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* ''Film/{{Hers}}'' is a Mongolian drama about a family, middle-aged mother and two daughters, rendered homeless when the tiny kiosk that is their business and living space, despite being only the size of a van, is hauled away for demolition. They spend the whole movie battling a series of {{Obstructive Bureaucrat}}s trying to get their humble little home back.

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* ''Film/TheFloridaProject'' combines this with a ComingOfAgeStory, about a young girl growing up in a welfare motel in Kissimmee, Florida right outside of [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Walt Disney World]] while her mother struggles to hold down a job partly due to her own awful life choices.


* In America, whilst his works preceded the British movement, John Steinbeck's works often cover similar ground.

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* In America, whilst his works preceded the British movement, John Steinbeck's Creator/JohnSteinbeck's works often cover similar ground.

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* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' featured a sketch with Creator/DanielCraig as Danny, a Northern-accented man in an over-the-top kitchen sink drama.
--->'''Daniel Craig''': You know, I thought I'd never work again after they closed the mine. And the mill. And the pit. And the quarry. And the dirt hole. And the rubbish pile. And the Blockbusters...

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** The three "main" British TV soap operas in fact cover pretty much the spectrum of British working class life, or at least the key pillars of it; ''Coronation Street'' revolves around the urban working class OopNorth, ''Series/{{Emmerdale}}'' focusses on the rural working class in the villages and farms, and ''Series/{{Eastenders}}'' focusses on the urban working class "down south" (specifically in the East End of London).

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* ''Series/OurFriendsInTheNorth'' is about four friends from Newcastle going through thirty years of varying fortunes in Britain.


* Creator/KenLoach is considered a master of this trope.

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* Creator/KenLoach is considered a master of this trope. ''Film/{{Kes}}'' merges this with ComingOfAgeStory - dealing with a Yorkshire teenager whose only solace in the world is taking care of a kestrel from a nest on a nearby farm.



* ''Kes'' merges this with ComingOfAgeStory - dealing with a Yorkshire teenager whose only solace in the world is taking care of a kestrel from a nest on a nearby farm.


* The American play and resulting film ''TheSubjectWasRoses''.

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* The American play and resulting film ''TheSubjectWasRoses''.''Theatre/TheSubjectWasRoses''.

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[[folder:Theater]]
* Shelagh Delaney's play ''A Taste of Honey'' is one of the best-known examples of the genre.
[[/folder]]


Compare to HoodFilm for a similar genre primarily associated with working-class black and latino Americans.

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Compare to HoodFilm for the HoodFilm, a similar genre primarily associated with working-class black and latino Latino Americans.


Compare to HoodFilm for a similar genre primarily associated with working-class black and latino Americans.



* In the late '80s and TheNineties, a genre known as the "'hood film" emerged in the US that had many similar tropes to the British genre, and often similar roots. The focus was on working-class black or (less commonly) Latino life in American urban ghettoes, with [[GangBangers gang violence]] and institutional racism compounding the usual problems of being poor, and HipHop music and culture often featuring heavily. Most were made by up-and-coming black filmmakers eager to see their stories told on the big screen, not unlike how the British kitchen sink drama was crafted by upwardly-mobile men of working-class backgrounds.
** The early films of Creator/SpikeLee are some of the canonical examples, with ''Film/DoTheRightThing'' often seen as the GenrePopularizer.
** The ''other'' canonical example was Creator/JohnSingleton's ''Film/BoyzNTheHood'', about a teenage boy who gets [[UsedToBeASweetKid sucked into the gang culture]] of South Central UsefulNotes/LosAngeles despite his uncle's efforts to set him on the straight and narrow, which popularized a variant that merged the kitchen-sink drama with the crime drama. Other films in this vein from around the same time include ''Film/{{Juice}}'' and ''Film/MenaceIISociety''.
** More comedic examples include ''Film/{{Friday}}'', a 'hood film done as a [[TheStoner stoner comedy]], and ''Film/DontBeAMenaceToSouthCentralWhileDrinkingYourJuiceInTheHood'', which was the [[Creator/TheWayansFamily Wayans Bros.]]' parody of the genre.


Kitchen Sink originated in and was particularly big in the 1950s and 1960s, and experienced something of a revival in the 1980s and 1990s, but the tropes and methods it inspired lingered within drama produced outside of these periods. Within British drama, it revolves primarily around the experiences of the working class in urban and industrial areas OopNorth, such as [[UsefulNotes/FootballPopMusicAndFlatCaps Manchester, Liverpool,]] Sheffield and [[UsefulNotes/NorthEastEngland Newcastle-upon-Tyne]], although urban working class in areas further south (primarily UsefulNotes/{{London}}) were also commonly represented. The primary theme of the material was the kind of struggles and issues faced by these people on a routine, everyday basis; the term 'kitchen sink' itself evolves from the stereotypical image of scenes involving two working-class women conversing over their washing, angry confrontations whilst the wife is cooking dinner for the man of the house, and the like.

As a movement, it evolved primarily due to the rise of educated working class writers, artists and actors emerging from the post-war reforms of British society, including the education system, which opened up opportunities to those previously excluded from it. Many of its primary movers themselves grew up in working class environs, and were writing as a direct reaction to prior stereotypical depictions of the working class; before this movement really took off, the depiction of the working class tended to be either forelock-tugging yokels who happily deferred to their social 'betters' or were simply [[WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons violent, uncouth thugs]]. As a consequence, Kitchen Sink Drama usually contains some kind of political agenda about it, often a leftist or socialist one, and is often motivated by political anger; not for no reason, the term 'Angry Young Men' was frequently applied the early contributors, movers and shakers involved in the movement. Most of them also experienced working class life first-hand, as opposed to being middle-and-upper class types, and were motivated by the desire to show the working class experience as it actually was.

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Kitchen Sink originated in and was particularly big in the 1950s and 1960s, and experienced something of a revival in the 1980s and 1990s, but the tropes and methods it inspired lingered within drama produced outside of these periods. Within British drama, it revolves primarily around the experiences of the working class in urban and industrial areas OopNorth, such as [[UsefulNotes/FootballPopMusicAndFlatCaps Manchester, Liverpool,]] Sheffield Sheffield, and [[UsefulNotes/NorthEastEngland Newcastle-upon-Tyne]], although urban working class in areas further south (primarily UsefulNotes/{{London}}) were also commonly represented. The primary theme of the material was the kind of struggles and issues faced by these people on a routine, everyday basis; the term 'kitchen sink' itself evolves from the stereotypical image of scenes involving two working-class women conversing over their washing, angry confrontations whilst the wife is cooking dinner for the man of the house, and the like.

As a movement, it evolved primarily due to the rise of educated working class writers, artists artists, and actors emerging from the post-war reforms of British society, including the education system, which opened up opportunities to those previously excluded from it. Many of its primary movers themselves grew up in working class environs, and were writing as a direct reaction to prior stereotypical depictions of the working class; before this movement really took off, the depiction of the working class tended to be either forelock-tugging yokels who happily deferred to their social 'betters' or were simply [[WorkingClassPeopleAreMorons violent, uncouth thugs]]. As a consequence, Kitchen Sink Drama usually contains some kind of political agenda about it, often a leftist or socialist one, and is often motivated by political anger; not for no reason, the term 'Angry Young Men' was frequently applied to the early contributors, movers movers, and shakers involved in the movement. Most of them also experienced working class life first-hand, as opposed to being middle-and-upper class types, and were motivated by the desire to show the working class experience as it actually was.



* Creator/KenLoach is considered a master of this trope

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* Creator/KenLoach is considered a master of this tropetrope.



* In the early 60's this genre overlapped with the British New Wave to which belonged such films as

to:

* In the early 60's this genre overlapped with the British New Wave Wave, to which belonged such films asas...



* In the late '80s and TheNineties, a genre known as the "'hood film" emerged in the US that had many similar tropes to the British genre, and often similar roots. The focus was on working-class black or (less commonly) Latino life in American urban ghettoes, with [[GangBangers gang violence]] and institutional racism compounding the usual problems of being poor, and HipHop music and culture often featuring heavily. Most were made by up-and-coming black filmmakers eager to see their stories told on the big screen, not unlike how the British kitchen sink drama was crafted by upwardly-mobile men of working-class backgrounds.
** The early films of Creator/SpikeLee are some of the canonical examples, with ''Film/DoTheRightThing'' often seen as the GenrePopularizer.
** The ''other'' canonical example was Creator/JohnSingleton's ''Film/BoyzNTheHood'', about a teenage boy who gets [[UsedToBeASweetKid sucked into the gang culture]] of South Central UsefulNotes/LosAngeles despite his uncle's efforts to set him on the straight and narrow, which popularized a variant that merged the kitchen-sink drama with the crime drama. Other films in this vein from around the same time include ''Film/{{Juice}}'' and ''Film/MenaceIISociety''.
** More comedic examples include ''Film/{{Friday}}'', a 'hood film done as a [[TheStoner stoner comedy]], and ''Film/DontBeAMenaceToSouthCentralWhileDrinkingYourJuiceInTheHood'', which was the [[Creator/TheWayansFamily Wayans Bros.]]' parody of the genre.



* Paul Abbott's ''Series/{{Shameless|UK}}'', which is semi-autobiographical, plays the trope for BlackComedy instead of {{Wangst}}.

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* Paul Abbott's ''Series/{{Shameless|UK}}'', ''Series/{{Shameless|UK}}'' (and its [[Series/ShamelessUS American remake]]), which is semi-autobiographical, plays the trope for BlackComedy instead of {{Wangst}}.



* ''Series/SteptoeAndSon'' was an example of this in sitcom form; it was one of the first television sitcoms to take the comedy out of upper / middle class drawing rooms and into a poor working class environment.
* Its [[TransAtlanticEquivalent American clone]], ''Series/SanfordAndSon'', tries to do much the same thing, with the added twist that the poor, working-class people are mostly black (oh, boy, class ''and'' race in one sitcom!).

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* ''Series/SteptoeAndSon'' was an example of this in sitcom form; it was one of the first television sitcoms to take the comedy out of upper / middle upper/middle class drawing rooms and into a poor working class environment.
* Its [[TransAtlanticEquivalent In TheSeventies, Creator/NormanLear made a number of sitcoms that played around with this trope, and are often seen as some of the canonical American clone]], takes on it, though the grinding poverty and misery were often toned down compared to many similar British shows.
**
''Series/SanfordAndSon'', tries to do an [[TransAtlanticEquivalent American remake]] of the aforementioned ''Steptoe and Son'', has much the same thing, plot, with the added twist that the poor, working-class people are mostly black (oh, boy, class ''and'' race in one sitcom!).sitcom!).
** ''Series/GoodTimes'' was about a working-class black family living in a poor neighborhood in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}, though the humor eventually grew more broad as the {{catchphrase}}-spouting JJ became the BreakoutCharacter.
** ''Series/AllInTheFamily'', an American remake of ''[='=]Til Death Us Do Part'' and the show that made Lear's name, had elements of this, though the focus of the humor was more on [[BourgeoisBumpkin Archie's reactionary politics]] and the embrace of such by many working-class people in TheSeventies.


[[folder:Literature]]
* There is a whole group of Swedish authors known collectively as "proletarian authors" (or "worker authors") from the early-mid 20th century that deals with this kind of material. Authors include Harry Martinsson, Eyvind Jonsson, Vilhelm Moberg and Ivar-Lo Johansson.
* From Russia, we have Maxim Gorky.
* From Norway: Oskar Braaten, Alf Prøysen, Ingeborg Refling Hagen and Kristoffer Uppdal.
* In America, whilst his works preceded the British movement, John Steinbeck's works often cover similar ground.
* From Finland, V??nna.
* One of the most influential kitchen-sink dramas was one by British playwright Creator/JohnOsborne, called 'Look Back in Anger' (1956).
[[/folder]]




[[folder:Literature]]
* There is a whole group of Swedish authors known collectively as "proletarian authors" (or "worker authors") from the early-mid 20th century that deals with this kind of material. Authors include Harry Martinsson, Eyvind Jonsson, Vilhelm Moberg and Ivar-Lo Johansson.
* From Russia, we have Maxim Gorky.
* From Norway: Oskar Braaten, Alf Prøysen, Ingeborg Refling Hagen and Kristoffer Uppdal.
* In America, whilst his works preceded the British movement, John Steinbeck's works often cover similar ground.
* From Finland, V??nna.
* One of the most influential kitchen-sink dramas was one by British playwright Creator/JohnOsborne, called 'Look Back in Anger' (1956).
[[/folder]]


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In lesser (and, it has to be said, more recent) hands, Kitchen Sink Drama can frequently be just as patronising as the earlier depictions, with the added bonus that the working class experience is rendered as depressing as hell to boot. Done poorly, it tends to be TrueArtIsAngsty turned up to eleven; the experiences of the working class are simply reduced to unremitting and unending misery, with little warmth, joy, life or humour presented; even the Angry Young Men tended to concede that working class life was not without rays of joy poking through the gloom. Particular in later variations on the theme, there can also be a sense at times that the makers don't really know what life for the working class is like, but are just making it all glum and miserable because [[FollowTheLeader that's what they've seen in other, better dramas that have came before]].

to:

In lesser (and, it has to be said, more recent) hands, Kitchen Sink Drama can frequently be just as patronising as the earlier depictions, with the added bonus that the working class experience is rendered as depressing as hell to boot. Done poorly, it tends to be TrueArtIsAngsty turned up to eleven; the experiences of the working class are simply reduced to unremitting and unending misery, with little warmth, joy, life or humour presented; even the Angry Young Men tended to concede that working class life was not without rays of joy poking through the gloom. Particular in later variations on the theme, there can also be a sense at times that the makers don't really know what life for the working class is like, but are just making it all glum and miserable because [[FollowTheLeader that's what they've seen in other, better dramas that have came before]].

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