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** It's been mentioned more than once (dating back to her original manual synopsis) that Birdo prefers going by "Birdetta", yet the game's continuously call her "Birdo". This comes back to this: in Japan, it's stated that she's named "Catherine" but prefers being called "Cathy". It's just about nicknames, not preferred names. As a result, Nintendo usually ignores the old [[TheArtifact artifact]] of Birdo preferring being called "Birdetta".

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** It's been mentioned more than once (dating back to her original manual synopsis) that Birdo prefers going by "Birdetta", yet the game's continuously call her "Birdo". This comes back to this: this trope: in Japan, it's stated that she's named "Catherine" but prefers being called "Cathy". It's just about nicknames, not preferred names. As a result, Nintendo usually ignores the old [[TheArtifact artifact]] of Birdo preferring being called "Birdetta".



* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'': In ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon1'' Nina has a [[YouNoTakeCandle really odd way of speaking]] and speaks as a ThirdPersonPerson. This is because the translators had difficulty translating her cutesy Japanese dialogue into English. When she was reintroduced in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonMagicalMelody'', her dialogue was smoothed out by the new translators.

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* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'': ''VideoGame/StoryOfSeasons'': In ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon1'' Nina has a [[YouNoTakeCandle really odd way of speaking]] and speaks as a ThirdPersonPerson. This is because the translators had difficulty translating her cutesy Japanese dialogue into English. When she was reintroduced in ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonMagicalMelody'', her dialogue was smoothed out by the new translators.


** The antagonist is a pretentious rich girl that speaks french and brags about her collection of french things. The french localization didn't change any dialog or edit any imagery, resulting in something that made no sense for the french audience.

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** The antagonist is a pretentious rich girl that speaks french French and brags about her collection of french French things. The french French localization didn't change any dialog or edit any imagery, resulting in something that made no sense for the french French audience.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheMrMenShow'' episode "Cooking" has Mr. Persnickety teaching a French cooking class. Unfortunately, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r209b84uxtM&feature=youtu.be&t=6m57s this show has actually been dubbed into French]], so the joke about not understanding the language is lost. They just replaced it with (insert something here).
** The fact that Miss Chatterbox giggles at one point makes it even worse.



* Emoji:

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* Emoji:[[UsefulNotes/{{Emojis}} Emoji]]:

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* ''Manga/NewGame''
** Hajime once suggests that if she becomes Ko's boss, she'll stop using "[[UsefulNotes/JapaneseHonorifics -san]]" on her, [[LastNameBasis calling her "Yagami" instead of "Yagami-san."]] In the dub, which doesn't include the honorifics (or even use the rough equivalent "Ms. Yagami") Hajime's ImagineSpot merely has her speaking to Ko in a more bossy and demanding voice.
** When Umiko's discusses her new hires with Kou, she says that Naru was putting on "a cat act," (a reference to Naru's [[BitchInSheepsClothing acting polite while Umiko's around but being hostile to Nene]]), while Nene was like an excitable puppy, prompting Kou to muse about Umiko comparing Naru and Nene to pets. The localizations retain the cat reference, but not the idiom.

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* The infamous HehHehYouSaidX chapter/episode of ''Manga/KaguyaSamaLoveIsWar'' focuses on the word "chinchin", which is a slang term for "penis" but is also the Japanese term for "beg" (as in, the dog-training trick). The official translation goes with "weiner", which loses the latter connotation entirely and makes it sound like Fujiwara really is talking about her dog's penis apropos of nothing.


** In the original Funimation dub, Freeza was portrayed as a short tempered SmugSuper who had HoYay undertones, a brutish way of speaking and a feminine voice. In the original Japanese version, however, Frieza was portrayed as a sophisticated well-mannered, but FauxAffablyEvil tyrant, who only showed anger when stopped going his way. It was not until ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' that American fans were introduced to the sophiscated, well-mannered tyrant he was originally intended to be.

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** In the original Funimation dub, Freeza Frieza was portrayed as a short tempered SmugSuper who had HoYay undertones, a brutish way of speaking and a feminine voice. In the original Japanese version, however, Frieza was portrayed as a sophisticated well-mannered, but FauxAffablyEvil tyrant, who only showed anger when stopped going his way. It was not until ''Anime/DragonBallKai'' that American fans were introduced to the sophiscated, well-mannered tyrant he was originally intended to be.


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** The way Bulma addresses Goku in Japanese. She mostly calls him ''Son'' (Son-kun), although that's his family name, she calls him that way to show how close and familiar she is with him while the rest of the cast appropriately calls him Goku. Bulma referring to Goku as Son in English would make many children scratch their heads in confusion, so it was completely dropped in the English localization, and curiously in some other countries as well. The English manga did keep this in some instances, though.


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* Whoever wrote the Russian dub of ''Film/DeathBecomesHer'' misheard Lisle's impression of Creator/GretaGarbo's famous "I want to be alone-ya" quote as "I want to be ''a lawyer''."

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* Whoever wrote the Russian dub of ''Film/DeathBecomesHer'' misheard Lisle's impression of Creator/GretaGarbo's famous quote "I want vont to be alone-ya" quote as "I want vont to be ''a lawyer''."

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* Whoever wrote the Russian dub of ''Film/DeathBecomesHer'' misheard Lisle's impression of Creator/GretaGarbo's famous "I want to be alone-ya" quote as "I want to be ''a lawyer''."

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* ''Manga/RoujotekiShoujoHinataChan'': Hinata is a six year-old with the personality and mannerisms of an 88 year-old woman as a result of retaining memories of her past life. Some of Hinata's less obvious mannerisms, specifically her speech patterns, don't carry over well to English. The first chapter features her being corrected about using "ore" instead of "watashi" by her mother, a habit Hinata had developed in her previous life. She also has a VerbalTic of ending sentences with "dappe", something that can't be easily translated since English doesn't have that kind of convention.




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** It's been mentioned more than once (dating back to her original manual synopsis) that Birdo prefers going by "Birdetta", yet the game's continuously call her "Birdo". This comes back to this: in Japan, it's stated that she's named "Catherine" but prefers being called "Cathy". It's just about nicknames, not preferred names. As a result, Nintendo usually ignores the old [[TheArtifact artifact]] of Birdo preferring being called "Birdetta".


** The word ''bully'' doesn't have a very good translation in that language. Many translators leave the word untranslated or it's sometimes translated as ''Acosador'' but that word is normally translated as "stalker", and it's not a good equivalent. Some online translators like Google Translate translate the word as ''Matón'', but that word is normally translated as "hitman" in Spanish. There's ''lots'' of heated discussions about how to properly translate "bully" in Spanish, to the point the topic could became into a FlameWar.

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** In a similar way, turtles and tortoises are named as ''tortugas'' in Spanish, but not viceversa, since they're related. In scientific terms, however, tortoises are named "tortugas gigantes" (Giant turtles), compared with their smaller cousins.
** A subversion of this happens in Japanese: While turtles and tortoises are commonly named as "kame" (亀), their giant cousins are named as "rikugame" (陸亀) instead in scientific backgrounds.
** The word ''bully'' doesn't have a very good translation in that language. Many translators leave the word untranslated or it's sometimes translated as ''Acosador'' but that word is normally translated as "stalker", and it's not a good equivalent. Some online translators like Google Translate Translate, translate the word as ''Matón'', but that word is normally translated as "hitman" in Spanish. There's ''lots'' of heated discussions about how to properly translate "bully" in Spanish, to the point the topic could became into a FlameWar.

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* ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' has a recurring problem with English translations in that they tend to drop the [[ReferenceOverdosed prevalent references to Western music]] throughout the series.
** [[Manga/SteelBallRun The seventh part of the series]] has the occasional scene of Gyro telling Johnny a joke that he thought up. Thing is, some of these jokes are heavily reliant on Japanese culture or puns, so they're really difficult to translate into English.


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** [[VideoGame/MegaManX Vile]] is named "Vava" in the original Japanese version. Come ''VideoGame/MegaManZero'''s third installment, which introduces the character Dr. Vile, named Dr. Weil overseas to prevent confusion. As a result, the [[VideoGame/MegaManZXAdvent name of the Biometal that takes after him]] is also changed to a rather un-frightening "Model Double-U" instead of the original "Model V".


** One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon!" but in PAL it is translated as "To Me!" The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me". ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon 2}}'' fixes this by changing the translation to "This Way!"

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** One of the two signals is this. In North American English it is translated as "C'mon!" but in PAL British English, it is translated as "To Me!" The signal is meant to be used when you want other teammates to come to the same spot as you. "C'mon" is a direct translation of the Japanese version however Americans don't usually use "C'mon" to signal someone near them ("Come Here" would be more appropriate). Thus many American players spam "C'mon" when angry, which doesn't make sense to European gamers who see it as spamming "To Me". ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon 2}}'' fixes this by changing the translation wording to "This Way!"


* The English home page of Wiki/TVTropes describes itself as being "a ''buttload'' more informal" than Wikipedia, a turn of phrase which is nearly impossible to translate into other languages (and indeed seems not to have been) because of all the implications about the speaker and slight differences between different words used in English for bottom.


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* The English home page of Wiki/TVTropes describes itself as being "a ''buttload'' more informal" than Wikipedia, a turn of phrase which is nearly impossible to translate into other languages (and indeed seems not to have been) because of all the implications about the speaker and slight differences between different words used in English for bottom.


** The English dub translated Naruto's AffectionateNickname for Tsunade, "Tsunade-baachan", literally by using "Grandma Tsunade". Though this is accurate, it comes off rude. "Auntie/Aunt Tsunade" would have kept the tone of the Japanese term, even if it's not as accurate.

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** The English dub translated Naruto's AffectionateNickname for Tsunade, "Tsunade-baachan", literally by using "Grandma Tsunade". Though this is accurate, it comes off rude.as rude- granted, in the original Japanese, Naruto's remarkably casual toward Tsunade as a Sannin (and later Hokage), since almost everyone else in the village calls her "Tsunade-sama" ("Lady Tsunade"). "Auntie/Aunt Tsunade" would have kept the tone of the Japanese term, even if it's not as accurate.



** When [[FanNickname Facepalm-kun]] and Black Mist refer to the mysterious voice on the computer as "Sensei"; almost everyone assumed that this was meant as "Teacher" or "Master", a.k.a. towards their boss and the ManBehindTheMan. Later, it's established that it was actually "Sensei", as in "Doctor".

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** When [[FanNickname Facepalm-kun]] Tomura "[[FanNickname Facepalm-kun]]" Shigaraki and Black Mist Kurogiri refer to the mysterious voice on the computer as "Sensei"; almost everyone assumed that this was meant as "Teacher" or "Master", a.k.a. towards their boss and the ManBehindTheMan.ManBehindTheMan, All For One. Later, it's established that it was actually "Sensei", as in "Doctor".



*** The Personas used to fuse [[spoiler:Izanagi-no-Okami]] lost some meaning in the English version. In Japanese, the first kana of each of the Personas used in the fusion[[note]]Izanagi, Sandman, Nata Tashi, Girimehkala, Norn, Okuninushi, Orthrus, Kartikeya, Mithra, Tzitzimitl, Cu Cuhlainn and Legion[[/note]] spell out "[[spoiler:Izanagi-no-ookami-tsukure]]", literally meaning "[[spoiler:create Izanagi-no-Okami]]". This almost barely works in English: the first one or two letters of the first few Personas spell out [[spoiler:Isanaginoookami]], but the names of the last few Personas simply don't translate, and the meaning is lost.

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*** The Personas used to fuse [[spoiler:Izanagi-no-Okami]] lost some meaning in the English version. In Japanese, the first kana of each of the Personas used in the fusion[[note]]Izanagi, Sandman, Nata Tashi, Girimehkala, Norn, Okuninushi, Orthrus, Kartikeya, Mithra, Tzitzimitl, Cu Cuhlainn and Legion[[/note]] spell out "[[spoiler:Izanagi-no-ookami-tsukure]]", literally meaning "[[spoiler:create Izanagi-no-Okami]]". This almost barely works in English: the first one or two letters of the first few Personas spell out [[spoiler:Isanaginoookami]], but the names of the last few Personas simply don't translate, and the meaning is lost.lost, making it harder to see why it's made from Personas with little in common in their level, arcana or origins.

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** In the English dub, Kimimaro calls Kabuto "Kabuto-sensei," as though the latter were his teacher. While every other use of "sensei" in the series is from a student to a teacher, he's actually addressing Kabuto as a doctor, something that the localization of the manga got correct.


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** When the localized manga shows the results of the Provisional Hero License exam, a close-up of the names of those who passed shows a name that starts with T coming immediately after a name that starts with N on the listings. The notes in the margins of the page had to explain that in Japanese, the latter name would be close to the former in the alphabet, and then spells out the point of that panel- [[spoiler:Todoroki's name isn't on the list]].

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