ItWasWithYouAllAlong the magic was inside you all along!]]" Sometimes the audience knows, or at least suspects, that Alice's abilities were her own, but othfer other times TheReveal is just as much a surprise to them as to her.

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** Parodied: [[https://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/all-along Why sociologists shouldn't be allowed to make movies:]] "It wasn't that ring that made you successful! It was the confidence it gave you -- in addition to being an able-bodied young person in history's richest country -- all along!"


Alice is given a supposed magic item that will give her special/exceptional abilities. She does amazingly well, but then she loses the item. She goes back to her {{mentors}}, only to learn that it was just a useless placebo, and "[[ItWasWithYouAllAlong the magic was inside you all along!]]" Sometimes the audience knows, or at least suspects, that Alice's abilities were her own, but other times TheReveal is just as much a surprise to them as to her.

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Alice is given a supposed magic item that will give her special/exceptional abilities. She does amazingly well, but then she loses the item. She goes back to her {{mentors}}, only to learn that it was just a useless placebo, and "[[ItWasWithYouAllAlong the magic was inside you all along!]]" Sometimes the audience knows, or at least suspects, that Alice's abilities were her own, but other othfer times TheReveal is just as much a surprise to them as to her.



* ''Webcomic/CheshireCrossing'' plays this straight with Dorothy's ruby slippers; however, the slippers do possess some intrinsic power, since other characters can use them normally. And this intrinsic power is actually the power to mimic the abilities of the last person to wear them.

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* ''Webcomic/CheshireCrossing'' plays this straight with Dorothy's ruby slippers; however, slippers: The teleportation power was all hers. However, the slippers do possess some intrinsic power, since other characters can use them normally. And this intrinsic power is actually power: the power to mimic the abilities of the last person to wear them.


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* ''Webcomic/ElGoonishShive'': Tedd created a glove that lets him enchant watches so they can cast spells. Pandora [[http://egscomics.com/comic/2017-07-03 reveals to him]] he's doing it under his own power.
-->'''Tedd:''' So this doesn't actually work. I put weeks into planning this thing. I was really proud of myself. I should have known something was wrong when it worked on the first try.


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* ''Series/RaisingDion'': In episode 3, Dion is already aware that he has superpowers, but has trouble controling them leading to several cases of PowerIncontinence. At the suggestion of Pat (who even mentions the trope by name here), Dion's mom Nicole gives Dion his late father's watch and convinces him it helps the wearer stay focussed. It works, and Dion gains much more control over his powers.


** The concept is revisited in Season 23's "Crowning Around", where Rajiv loses his crown when it gets knocked off his funnel by a crane and taken by the monkeys. He believes that he can't be useful without it, and Shankar has to do his work for him. Near the end of the episode, when Noor Jehan can't stop due to her brakes being jammed and is heading towards Shankar, Rajiv pushes Shankar out of the way just in time, which gets him to realize that he can still be useful without his crown.

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** The concept is revisited in Season 23's "Crowning Around", "[[Recap/ThomasTheTankEngineS23E2CrowningAround Crowning Around]]", where Rajiv loses his crown when it gets knocked off his funnel by a crane and taken by the monkeys. He believes that he can't be useful without it, and Shankar has to do his work for him. Near the end of the episode, when Noor Jehan can't stop due to her brakes being jammed and is heading towards Shankar, Rajiv pushes Shankar out of the way just in time, which gets him to realize that he can still be useful without his crown.


'''Homer:''' Oh - OH! Well, now that I look even CLOSER-

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'''Homer:''' Oh - OH! [[VerbalBackspace Well, now that I look even CLOSER-CLOSER-]]

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