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* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix a vague and largely ecumenical theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.

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* Madeleine L'Engle's books have some Later Installment Weirdness to go with their usual weirdness.
''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix a vague and largely ecumenical theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.



* The first 3 seasons of MTV's ''Series/{{Awkward}}'' were run by series creator Lauren Iungerich, who had a natural, realistic vision for the show. After her departure, the show received new showrunners who made the show a more dramatic, stereotypical high school soap opera. [[spoiler: Most notably there was a plot about new girl Eva turning out to be a psychopathic StalkerWithACrush for Matty with a fake identity and FakePregnancy to pull TheBabyTrap on him. This plot might have worked on a regular teen show where drama happens all the time, like ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', but it was ludicrous on ''Awkward.'']]

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* The first 3 three seasons of MTV's ''Series/{{Awkward}}'' were run by series creator Lauren Iungerich, who had a natural, realistic vision for the show. After her departure, the show received new showrunners who made the show a more dramatic, stereotypical high school soap opera. [[spoiler: Most notably there was a plot about new girl Eva turning out to be a psychopathic StalkerWithACrush for Matty with a fake identity and FakePregnancy to pull TheBabyTrap on him. This plot might have worked on a regular teen show where drama happens all the time, like ''Series/BeverlyHills90210'', but it was ludicrous on ''Awkward.'']]


* Towards the end of his career, Creator/WilliamShakespeare began to [[GenreBusting push against the rigid genre tropes]] of his day, blending comedy and tragedy to such a degree that many modern scholars have started using new terms like "tragicomedy" or "romance" to describe so-called "problem plays" such as ''Theatre/TheWintersTale'', ''Theatre/{{Cymbeline}}'', and ''Theatre/TheTempest''. Several of the Bard's later plays also incorporate supernatural elements in a way that's almost closer to MagicalRealism than the straightforward fantasy of earlier works, and it was during this period that he wrote one of only three of his plays -- ''The Tempest'' -- without any known pre-existing source material (the others are ''Theatre/LovesLaboursLost'' and ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream''). Finally, many of Shakespeare's late works are collaborative efforts -- though this was also [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness something he did a lot early in his career]], and was a common practice for playwrights at the time.

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* Towards the end of his career, Creator/WilliamShakespeare began to [[GenreBusting push against the rigid genre tropes]] of his day, blending comedy and tragedy to such a degree that many modern scholars have started using new terms like "tragicomedy" or "romance" to describe so-called "problem plays" such as ''Theatre/TheWintersTale'', ''Theatre/{{Cymbeline}}'', and ''Theatre/TheTempest''. Several of the Bard's later plays also incorporate supernatural elements in a way that's almost closer to MagicalRealism than the straightforward fantasy of earlier works, and it was during this period that he wrote one of only three of his plays -- ''The Tempest'' -- without any known pre-existing source material (the others are ''Theatre/LovesLaboursLost'' and ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream''). Finally, many of Shakespeare's late works are collaborative efforts -- though this was also [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness something he did a lot early in his career]], and was a common practice for playwrights at the time.



* The 90s figures of ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' had [[DenserAndWackier noticeably more wacky and neon-coloured figures]] as it went on. The final year of the toyline reimagined the Joes as a group of almost literal [[SpaceMarine space marines]] fighting a race of transforming aliens called the Lunartix Empire.

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* The 90s 90's figures of ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' had [[DenserAndWackier noticeably more wacky and neon-coloured figures]] as it went on. The final year of the toyline reimagined the Joes as a group of almost literal [[SpaceMarine space marines]] fighting a race of transforming aliens called the Lunartix Empire.



** Near its end, the ''Franchise/TransformersGeneration1'' toyline largely gave up on having toys that "just" transformed, the line being dominated by increasingly gimmicky sublines such as the Headmasters/Targetmasters/Powermasters (Transformers that came with a small partner that drove them in vehicle mode and became their head/blaster/engine in robot mode), the Pretenders (small, simple Transformers hidden in a large unarticulated plastic figure), the Micromasters (tiny ''Toys/MicroMachines''-esque figures), and most infamously, the Action Masters (slightly better-articulated Transformers... ''that don't transform'').

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** Near its end, the ''Franchise/TransformersGeneration1'' toyline toy line largely gave up on having toys that "just" transformed, the line being dominated by increasingly gimmicky sublines such as the Headmasters/Targetmasters/Powermasters (Transformers that came with a small partner that drove them in vehicle mode and became their head/blaster/engine in robot mode), the Pretenders (small, simple Transformers hidden in a large unarticulated plastic figure), the Micromasters (tiny ''Toys/MicroMachines''-esque figures), and most infamously, the Action Masters (slightly better-articulated Transformers... ''that don't transform'').



** The ponies were generally shaped like ponies - or on occasion, full-sized horses - during the first three generations, barring some of the more unusual types of ponies (such as the seaponies, which were [[MixAndMatchCritters part pony and part seahorse]]). Starting with the tail end of the third generation however, the ponies have become more and more heavily stylized, with bigger, rounder heads and smaller bodies. Many collectors refuse to collect the newer ponies, because [[InformedSpecies they no longer look like ponies]]. [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic G4]] ponies are often accused of resembling deer, or on occasion, ''cats''.
** The earlier generations also tended to include a short story about the pony, or a blurb describing it, on the back of its packaging. This was largely dropped sometime during generation 4. This leaves toy-exclusive characters much more mysterious than before - Princess Gold Lily and Princess Sterling raised a particularly large number of questions among fans, due to the fact that the canon indicates that they probably shouldn't exist (since every princess we've seen in the show has generally been a GodEmperor of some sort, so you'd think we'd have heard about these two by now if they were around).

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** The ponies were generally shaped like ponies - -- or on occasion, full-sized horses - -- during the first three generations, barring some of the more unusual types of ponies (such as the seaponies, which were [[MixAndMatchCritters part pony and part seahorse]]). Starting with the tail end of the third generation however, the ponies have become more and more heavily stylized, with bigger, rounder heads and smaller bodies. Many collectors refuse to collect the newer ponies, because [[InformedSpecies they no longer look like ponies]]. [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic G4]] ponies are often accused of resembling deer, or on occasion, ''cats''.
** The earlier generations also tended to include a short story about the pony, or a blurb describing it, on the back of its packaging. This was largely dropped sometime during generation 4. This leaves toy-exclusive characters much more mysterious than before - before. Princess Gold Lily and Princess Sterling raised a particularly large number of questions among fans, due to the fact that the canon indicates that they probably shouldn't exist (since every princess we've seen in the show has generally been a GodEmperor of some sort, so you'd think we'd have heard about these two by now if they were around).


* ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears'' began to enter this territory with the later books. While the stories didn't get overly preachy, political and even religious content began to creep into a degree that had not been present before. While the earlier books had never denied that a grown-up world apart from Brother's and Sister's childhood experiences existed in Bear Country, the mature issues had always been only fleetingly and non-specifically mentioned, and Brother and Sister themselves were never involved in them (such as when Mama and Papa have to get them a babysitter because they're going to a political meeting for the day). But a later book had Sister use the word "sexist" (which should not even be part of her vocabulary yet) and ''The Big Question'' has outright references to God!
* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. It's also the only book without any [[FictionalSport Quidditch]]. Fittingly [[Film/HarryPotter the films]] are an example too - as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.

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* ''Literature/TheBerenstainBears'' began to enter this territory with the later books. While the stories didn't get overly preachy, political and even religious content began to creep into a degree that had not been present before. While the earlier books had never denied that a grown-up world apart from Brother's and Sister's childhood experiences existed in Bear Country, the mature issues had always been only fleetingly and non-specifically mentioned, and Brother and Sister themselves were never involved in them (such as when Mama and Papa have to get them a babysitter because they're going to a political meeting for the day). But a later book had Sister use the word "sexist" (which should not even be part of her vocabulary yet) and ''The Big Question'' has outright references to God!
later books are explicitly Christian.
* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on in Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. It's also the only book without any [[FictionalSport Quidditch]]. Fittingly [[Film/HarryPotter the films]] are an example too - -- as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.films (plus the same points that were present in the book).

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* As ''Series/TwentyOneJumpStreet'' reached the end of its run and lost more original cast members, the series still focused mainly on campus cases, but mixed in episodes strictly dealing with adult perps, such as "Shirts and Skins," which was about the murder of a neo-Nazi leader amid the conflict between his group's two factions, with a side plot featuring the anti-racism vigilantes (led by a middle-aged man, no less) who turned out to be NotSoDifferent from the neo-Nazis.

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* Later day ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' entries have decided to push the envelope as to what to include. Starting with ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWarsJudgment'', we have seen PoweredArmor users (''Anime/TekkamanBlade''), cyborgs (''Anime/{{Iczer}}''), battleships (''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato2199''), magical girls (''Manga/MagicKnightRayearth'') ''kaiju'' (''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}''), live-action heroes (''Series/KyoryuSentaiZyuranger'') idol singers (''VideoGame/TheIdolmaster'') and even '''''Franchise/MegaMan'''''.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' was heavily beloved with its ''Shadowbringers'' expansion pack, but there was one thing that shocked and disappointed fans -- new jobs Gunbreaker and Dancer did not have any awesome looking gear for anything below Level 60 and even there, the only Level 60 gear you get is the Shire gear from the very end of ''Heavensward'', so fans couldn't get Gunblades who chirp "Kupo!" upon unsheathing or chakrams infused with the power of Nidhogg.


* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' anime zigzags with this, due to the show being a LongRunner and often having to [[MerchandiseDriven adapt the conventions of the newer games]]:

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* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' anime zigzags with this, due to the show being a LongRunner {{Long Runner|s}} and often having to [[MerchandiseDriven adapt the conventions of the newer games]]:



* The 1980s saw [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/marveldatabase/images/6/65/Marvel_Age_Vol_1_57.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20090909130820 a LOT]] of shakeups at Creator/MarvelComics. Characters went through various costume changes (Comicbook/SpiderMan getting a [[Comicbook/{{Venom}} black alien costume]], Comicbook/IronMan's classic red and gold suit being done away with in favor of the Silver Centurion armor, the Comicbook/FantasticFour trading in their blue uniforms for new black and white ones, [[Comicbook/TheMightyThor Thor]] growing a beard and switching out his classic costume for an armored suit, and Comicbook/CaptainAmerica donning a black suit and changing his name to simply "The Captain"), line-up changes (while some in the oughts thought Spider-Man and Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} being made members of the Comicbook/NewAvengers was odd, there was a time where Mr. Fantastic and the Invisible Woman left the Fantastic Four to almost immediately become Avengers!), locale and status quo changes (like the time the Comicbook/XMen were thought dead, but were actually hiding out in the Australian Outback, or when Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk turned gray, relocated to Las Vegas and became a leg breaker for TheMafia), the works!

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* The 1980s saw [[https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/marveldatabase/images/6/65/Marvel_Age_Vol_1_57.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20090909130820 a LOT]] of shakeups at Creator/MarvelComics. Characters went through various costume changes (Comicbook/SpiderMan (Franchise/SpiderMan getting a [[Comicbook/{{Venom}} black alien costume]], Comicbook/IronMan's classic red and gold suit being done away with in favor of the Silver Centurion armor, the Comicbook/FantasticFour trading in their blue uniforms for new black and white ones, [[Comicbook/TheMightyThor Thor]] growing a beard and switching out his classic costume for an armored suit, and Comicbook/CaptainAmerica donning a black suit and changing his name to simply "The Captain"), line-up changes (while some in the oughts thought Spider-Man and Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} Franchise/{{Wolverine}} being made members of the Comicbook/NewAvengers was odd, there was a time where Mr. Fantastic and the Invisible Woman left the Fantastic Four to almost immediately become Avengers!), locale and status quo changes (like the time the Comicbook/XMen were thought dead, but were actually hiding out in the Australian Outback, or when Comicbook/TheIncredibleHulk the Comicbook/IncredibleHulk turned gray, relocated to Las Vegas and became a leg breaker for TheMafia), the works!



* ''Film/HomeAlone''. Both ''Home Alone 4'' and ''Home Alone 5'' differ significantly from the first three, starting with the fact that both are TV movies that were made without John Hughes' involvement. ''4'' recasts the original characters with different actors and {{Retcon}}s a lot of the family's original dynamics (the parents are divorced, Kevin's older siblings are closer to his own age), Harry is replaced with Marv's girlfriend, while Marv looks and acts like Harry. ''5'' was made well after the series was considered finished, and involves an entirely different cast of characters (much like ''3'', but John Hughes wrote and produced that one).

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* ''Film/HomeAlone''. Both ''Home Alone 4'' and ''Home Alone 5'' differ significantly from the first three, starting with the fact that both are TV movies that were made without John Hughes' Creator/JohnHughes' involvement. ''4'' recasts the original characters with different actors and {{Retcon}}s a lot of the family's original dynamics (the parents are divorced, Kevin's older siblings are closer to his own age), Harry is replaced with Marv's girlfriend, while Marv looks and acts like Harry. ''5'' was made well after the series was considered finished, and involves an entirely different cast of characters (much like ''3'', but John Hughes wrote and produced that one).



* ''Series/WheelOfFortune''

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* ''Series/WheelOfFortune''''Series/WheelOfFortune'':



* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. It's also the only book without any [[FictionalSport Quidditch]].
** Fittingly the films are an example too - as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.

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* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. It's also the only book without any [[FictionalSport Quidditch]]. \n** Fittingly [[Film/HarryPotter the films films]] are an example too - as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.



* ''Series/{{Angel}}'''s fifth and final season involved the protagonists running the BigBad organization Wolfram & Hart. Due to budget cuts, a much greater portion of the episodes took place during the daytime, and {{Long Runn|er}}ing actress Charisma Carpenter was largely absent. Additionally, Creator/JamesMarsters was transplanted to the show for this season following the series finale of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' (taking Carpenter's spot in the opening credits).

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* ''Series/{{Angel}}'''s fifth and final season involved the protagonists running the BigBad organization Wolfram & Hart. Due to budget cuts, a much greater portion of the episodes took place during the daytime, and {{Long Runn|er}}ing Runn|ers}}ing actress Charisma Carpenter Creator/CharismaCarpenter was largely absent. Additionally, Creator/JamesMarsters was transplanted to the show for this season following the series finale of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' (taking Carpenter's spot in the opening credits).



* ''Series/{{Baywatch}} Nights'': The series started as a SpinOff of the original ''Baywatch'' with a GenreShift towards detective stories, with Mitch and other characters opening a detective agency and solving mysteries. Soon afterwards it did a ReTool [[FollowTheLeader following the then-leader]] that was ''Series/TheXFiles'' and had the characters (veteran lifeguards and police officers ''before'' becoming P.Is.) battling supernatural [[MonsterOfTheWeek Monsters Of The Week]]. It was cancelled shortly after.

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* ''Series/{{Baywatch}} Nights'': The series started as a SpinOff of the original ''Baywatch'' with a GenreShift towards detective stories, with Mitch and other characters opening a detective agency and solving mysteries. Soon afterwards it did a ReTool [[FollowTheLeader following the then-leader]] that was ''Series/TheXFiles'' and had the characters (veteran lifeguards and police officers ''before'' becoming P.Is.) battling supernatural [[MonsterOfTheWeek Monsters Of The of the Week]]. It was cancelled shortly after.



* The final season of ''Series/{{Bramwell}}'' is vastly different from the others—only two 2-hour episodes, that focus on her caring for new army recruits rather than her typical hospital work, her father and new stepmother vanish without explanation, while her behavior becomes foolish and irresponsible, culminating in her being fired from the Thrift, the hospital she started.



** '''Season 9 (1987-1988)''': Several new characters, most notably Sherrie Krenn (Austin, the future country singer) as Australian foreign exchange student Pippa [=McKenna=]. The series was still (amazingly) going strong, and it was finally several of the key cast members -- most notably Mindy Cohn and Nancy [=McKeon=] -- deciding to leave after the end of the season that put the kabosh on the most radical changes of them all for a planned Season 10: An {{Aftershow}} -- based on the two-part Season 9 finale, wherein Blair learns that Eastland is in severe financial trouble and uses her wealth to purchase the assets of Eastland, then becomes the school's headmistress -- with a bunch of all-new students (played by then-child stars Mayim Bialik, Seth Green and Juliette Lewis) that would have made the show essentially reminiscent of the first two seasons.

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** '''Season 9 (1987-1988)''': Several new characters, most notably Sherrie Krenn (Austin, the future country singer) as Australian foreign exchange student Pippa [=McKenna=]. The series was still (amazingly) going strong, and it was finally several of the key cast members -- most notably Mindy Cohn and Nancy [=McKeon=] -- deciding to leave after the end of the season that put the kabosh on the most radical changes of them all for a planned Season 10: An {{Aftershow}} -- based on the two-part Season 9 finale, wherein Blair learns that Eastland is in severe financial trouble and uses her wealth to purchase the assets of Eastland, then becomes the school's headmistress -- with a bunch of all-new students (played by then-child stars Mayim Bialik, Seth Green Creator/MayimBialik, Creator/SethGreen and Juliette Lewis) that would have made the show essentially reminiscent of the first two seasons.



* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': The final season, barring the last two episodes, [[ExtremelyShortTimespan takes place over the course of three days]] while all previous seasons took place over a year (usually from September to May). As the main cast stay at the the Farhampton Inn [[spoiler:for the wedding of Barney and Robin]], the familliar [=MacLaren=]'s Pub only appears in a few flashbacks.

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* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': The final season, barring the last two episodes, [[ExtremelyShortTimespan takes place over the course of three days]] while all previous seasons took place over a year (usually from September to May). As the main cast stay at the the Farhampton Inn [[spoiler:for the wedding of Barney and Robin]], the familliar familiar [=MacLaren=]'s Pub only appears in a few flashbacks.



* ''Series/LaFemmeNikita'' (not to be confused with the CW drama simply named ''Nikita'') got a short PostScriptSeason after being UnCancelled. Apparently a lot of the actors had gone their separate ways, because some major characters either vanished or died, and even with replacements the cast was smaller. Even one actor who remained played a different character ([[spoiler: Birkoff's twin brother from a prior episode replaces him after his death.]]) Also, Michael's role is quite different than in seasons past. Even in scenes when most of the faces onscreen are ones you know, the world after the events of the intended SeriesFinale is ''not'' the one you know.
* ''Series/MacGyver'': A mild example is the last seasons: while it remained a show about a ScienceHero (and the TropeNamer for MacGyvering), situations where he had to use his skills included defusing a ScoobyDooHoax regarding Bigfoot, a TimeTravel OrWasItADream episode where he went back to the Middle Ages and had to adventure alongside Merlin, an adventure that took place ''in the afterlife''.

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* ''Series/LaFemmeNikita'' (not to be confused with the CW drama simply named ''Nikita'') got a short PostScriptSeason after being UnCancelled.UnCanceled. Apparently a lot of the actors had gone their separate ways, because some major characters either vanished or died, and even with replacements the cast was smaller. Even one actor who remained played a different character ([[spoiler: Birkoff's twin brother from a prior episode replaces him after his death.]]) Also, Michael's role is quite different than in seasons past. Even in scenes when most of the faces onscreen are ones you know, the world after the events of the intended SeriesFinale is ''not'' the one you know.
* ''Series/MacGyver'': ''Series/{{MacGyver|1985}}'': A mild example is the last seasons: while it remained a show about a ScienceHero (and the TropeNamer {{Trope Namer|s}} for MacGyvering), situations where he had to use his skills included defusing a ScoobyDooHoax regarding Bigfoot, a TimeTravel OrWasItADream episode where he went back to the Middle Ages and had to adventure alongside Merlin, an adventure that took place ''in the afterlife''.



** The frequent {{Friendship Moment}}s between Leslie and Ann are completely absentt, following the latter's departure.

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** The frequent {{Friendship Moment}}s between Leslie and Ann are completely absentt, absent, following the latter's departure.



* The concept of the show ''Promised Land'' (a SpinOff of ''Series/TouchedByAnAngel'') had the Greene family traveling around the country to help people, but in the show's third and final season, they settled permanently into a community by the final season.



* The last two seasons of ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' have often been panned by viewers and critics alike; with the departure of series co-creator and ShowRunner Larry David, many complained that the storylines became increasingly absurd, far-fetched, and unbelievable.

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* The last two seasons of ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' have often been panned by viewers and critics alike; with the departure of series co-creator and ShowRunner Larry David, Creator/LarryDavid, many complained that the storylines became increasingly absurd, far-fetched, and unbelievable.



* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', during the fifth season, changed the logo [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsxgcLf0TSY to give it a swoosh]] similar to ''Film/SupermanTheMovie''. It was removed the following season.

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
** The logo was changed
during the fifth season, changed the logo [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsxgcLf0TSY to give it a swoosh]] similar to ''Film/SupermanTheMovie''. It was removed the following season.



* Not that Series/TwinPeaks wasn't weird to begin with but its third season completely abandons all the whacky soap-opera elements and turns into a full-on CosmicHorrorStory full of BodyHorror, NightmareFuel and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking a lot of]] [[ClusterFBomb swearing]]. Airing on adult-only Showtime instead of the original Creator/{{ABC}} helps.

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* Not that Series/TwinPeaks ''Series/TwinPeaks'' wasn't weird to begin with but its third season completely abandons all the whacky soap-opera elements and turns into a full-on CosmicHorrorStory full of BodyHorror, NightmareFuel and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking a lot of]] [[ClusterFBomb swearing]]. Airing on adult-only Showtime instead of the original Creator/{{ABC}} helps.



* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C3%A9l%C3%A9roman teleroman]] ''Virginie'' had a weird case of LongRunnerCastTurnover in 2007 when the CharacterTitle [[PassingTheTorch passed the torch]] to a younger Virginie teaching at the same school. The show was running since September 1996 and already broke the longevity record for Quebec fictionalized television with its 1221'st episode in 2006 when the actress decided to quit.



* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C3%A9l%C3%A9roman teleroman]] ''Virginie'' had a weird case of LongRunnerCastTurnover in 2007 when the CharacterTitle [[PassingTheTorch passed the torch]] to a younger Virginie teaching at the same school. The show was running since september 1996 and already broke the longevity record for Quebec fictionalized television with its 1221'st episode in 2006 when the actress decided to quit.



* The concept of the show ''Promised Land'' (a SpinOff of ''Series/TouchedByAnAngel'') had the Greene family traveling around the country to help people, but in the show's third and final season, they settled permanently into a community by the final season.
* The final season of ''Series/{{Bramwell}}'' is vastly different from the others—only two 2-hour episodes, that focus on her caring for new army recruits rather than her typical hospital work, her father and new stepmother vanish without explanation, while her behavior becomes foolish and irresponsible, culminating in her being fired from the Thrift, the hospital she started.



* ''Magazine/DisneyAdventures'' seemed to shift away from the "Disney" half of its name in the 21st century, likely due to the animated films going through a DorkAge and the Creator/DisneyChannel shifting its focus toward kidcoms. The articles became much shorter, celeb cameos rarer, and the comics became much of an afterthought consisting solely of a few original properties with little or no Disney flavor (compared to the magazine's prime, when they included comic adaptations of Disney properties, along with reprints of licensed ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' comics and even excerpts from ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}''). It even got to the point where issues would center on a non-Disney property, such as ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''.

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* ''Magazine/DisneyAdventures'' seemed to shift away from the "Disney" "Creator/{{Disney}}" half of its name in the 21st century, likely due to the animated films going through a DorkAge and the Creator/DisneyChannel shifting its focus toward kidcoms. The articles became much shorter, celeb cameos rarer, and the comics became much of an afterthought consisting solely of a few original properties with little or no Disney flavor (compared to the magazine's prime, when they included comic adaptations of Disney properties, along with reprints of licensed ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' comics and even excerpts from ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}''). It even got to the point where issues would center on a non-Disney property, such as ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''.



* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}''

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* ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}''''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'':



*** Though Starmen no longer appear, temporary invincibility is still possible through scanning any Mario Amiibo[[note]]This includes Mario, [[Franchise/SuperSmashBros Smash]] Mario, 8-bit Mario (classic or modern), Gold or Silver Mario, and yes, Wedding Mario.[[/note]].

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*** Though Starmen no longer appear, temporary invincibility is still possible through scanning any Mario Amiibo[[note]]This includes Mario, [[Franchise/SuperSmashBros [[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Smash]] Mario, 8-bit Mario (classic or modern), Gold or Silver Mario, and yes, Wedding Mario.[[/note]].



** ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeFederationForce'' is a linear, team-based, mission-based multiplayer FPS with very few puzzle elements, no permanent upgrades (aside from optoinal [=MODs=]), very little possibility of exploration, and focuses on the Galactic Federation Marine Corp rather than Samus Aran.

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** ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeFederationForce'' is a linear, team-based, mission-based multiplayer FPS with very few puzzle elements, no permanent upgrades (aside from optoinal optional [=MODs=]), very little possibility of exploration, and focuses on the Galactic Federation Marine Corp rather than Samus Aran.



** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', in addition to replacing the [=HM=] system with Ride Pokémon, ditches the "gym" system of previous games in favor of "Island Trials." Instead of facing eight bosses before facing an EliteFour and Champion trainer, you now do a series of eleven trials where instead of fighting a small number of trainers before facing a boss, you instead partake in a number of various tasks before hand. And instead of a trainer, you fight a [[KingMook Totem Pokémon]]: a powerful, intelligent Pokémon that will call for an ally during battle, placing you into a 2 v. 1 fight. Also unlike gyms, trials cannot be left once you start them. After completing all the trials on a particular island (except for the last one), you fight the Island Kahuna in a traditional battle before proceeding to the next island. The [[BossRush Pokémon League]] is done a little differently as well: while battling the Elite Four is the same, the FinalBoss [[spoiler:is a randomly-chosen trainer from a pool of trainers (after the first two runs), since ''you'' are the Champion and are now defending your title.]] The National Pokédex is gone as well, leaving over half the Pokémon without their numbers in their summaries and removing any incentive for catching a lot of post-game only Pokémon.

to:

** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', in addition to replacing the [=HM=] system with Ride Pokémon, ditches the "gym" system of previous games in favor of "Island Trials." Instead of facing eight bosses before facing an EliteFour and Champion trainer, you now do a series of eleven trials where instead of fighting a small number of trainers before facing a boss, you instead partake in a number of various tasks before hand. And instead of a trainer, you fight a [[KingMook Totem Pokémon]]: a powerful, intelligent Pokémon that will call for an ally during battle, placing you into a 2 v. 1 fight. Also unlike gyms, trials cannot be left once you start them. After completing all the trials on a particular island (except for the last one), you fight the Island Kahuna in a traditional battle before proceeding to the next island. The [[BossRush Pokémon League]] is done a little differently as well: while battling the Elite Four is the same, the FinalBoss [[spoiler:is a randomly-chosen trainer from a pool of trainers (after the first two runs), since ''you'' are the Champion and are now defending your title.]] title]]. The National Pokédex is gone as well, leaving over half the Pokémon without their numbers in their summaries and removing any incentive for catching a lot of post-game only Pokémon.



* The first few ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' games were about members of LaResistance in Europe and/or OSS members fighting the Germans BehindEnemyLines, usually in the form of a StealthBasedMission. Starting with ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAlliedAssault'' however, it became more [[ActionizedSequel actionized]], complete with fighting on the frontline alongside American Paratroopers and Army Rangers. Then the final few installments, namely ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'' and ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'', removed the OSS and Resistance aspect entirely, and instead focused on [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous elite soldiers and Marines]] fighting in Europe and The Pacific, with nary a Stealth mission seen... and then the series performed a TimeSkip (even having characters that were descendants of those who appeared on the first games) and managed two games set during TheWarOnTerror (''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor2010'' and ''Medal Of Honor: Warfighter'', which was also more arcade-style in game play) before [[FranchiseKiller seemingly giving up the ghost]].

to:

* The first few ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'' games were about members of LaResistance in Europe and/or OSS members fighting the Germans BehindEnemyLines, usually in the form of a StealthBasedMission. Starting with ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAlliedAssault'' however, it became more [[ActionizedSequel actionized]], {{actionized|Sequel}}, complete with fighting on the frontline alongside American Paratroopers and Army Rangers. Then the final few installments, namely ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorPacificAssault'', ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorVanguard'' and ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonorAirborne'', removed the OSS and Resistance aspect entirely, and instead focused on [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous elite soldiers and Marines]] fighting in Europe and The Pacific, with nary a Stealth mission seen... and then the series performed a TimeSkip (even having characters that were descendants of those who appeared on the first games) and managed two games set during TheWarOnTerror (''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor2010'' and ''Medal Of Honor: Warfighter'', which was also more arcade-style in game play) before [[FranchiseKiller seemingly giving up the ghost]].



* The later episodes of ''WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic'''s first run definitely qualify as this, starting with the ''Film/MoulinRouge'' review in November 2011 (the point where the show's creator Creator/DougWalker realized that he was ready to move on from the Critic). From there the reviews became more analytical as opposed to just fake ranting, he started covering more high profile nostalgic films (such as ''Film/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas'' and ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheTempleOfDoom''), and most of the videos became either crossovers with other Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses reviewers or filled with cameos up until the end of the show's run in June 2012 (and [[WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee the official end of the character]] in August). The episodes done after the series' [[{{Uncancelled}} revival]] in February 2013 have more or less picked up this approach, with the addition of a larger cast and the Critic reviewing newer, non-nostalgic films as well. The episodes made after the return also use much less footage of the film being reviewed, occasionally abandoning it entirely in favor of sketches done in the style of the movie (usually when covering a movie still in theaters).

to:

* The later episodes of ''WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic'''s first run definitely qualify as this, starting with the ''Film/MoulinRouge'' review in November 2011 (the point where the show's creator Creator/DougWalker realized that he was ready to move on from the Critic). From there the reviews became more analytical as opposed to just fake ranting, he started covering more high profile nostalgic films (such as ''Film/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas'' and ''Film/IndianaJonesAndTheTempleOfDoom''), and most of the videos became either crossovers with other Website/ThatGuyWithTheGlasses reviewers or filled with cameos up until the end of the show's run in June 2012 (and [[WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee the official end of the character]] in August). The episodes done after the series' [[{{Uncancelled}} [[{{Uncanceled}} revival]] in February 2013 have more or less picked up this approach, with the addition of a larger cast and the Critic reviewing newer, non-nostalgic films as well. The episodes made after the return also use much less footage of the film being reviewed, occasionally abandoning it entirely in favor of sketches done in the style of the movie (usually when covering a movie still in theaters).



* ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'': The show had ended its initial run, while still be very popular, and since its popularity was still evident, Creator/CartoonNetwork decided to revive it a few years later. Original creator, Genndy Tartakovsky, was busy with ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' and ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', so production was turned over to Chris Savino; not only did all of the characters look significantly different, but the series also went through a ''lot'' of {{Retcon}}ning as well, contradicting the previous incarnation of the series. For example Mandark's backstory and even given name were severely retconned. They also scrapped his little sister Olga.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' was finally UnCanceled for ten episodes, allowing Tartakovsky to wrap up the story. It's set fifty years after the rest of the series (revealing that Jack [[TheAgeless no longer ages]]), is [[CerebusSyndrome even darker than the previous seasons]], has more continuity and now features a {{Deuteragonist}} named Ashi, who goes [[HeelFaceTurn from villain]] to LoveInterest as the story progresses.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/DextersLaboratory'': The show had ended its initial run, while still be very popular, and since its popularity was still evident, Creator/CartoonNetwork decided to revive it a few years later. Original creator, Genndy Tartakovsky, Creator/GenndyTartakovsky, was busy with ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' and ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'', so production was turned over to Chris Savino; Creator/ChrisSavino; not only did all of the characters look significantly different, but the series also went through a ''lot'' of {{Retcon}}ning as well, contradicting the previous incarnation of the series. For example Mandark's backstory and even given name were severely retconned. They also scrapped his little sister Olga.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' was finally UnCanceled for ten episodes, allowing Tartakovsky to wrap up the story. It's set fifty years Disney already took a lot of liberties with ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'' after its ChannelHop to ABC, but the rest last season in particular devoted a ''lot'' of airtime to Quailman, with some episodes just being straight-up Quailman from start to finish without so much as a wraparound giving it relevance to Doug's life.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone'' Reconstructs this. The closing points
of the series (revealing that Jack [[TheAgeless no longer ages]]), is [[CerebusSyndrome even darker than play closer to the previous seasons]], has EarlyInstallmentWeirdness of the pilot episode, downplaying the slapstick VillainProtagonist formula in favour of developing mythos and new worlds and giving the heroes more continuity focus. Some characters, particularly Rufus and now features a {{Deuteragonist}} named Ashi, who goes [[HeelFaceTurn from villain]] to LoveInterest as Amberley, also gained back shades of [[CharacterizationMarchesOn their initial personalities]] and the story progresses. more madcap humour began to seep onto the non-Urpney characters more.



* Season 5 of ''WesternAnimation/TheGarfieldShow'' begins with ''seven'' consecutive five-part episodes aired back to back (covering 12 and a half out of the 26 episodes of the season[[note]]The show airs in a TwoShorts format, so an episode actually covers two parts of the 5-parter, or the last one of a 5-parter and the first of the one after[[/note]]), and also almost every episode during these 5-parters features a song (something that already happened only in multiparter episodes, but since they were fewer in earlier seasons it wasn't so noticeable)



* MGM Cartoons:

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* MGM Creator/{{M|etroGoldwynMayer}}GM Cartoons:



* After the movie, Craig [=McCracken=] left ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' to create ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends''. Chris Savino took over, and the show became more or less a gag comedy instead of a lighthearted action show. The characters also received noticeable redesigns to fit the movie's art-style. In ''The Powerpuff Girls Rule'', a Ten Year Anniversary for them, they used Flash instead of traditional animation.

to:

* Those who left ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' behind after its initial hay day will be surprised by how much has changed from season six onward. Who is this [[HeelFaceTurn Starlight Glimmer?]] When did Rainbow Dash become a Wonderbolt? When did the Mane Six open a school? [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyTheMovie2017 Where did those hippogriffs come from?]] When did the Cutie Mark Crusades stop being NotAllowedToGrowUp? Granted, the change has been gradual, and it's just what happens when you have a show where characters actually grow and change over time. Non-plot related changes also exist. For example, Creator/LaurenFaust tried to make it a point to avoid "human poses" and [[FurryReminder make sure that]], despite their culture and civilization, the characters [[PartiallyCivilizedAnimal weren't]] just four-legged humans. Later seasons made without her diverge from this DependingOnTheWriter, with more "human poses" and more "characters inexplicably holding things despite [[FingerlessHands having hooves]]".
* After the movie, Craig [=McCracken=] ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirlsMovie'', Creator/CraigMcCracken left ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' to create ''WesternAnimation/FostersHomeForImaginaryFriends''. Chris Savino took over, and the show became more or less a gag comedy instead of a lighthearted action show. The characters also received noticeable redesigns to fit the movie's art-style. In ''The Powerpuff Girls Rule'', a Ten Year Anniversary for them, they used Flash instead of traditional animation.



** After the second season, Creator/JohnKricfalusi was fired for not meeting episode deadlines and ([[WordOfGod according to Kricfalusi himself]]) going overboard with the show's violent content via the infamous oar-beating scene in "Man's Best Friend". Nickelodeon created its own animation studio (Games Animation), and Bob Camp took over as showrunner. The art style and designs were altered slightly and some voices changed (largely due to Billy West replacing Kricfalusi for certain characters), i.e. Ren sounding more breathy and less hammy. Ren went from a JerkWithAHeartOfGold to a JerkWithAHeartOfJerk, and Stimpy went from merely TheDitz to TooDumbToLive. The Games staff even made an episode parodying the creation of the show and the change in staff ("Reverend Jack"). The tones of the episodes also changed; this was both at the request of Nick (who told Bob Camp, "no more psycho-dramas") and Camp himself, who didn't feel it was healthy to endlessly ask, "What would John K. do?" and instead just wanted to make funny cartoons.
** And then there's ''Adults Party Cartoon'' which, in a reversal of before, returned John K to creative control but lacked Camp and several other members of the original show's staff. While it undid some of the alterations from Camp's tenure, it has an ''even more'' deranged animation style, far more blatant adult humour and the duo's relationship is openly homoerotic.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'': Between the first and second movies, creator Stephen Hillenburg, retired as supervising director and Paul Tibbitt took over. In addition, most of the show's original writing staff left to work on other cartoons. The new writing staff had little to no experience with the charcters, and as a result, the entire main cast was Flanderized to ridiculous extremes. Following Hillenburg's return (even after his death in 2018), the show delved more into WildTake humour.

to:

** After the second season, Creator/JohnKricfalusi was fired [[ScheduleSlip for not meeting episode deadlines deadlines]] and ([[WordOfGod according to Kricfalusi himself]]) going overboard with the show's violent content via the infamous oar-beating scene in "Man's Best Friend". Nickelodeon Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} created its own animation studio (Games Animation), and Bob Camp took over as showrunner. The art style and designs were altered slightly and some voices changed (largely due to Billy West Creator/BillyWest replacing Kricfalusi for certain characters), i.e. Ren sounding more breathy and less hammy. Ren went from a JerkWithAHeartOfGold to a JerkWithAHeartOfJerk, and Stimpy went from merely TheDitz to TooDumbToLive. The Games staff even made an episode parodying the creation of the show and the change in staff ("Reverend Jack"). The tones of the episodes also changed; this was both at the request of Nick (who told Bob Camp, "no more psycho-dramas") and Camp himself, who didn't feel it was healthy to endlessly ask, "What would John K. do?" and instead just wanted to make funny cartoons.
** And then there's ''Adults ''[[WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpyAdultPartyCartoon Adult Party Cartoon'' Cartoon]]'' which, in a reversal of before, returned John K to creative control but lacked Camp and several other members of the original show's staff. While it undid some of the alterations from Camp's tenure, it has an ''even more'' deranged animation style, far more blatant adult humour and the duo's relationship is openly homoerotic.
* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' was finally UnCanceled for ten episodes, allowing Tartakovsky to wrap up the story. It's set fifty years after the rest of the series (revealing that Jack [[TheAgeless no longer ages]]), is [[CerebusSyndrome even darker than the previous seasons]], has more continuity and now features a {{Deuteragonist}} named Ashi, who goes [[HeelFaceTurn from villain]] to {{Love Interest|s}} as the story progresses.
* As [[https://antihumansite.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/i-watched-all-629-episodes-of-the-simpsons-in-a-month-heres-what-i-learned/ this essay]] analyzes, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' focused on pure comedy in its prime, to the point of {{absurdism}}. By the time Creator/AlJean became the sole showrunner, the show became more character driven, although the humor is still present to a degree. The essay's main takeaway of this shift is how more apparent Lisa's ButtMonkey status becomes.
* The final season of ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' received a complete overhaul, dumping much of the cast and the Smurfs' village and seeing the remaining characters traveling through alternate timelines.
* While ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' has changed considerably over its run, this trope has most often been invoked during the 18th - 21st seasons. Beginning with the eighteenth season, {{Call Back}}s to episodes earlier in the season became frequent (continuity to older episodes was unchanged) culminating in a two-part finale that drew on numerous episodes from that season; season 19 imitated this structure, and season 20 went all-out with a single season-long arc. The latter wound up being [[KudzuPlot a bit TOO ambitious]], so Seasons 21 and 22 dialed it back somewhat, though callbacks between episodes from the same season remain more frequent than they had been. Though fan reaction has varied from positive to negative, one specific example of this may be an increased focus on humor based on romantic relationships, which while always a part of the show never received the amount of story focus they have until the last few seasons.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpaceGhostCoastToCoast'' changed greatly when it moved to the newly created Creator/AdultSwim. The show's humor became a lot more random, there was a lot more swearing, {{Vomit Indiscretion Shot}}s started to appear, and one episode (Idlewild South) even had Zorak and Moltar smoking weed on camera. The show had already started to go in this direction with episodes like Warren and King Dead, but the transition to Adult Swim was when they committed to it.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'': Between the first and second movies, creator Stephen Hillenburg, retired as supervising director and Paul Tibbitt took over. In addition, most of the show's original writing staff left to work on other cartoons. The new writing staff had little to no experience with the charcters, characters, and as a result, the entire main cast was Flanderized to ridiculous extremes. Following Hillenburg's return (even after his death in 2018), the show delved more into WildTake humour.



* The final season of ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' received a complete overhaul, dumping much of the cast and the Smurfs' village and seeing the remaining characters traveling through alternate timelines.



* ''WesternAnimation/SpaceGhostCoastToCoast'' changed greatly when it moved to the newly created Creator/AdultSwim. The show's humor became a lot more random, there was a lot more swearing, {{Vomit Indiscretion Shot}}s started to appear, and one episode (Idlewild South) even had Zorak and Moltar smoking weed on camera. The show had already started to go in this direction with episodes like Warren and King Dead, but the transition to Adult Swim was when they committed to it.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheDreamstone'' Reconstructs this. The closing points of the series play closer to the EarlyInstallmentWeirdness of the pilot episode, downplaying the slapstick VillainProtagonist formula in favour of developing mythos and new worlds and giving the heroes more focus. Some characters, particularly Rufus and Amberley, also gained back shades of [[CharacterizationMarchesOn their initial personalities]] and the more madcap humour began to seep onto the non-Urpney characters more.
* Season 5 of ''WesternAnimation/TheGarfieldShow'' begins with ''seven'' consecutives five-part episodes aired back to back (covering 12 and a half out of the 26 episodes of the season[[note]]The show airs in a TwoShorts format, so an episode actually covers two parts of the 5-parter, or the last one of a 5-parter and the first of the one after[[/note]]), and also almost every episode during these 5-parters features a song (something that already happened only in multiparter episodes, but since they were fewer in earlier seasons it wasn't so noticeable)
* While ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''' has changed considerably over its run, this trope has most often been invoked during the 18th - 21st seasons. Beginning with the eighteenth season, {{Call Back}}s to episodes earlier in the season became frequent (continuity to older episodes was unchanged) culminating in a two-part finale that drew on numerous episodes from that season; season 19 imitated this structure, and season 20 went all-out with a single season-long arc. The latter wound up being [[KudzuPlot a bit TOO ambitious]], so Seasons 21 and 22 dialed it back somewhat, though callbacks between episodes from the same season remain more frequent than they had been.
** Though fan reaction has varied from positive to negative, one specific example of this may be an increased focus on humor based on romantic relationships, which while always a part of the show never received the amount of story focus they have until the last few seasons.
* As [[https://antihumansite.wordpress.com/2018/02/09/i-watched-all-629-episodes-of-the-simpsons-in-a-month-heres-what-i-learned/ this essay]] analyzes, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' focused on pure comedy in its prime, to the point of {{absurdism}}. By the time Creator/AlJean became the sole showrunner, the show became more character driven, although the humor is still present to a degree. The essay's main takeaway of this shift is how more apparent Lisa's ButtMonkey status becomes.
* Those who left ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' behind after its initial hay day will be surprised by how much has changed from season six onward. Who is this [[HeelFaceTurn Starlight Glimmer?]] When did Rainbow Dash become a Wonderbolt? When did the Mane Six open a school? [[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyTheMovie2017 Where did those hippogriffs come from?]] When did the Cutie Mark Crusades stop being NotAllowedToGrowUp? Granted, the change has been gradual, and it's just what happens when you have a show where characters actually grow and change over time. Non-plot related changes also exist. For example, Creator/LaurenFaust tried to make it a point to avoid "human poses" and [[FurryReminder make sure that]], despite their culture and civilization, the characters [[PartiallyCivilizedAnimal weren't]] just four-legged humans. Later seasons made without her diverge from this DependingOnTheWriter, with more "human poses" and more "characters inexplicably holding things despite [[FingerlessHands having hooves]]".
* Disney already took a lot of liberties with ''WesternAnimation/{{Doug}}'' after its ChannelHop to ABC, but the last season in particular devoted a ''lot'' of airtime to Quailman, with some episodes just being straight-up Quailman from start to finish without so much as a wraparound giving it relevance to Doug's life.


** ''WebVideo/MidnightScreenings'' itself underwent a massive change in 2019: instead of having members of Team Snob review the movie while seated in a car, the show switched to being shot in Brad's house, with several movies typically covered at once and occasionally, clips from the movie itself.

to:

** ''WebVideo/MidnightScreenings'' itself underwent a massive change in 2019: instead of having members of Team Snob review the movie while seated in a car, car immediately after seeing it, the show switched to being shot in Brad's house, with several movies typically covered at once and occasionally, clips from the movie itself.

Added DiffLines:


->'''Professor Farnsworth:''' My god...this is the greatest mystery of all time! We must fly to Rome and exhume the body of St. James!
->'''Hermes:''' Didn't we used to be a delivery company?
-->-- ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'', ''[=S6E5=]: [[Recap/FuturamaS6E5TheDuhVinciCode The Duh-Vinci Code]]''

Added DiffLines:

** Subverted with broken weapons being useable, but heavily gimped. While it appears in ''Three Houses'', it first appeared in ''Thracia 776'', the fifth game in the series.


** With the NBC daytime show, a few might include: The introduction of the "Jackpot" space during the fall of 1986; the departure (and untimely death) of longtime announcer Jack Clark and replacements (M.G. Kelly and later, Charlie O'Donnell) and -- most notably -- the departure of Pat Sajak by his successor, Rolf Bernershke. The CBS/Bob Goen era is another and in fact has several "later installment" moments of its own, including the move back to NBC, upgrades in bonus round prizes (smaller scale nighttime show-style showcases, but still more elaborate and expensive than early CBS episodes) and the reliance of several home viewer contests to entice a declining audience share.

to:

** With the NBC daytime show, a few might include: The introduction of the "Jackpot" space during the fall of 1986; the departure (and untimely death) of longtime announcer Jack Clark and replacements (M.G. Kelly and later, Charlie O'Donnell) and -- most notably -- the departure of Pat Sajak by his successor, Rolf Bernershke.Benirschke. The CBS/Bob Goen era is another and in fact has several "later installment" moments of its own, including the move back to NBC, upgrades in bonus round prizes (smaller scale nighttime show-style showcases, but still more elaborate and expensive than early CBS episodes) and the reliance of several home viewer contests to entice a declining audience share.

Added DiffLines:

* When Creator/{{Hasbro}} took over the ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' license, their figurines took a massive change from when Bandai America did them. Starting with the ''Series/PowerRangersBeastMorphers'' line, gone were the muscular male Rangers, low articulation joints and plain gray (or black) accessories as well as low end morpher designs. The ''Lightning Collection'' series continues this trend, even offering sculpted heads that resemble the actor who played the Ranger.


* Most pre-Renaissance Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon films fit under "Alternate Universe Hypothesis" or "Diegetic Hypothesis" when it comes to MusicalWorldHypothesis. The characters were actually singing most of the songs in-universe, while post-90s films instead mainly use "All in Their Head Hypothesis" or "Adaptation Hypothesis". The films were also usually not "Disney musicals" as people know today. The early princess films such as ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' and ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' had memorable however low-key songs and a low amount of large musical numbers, compared to works like ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'' or ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast''.

to:

* Most pre-Renaissance Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon films fit under "Alternate Universe Hypothesis" or "Diegetic Hypothesis" when it comes to MusicalWorldHypothesis. The characters were actually singing most of the songs in-universe, while post-90s films instead mainly use "All in Their Head Hypothesis" or "Adaptation Hypothesis". The films were also usually not "Disney musicals" as people know today. The early princess films such as ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' and ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' had memorable however but low-key songs and a low amount of large musical numbers, compared to works like ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'' or ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast''.



* Later ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' titles feature a shift from an idealistic, relatively down-to-earth rural story to a more fantasy-centric one. The series always contained MagicRealism, but over time it's increased and become more focal. The general character design has also [[ArtEvolution changed]] to go along with the shift. The colour palette is brighter and the characters are less realistically "small town" looking. Around the DS-Wii era is where the series' now-signature CastFullOfPrettyBoys started. The shift mostly correlates with the change in a producer of the series. The original creator, Wada, moved on during the DS era and the current director, Hashimoto, started with ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonGrandBazaar Grand Bazaar]]''. ''Grand Bazaar'' has more of a children's storybook aesthetic than previous games. The games have gotten LighterAndSofter since Wada left, with none of the DysfunctionJunction of games like ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoon64 64]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife AWL]]''.

to:

* Later ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' ''VideoGame/StoryOfSeasons'' titles feature a shift from an idealistic, relatively down-to-earth rural story to a more fantasy-centric one. The series always contained MagicRealism, but over time it's increased and become more focal. The general character design has also [[ArtEvolution changed]] to go along with the shift. The colour palette is brighter and the characters are less realistically "small town" looking. Around the DS-Wii era is where the series' now-signature CastFullOfPrettyBoys started. The shift mostly correlates with the change in a producer of the series. The original creator, Wada, moved on during the DS era and the current director, Hashimoto, started with ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonGrandBazaar Grand Bazaar]]''. ''Grand Bazaar'' has more of a children's storybook aesthetic than previous games. The games have gotten LighterAndSofter since Wada left, with none of the DysfunctionJunction of games like ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoon64 64]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife AWL]]''.


* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix vague theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures.

to:

* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix a vague and largely ecumenical theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.
** ''Literature/AnAcceptableTime'' is an odd example of this. It's often counted as the fifth book in the series[[note]]as it follows on plot points from ''Literature/ASwiftlyTiltingPlanet''[[/note]], which is hence renamed the Time Quintet, but it's set long after the other books and stars Polly O'Keefe, meaning that it's ''also'' considered an entry in the O'Keefe-centric SequelSeries. If one does consider it a Quartet/Quintet book, her mere inclusion fits this trope.


* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix vague theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.

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* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series, which mix vague theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.


* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. Fittingly the films are an example too - as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.

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* The final ''Literature/HarryPotter'' book, ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', is the only one that doesn't mainly take place on Hogwarts, instead having the protagonists travel around Britain for most of the plot, and is the only one to have a "hero's quest" structure instead of the previously standard school year structure. It's also the only book without any [[FictionalSport Quidditch]].
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Fittingly the films are an example too - as the seventh is the only book to be split into two films.



* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series.

to:

* ''Literature/ManyWaters'' is pretty different from the other ''Time Quartet'' books. For one, it stars Sandy and Dennys, the "normal" members of the Murray family; more to the point, though, its plot (about the two accidentally transporting themselves to [[BibleTimes just before the Biblical flood]]) is more explicitly religious (and, one could argue, comparably more normal) than the other entries in the series. series, which mix vague theism into their cosmic ScienceFantasy adventures. It's also the only one of the four set entirely on Earth.

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