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* ''VideoGame/BomberCrew'' is a crew management simulator of a British Lancaster bomber. Aside from only having a pilot with no co-pilot or auto-pilot, causing the plane to begin to plunge to the ground whenever he steps away from the controls, it also features the ability of crew to climb ''out on the wing'' to fix damaged engines.

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* ''VideoGame/BomberCrew'' is a crew management simulator of a British Lancaster (and in a DLC campaign, an American B-17) bomber. Aside from only having a pilot with no co-pilot or auto-pilot, causing the plane to begin to plunge to the ground whenever he steps away from the controls, it also features the ability of crew to climb ''out on the wing'' to fix damaged engines.engines - [[RealityIsUnrealistic which did indeed happen once]], in an incident that earned [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Cyril_Jackson the sergeant involved]] a Victoria Cross and a whole forest of AluminumChristmasTrees.


** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111's cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just a single shell. Moreover, none of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, RAF standard procedure was to open fire between 250 and 500 yards (200m to 400m) from their target, though the Free Polish airmen of 303 Squadron were noted for being more aggressive and got in closer (British pilots generally wanted to shoot down their German opponents, while the Polish exiles wanted to ''kill'' them all).

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** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111's cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just a single shell. Moreover, none of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, RAF standard procedure was to open fire between 250 and 500 yards (200m to 400m) from their target, though the Free Polish airmen of 303 Squadron were noted for being more aggressive and got in closer (British closer. (The legend at the time was that British pilots generally wanted to shoot down their German opponents, while the Polish exiles wanted to ''kill'' them. In reality, it was because the Poles were trained to get much closer before opening fire because the Polish air force flew much slower aircraft, but it gave them all).such a reputation for fearsomeness the legend went uncontested.)


** Helicopters can also glide; it's called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorotation autorotation]], a basic flight maneuver taught to every helicopter pilot early in his or her training. A helicopter that loses engine power does not necessarily spin out of control, break apart, and/or fall out of the sky.

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** Helicopters can also glide; it's called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorotation autorotation]], a basic flight maneuver taught to every helicopter pilot early in his or her training.pilot. A helicopter that loses engine power does not necessarily spin out of control, break apart, and/or fall out of the sky.



* Starting aircraft engines, particularly older ones, is often complicated and time-consuming. Many engines also require careful monitoring and adjustments to keep them running properly as they warm up. This is why many aviators cringe when a film or TV character hops into an aircraft, casually flips a couple of switches, and uneventfully flies away moments later.
** Many older multi-engine aircraft had a dedicated crew member called a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_engineer flight engineer]], whose primary job was to manage the engines. Some ignorant filmmakers forget about this crew member, whose presence on the flight deck was often both a practical necessity and a legal mandate.
** On almost all newer aircraft, the flight engineer has been replaced by computers, but engine starting is still generally a deliberate process, both to prevent accidental starts and to allow the pilot(s) to notice and diagnose problems in time to avert costly damage.

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* Starting aircraft engines, particularly older ones, is often complicated and time-consuming. Many engines also require careful monitoring Even in newer aircraft with computers to help manage the process, there are still a series of deliberate steps so pilots can notice and adjustments to keep them running properly as they warm up. This is why many aviators diagnose engine problems before costly damage and/or safety risks occur. Aviators often cringe when a film or TV character hops into an aircraft, casually flips a couple of switches, and uneventfully flies away moments later.
** Many older multi-engine aircraft had a dedicated crew member called a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_engineer flight engineer]], whose primary job was to manage the engines. Some ignorant filmmakers forget about this crew member, whose presence on the flight deck was often both a practical necessity and a legal mandate.
** On almost all newer aircraft, the flight engineer has been replaced by computers, but engine starting is still generally a deliberate process, both to prevent accidental starts and to allow the pilot(s) to notice and diagnose problems in time to avert costly damage.
later.


** This also includes Russian helicopters. In a number of action movies filmed during the 80s, standard NATO-issue or civilian helicopters were modeled to look like Soviet helicopters, typically to look like Mi-24 "Hind" helicopters by adding wings with hardpoints and various bits and bobs. On occasion, the lazy bastards didn't even go that far, just slapping a red star decal on an unmodified Western-made helicopter with an obviously Western or civilian paint job.

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** This also includes Russian helicopters. In a number of action movies filmed during the 80s, standard NATO-issue or civilian helicopters were modeled to look like Soviet helicopters, typically to look like Mi-24 "Hind" helicopters by adding wings with hardpoints and various bits and bobs. On occasion, the lazy bastards crew didn't even go that far, just slapping a red star decal on an unmodified Western-made helicopter with an obviously Western or civilian paint job.



* Combat between aircraft is often depicted in fiction as taking place within a spitting distance of each other. In reality, the aircraft are generally several miles apart. Even worse, most missiles wouldn't work at the insanely close range depicted by Hollywood. The short-distance missile that most U.S. fighter jets use is the Sidewinder, [[ArbitraryMinimumrange which still has a minimum range of 0.6 miles.]] That's right: Their "emergency shotgun" close-distance weapon is still only good at more than a half-mile away.[[note]] Most modern fighters have a gun, which operates when the range is too close for missiles. And even those guns tend to have a range of a kilometer or more.[[/note]]

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* Combat between modern aircraft is often depicted in fiction as taking place within a spitting distance of each other. In reality, the aircraft are generally several miles apart. Even worse, most missiles wouldn't work at the insanely close range depicted by Hollywood. The short-distance missile that most U.S. fighter jets use is the Sidewinder, [[ArbitraryMinimumrange which still has a minimum range of 0.6 miles.]] That's right: Their "emergency shotgun" close-distance weapon is still only good at more than a half-mile away.[[note]] Most modern fighters have a gun, which operates when the range is too close for missiles. And even those guns tend to have a range of a kilometer or more.[[/note]]



* In ''Anime/VividredOperation'', the F-35 Lightning [=IIs=] shown are carrier launched, meaning they are the Navy C variant. However, they also appear to have an internal gun, which only the Air Force A variant has. They are also seen trying to attack ground targets with [=AMRAAMs=] rather than Harpoon missiles or laser guided bombs. Also, the military tries attacking ground targets with F-22 Raptors, despite the fact that F-22s are not designed for a ground attack role and can only carry GPS-guided bombs.[[note]]The F-22 thing is at least more excusable for the fact that the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US Air Force]] has actually used F-22s in the ground attack role, albeit against almost totally undefended ISIS targets.[[/note]]

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* In ''Anime/VividredOperation'', the F-35 Lightning [=IIs=] shown are carrier launched, meaning they are the Navy C variant. However, they also appear to have an internal gun, which only the Air Force A variant has. They are also seen trying to attack ground targets with [=AMRAAMs=] rather than Harpoon missiles or laser guided bombs. Also, the military tries attacking ground targets with F-22 Raptors, despite the fact that F-22s are not designed for a ground attack role and can only carry GPS-guided bombs.[[note]]The F-22 thing is at least more excusable for the fact that the [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks US Air Force]] has actually used F-22s in the ground attack role, albeit against almost totally undefended ISIS targets.rarely.[[/note]]



** In ''Iron Eagle II'', one of the heroes hears planes approaching, starts screaming and yelling "...they're goddamned Soviet [=MiGs=]!" and runs out onto the tarmac -- to look at a flight of F-4 Phantom [=IIs=], one of the most distinctive American designs out there. The differences between the [=MiG-29=] and the F-4 are glaring from the side and rear ([=MiG=]-29s are twin tailed while F-4s are single tailed), but perhaps from the front they looked similar enough to justify their use (i.e. the droopy nose and twin intakes[[note]]ignore the very different shape and placement of said intakes[[/note]]). Presumably renting a few F/A-18s, which from many angles look very nearly identical to the [=MiG=]-29, was beyond their budget.

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** In ''Iron Eagle II'', one of the heroes hears planes approaching, starts screaming and yelling "...they're goddamned Soviet [=MiGs=]!" and runs out onto the tarmac -- to look at a flight of F-4 Phantom [=IIs=], one of the most distinctive American designs out there. The differences between the [=MiG-29=] and the F-4 are glaring from the side and rear ([=MiG=]-29s are twin tailed while F-4s are single tailed), but perhaps from the front they looked similar enough to justify their use (i.e. the droopy nose and twin intakes[[note]]ignore the very different shape and placement of said intakes[[/note]]). Presumably renting a few F/A-18s, which from many angles look very nearly identical to the [=MiG=]-29, was beyond their budget.



** This is in itself an odd example, as F-16s, which carry much smaller missile loads (a maximum of 6) and significantly less radar and fuel capabilities, are not primary interceptors. F-15s are what probably would have been scrambled in this case. This may be an in-universe example of the staff at the airbase altering the order to the correct one.
** Also depends on the location: during the Cold War, Air National Guard squadrons on the West and East Coasts outfitted for the intercept role received [[http://www.f-16.net/f-16_versions_article14.html intercept-optimised F-16s]], so it's not inconceivable that they would have been tasked to the intercept Florida ANG, for example, made plenty of Bear intercepts during the Cold War. But the simplest explanation is that Beringer was mistaken in what assets were available.



** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with Imperial Army markings.'' The Japanese army ''never'' flew the Mitsubishi [=A6M=], instead favoring the lighter, [[UpToEleven even more maneuverable]], and not-very-similar looking Nakajima [=Ki-43=], called the ''Hayabusa'' (Peregrine Falcon) by the Japanese and [[ReportingNames "Oscar"]] by the Allies. Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?

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** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with Imperial Army markings.'' The Japanese army ''never'' flew the Mitsubishi [=A6M=], instead favoring the lighter, [[UpToEleven even more maneuverable]], and not-very-similar looking Nakajima [=Ki-43=], called the ''Hayabusa'' (Peregrine Falcon) by the Japanese and [[ReportingNames "Oscar"]] by the Allies. Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?



*** The villain reminds his mooks to [[SinkTheLifeboats shoot the survivors]] with ammo appropriate for Chinese fighter jets. It is worth noting that the vast majority of fighter jets are armed with [[{{BFG}} cannons in the 20-30mm range]].


* Starting aircraft engines, particularly older ones, is often a complex and time-consuming process. Many engines also require careful monitoring and adjustments to keep them running properly as they warm up. This is why many aviators cringe when a film or TV character hops into an aircraft, flips a couple of switches, and uneventfully flies away moments later.
** This also explains why many older multi-engine aircraft had a dedicated crew member called a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_engineer flight engineer]], whose primary job was to manage the engines. Some ignorant filmmakers forget about this crew member, whose presence on the flight deck was often both a practical necessity and a legal mandate.

to:

* Starting aircraft engines, particularly older ones, is often a complex complicated and time-consuming process.time-consuming. Many engines also require careful monitoring and adjustments to keep them running properly as they warm up. This is why many aviators cringe when a film or TV character hops into an aircraft, casually flips a couple of switches, and uneventfully flies away moments later.
** This also explains why many Many older multi-engine aircraft had a dedicated crew member called a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_engineer flight engineer]], whose primary job was to manage the engines. Some ignorant filmmakers forget about this crew member, whose presence on the flight deck was often both a practical necessity and a legal mandate.

Added DiffLines:

** Helicopters can also glide; it's called [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autorotation autorotation]], a basic flight maneuver taught to every helicopter pilot early in his or her training. A helicopter that loses engine power does not necessarily spin out of control, break apart, and/or fall out of the sky.


Added DiffLines:

* Starting aircraft engines, particularly older ones, is often a complex and time-consuming process. Many engines also require careful monitoring and adjustments to keep them running properly as they warm up. This is why many aviators cringe when a film or TV character hops into an aircraft, flips a couple of switches, and uneventfully flies away moments later.
** This also explains why many older multi-engine aircraft had a dedicated crew member called a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flight_engineer flight engineer]], whose primary job was to manage the engines. Some ignorant filmmakers forget about this crew member, whose presence on the flight deck was often both a practical necessity and a legal mandate.
** On almost all newer aircraft, the flight engineer has been replaced by computers, but engine starting is still generally a deliberate process, both to prevent accidental starts and to allow the pilot(s) to notice and diagnose problems in time to avert costly damage.


* Done deliberately in ''Film/{{Airplane}}'' where the titular jet is accompanied by a propeller sound effect which is both incongruous and a ShoutOut to ''Zero Hour'', the B-movie it was based on. The directors did this because the studio wouldn't allow them to use a propellor-drive aircraft.

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* Done deliberately in ''Film/{{Airplane}}'' where the titular jet is accompanied by a propeller sound effect which is both incongruous and a ShoutOut to ''Zero Hour'', the B-movie it was based on. The directors did this because the studio wouldn't allow them to use a propellor-drive propeller-drive aircraft.



* ''Film/{{Midway}}'' was made with essentially no special-effects budget. One effect of this is that flying scenes are done with whatever StockFootage they could get their hands on. It's common for airplanes to change model in mid-flight; the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} example is an airplane that makes its landing approach as single-engine propellor-driven SBD Dauntless dive-bomber, but crashes onto the carrier's flight deck as a single-engine jet fighter (a [=McDonnell=] Banshee).

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* ''Film/{{Midway}}'' was made with essentially no special-effects budget. One effect of this is that flying scenes are done with whatever StockFootage they could get their hands on. It's common for airplanes to change model in mid-flight; the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} example is an airplane that makes its landing approach as single-engine propellor-driven propeller-driven SBD Dauntless dive-bomber, but crashes onto the carrier's flight deck as a single-engine jet fighter (a [=McDonnell=] Banshee).


* ''Film/{{Midway}}'' was made with essentially no special-effects budget. One effect of this is that flying scenes are done with whatever StockFootage they could get their hands on. It's common for airplanes to change model in mid-flight; the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} example is an airplane that makes its landing approach as single-engine SBD Dauntless dive-bomber, but crashes onto the carrier's flight deck as a single-engine jet fighter (a [=McDonnell=] Banshee).

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* ''Film/{{Midway}}'' was made with essentially no special-effects budget. One effect of this is that flying scenes are done with whatever StockFootage they could get their hands on. It's common for airplanes to change model in mid-flight; the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} example is an airplane that makes its landing approach as single-engine propellor-driven SBD Dauntless dive-bomber, but crashes onto the carrier's flight deck as a single-engine jet fighter (a [=McDonnell=] Banshee).


* ''ComicBook/TheLegendOfWonderWoman2016'': The framed nose glazing in B-17s is not just a simple round convex shape as depicted in the book, it's not even depicted with framing.

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* ''ComicBook/TheLegendOfWonderWoman2016'': The framed nose glazing in B-17s is not just a simple round convex shape as depicted in the book, it's not even depicted with framing.[[note]]Not all B-17s had framing on their nose windows, however. See [[http://legendsintheirowntime.com/LiTOT/B17/B17_nose.html here]]. The window mods they're talking about are the side windows with the guns; the B-17F model started somewhere in the middle of production with the 'astrodome'.[[/note]]


** P-51 escorts are glimpsed in the aerial battle scenes; they did not arrive in-theater until November 1963, six months after the film's date in May. Moreover, they have to turn back halfway through the trip, which is ridiculous because the entire reason they took over the role of bomber escort in reality was because they ''did'' have the range to escort a B-17 all the way to Germany and back.

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** P-51 escorts are glimpsed in the aerial battle scenes; they did not arrive in-theater until November 1963, 1943, six months after the film's date in May. Moreover, they have to turn back halfway through the trip, which is ridiculous because the entire reason they took over the role of bomber escort in reality was because they ''did'' have the range to escort a B-17 all the way to Germany and back.


** P-51 escorts are glimpsed in the aerial battle scenes; they did not arrive in-theater until six months after the film is set (May 1943).
*** It gets worse: Not only did Mustangs not begin escorting the bombers until November 1943, ''the entire reason they took over bomber escort in the first place was because they '''did''' have the range to escort the bombers all the way to Germany and back''. The concept of Mustang escorts having to ''turn back'' because they were out of gas is ridiculous.

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** P-51 escorts are glimpsed in the aerial battle scenes; they did not arrive in-theater until November 1963, six months after the film is set (May 1943).
*** It gets worse: Not only did Mustangs not begin escorting
film's date in May. Moreover, they have to turn back halfway through the bombers until November 1943, ''the trip, which is ridiculous because the entire reason they took over the role of bomber escort in the first place reality was because they '''did''' ''did'' have the range to escort the bombers a B-17 all the way to Germany and back''. The concept of Mustang escorts having to ''turn back'' because they were out of gas is ridiculous.back.



** At one point in the eponymous battle, a character states that "We can't outrun Zeros, we'll have to out-fly them!" The American P-40 could easily outrun the Zero, but didn't have a prayer if they tried to out-turn the Zero, one of the most amazingly maneuverable (but relatively slow) fighter aircraft of the war. Note however that U.S. Airmen were remarkably ignorant about the Zero's capabilities in 1941; accurate reports out of China were dismissed as exaggerated. About the only correct thing they did know about the Zero was its "Type 00" designation, the "Zeke" ReportingName not being issued until late 1942. And the Zero wasn't that much slower than the P-40 in level flight, only in a dive. Basically, P-40s taking off under fire, in a low-energy state (low and slow) would be torn apart by Zeroes...which is exactly what happened in real life

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** At one point in the eponymous battle, a character states that "We can't outrun Zeros, we'll have to out-fly them!" The American P-40 could easily outrun the Zero, but didn't have a prayer if they tried to out-turn the Zero, one of the most amazingly maneuverable (but relatively slow) fighter aircraft of the war. Note however that U.S. Airmen were remarkably ignorant about the Zero's capabilities in 1941; accurate reports out of China were dismissed as exaggerated. About the only correct thing they did know about the Zero was its "Type 00" designation, the "Zeke" ReportingName not being issued until late 1942. And the Zero wasn't that much slower than the P-40 in level flight, only in a dive. Basically, P-40s taking off under fire, in a low-energy state (low and slow) would be torn apart by Zeroes...which is exactly what happened in real life life.



** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with Imperial Army markings.'' The Japanese army ''never'' flew the Mitsubishi [=A6M=],instead favoring the lighter, [[UpToEleven even more maneuverable]], and not-very-similar looking Nakajima [=Ki-43=], called the ''Hayabusa'' (Peregrine Falcon) by the Japanese and [[ReportingNames "Oscar"]] by the Allies. Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?
** The B-25s for the Doolittle raid are wrong too - in several scenes they have the dorsal turrets well towards the front as in all B-25s past the G model. The Doolittle raid used the earlier B model; the B-25G was not produced until a year after the raid. Also, while the B-25 is a fairly easy aircraft to fly, the pilots/copilots were all experienced multi-engine bomber pilots with hundreds of hours in [=B-25s=] and a thorough knowledge of exactly how they flew and handled under every imaginable condition, not single-engine fighter pilots who didn't even bother with Type-Transition training. The takeoff sequence includes a dramatic scene of a B-25 dropping below view and almost crashing before lifting up. With one exception, every B-25 was lifting off before reaching the end of the flight deck (the one exception had the flaps set incorrectly), due to the aircraft carrier travelling at 25 MPH into a 40 MPH headwind; the B-25 has a stall speed of 80 MPH, meaning they only needed an additional speed of 15 MPH to take off.
** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111s cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just 1 shell! None of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, RAF standard procedure was to open fire between 250 and 500 yards (200m to 400m) from their target, though the Free Polish airmen of 303 Squadron were noted for being more aggressive and got in closer (British pilots generally wanted to shoot down their German opponents, while the Polish exiles wanted to ''kill'' them all).

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** They got actual flying Zeroes with the proper engines and everything - then painted them ''with Imperial Army markings.'' The Japanese army ''never'' flew the Mitsubishi [=A6M=],instead [=A6M=], instead favoring the lighter, [[UpToEleven even more maneuverable]], and not-very-similar looking Nakajima [=Ki-43=], called the ''Hayabusa'' (Peregrine Falcon) by the Japanese and [[ReportingNames "Oscar"]] by the Allies. Moreover, the Zeroes present in the attack on Pearl Harbor (when they're not shifting into [=D3A1=] "Val" dive-bombers between camera angles) are painted green; the real Imperial Japanese Navy painted Zeroes grey in 1941, with the green paint scheme not being used until '43. %%Which army markings are they given, American or Japanese?
** The B-25s for the Doolittle raid are wrong too - in several scenes they have the dorsal turrets well towards the front as in all B-25s past the G model. The Doolittle raid used the earlier B model; the B-25G was not produced until a year after the raid. Also, while the B-25 is a fairly easy aircraft to fly, the real pilots/copilots were all experienced multi-engine bomber pilots with hundreds of hours in [=B-25s=] and a thorough knowledge of exactly how they flew and handled under every imaginable condition, not single-engine fighter pilots who didn't even bother with Type-Transition training. The takeoff sequence includes a dramatic scene of a B-25 dropping below view and almost crashing before lifting up. With one exception, every B-25 was lifting off before reaching the end of the flight deck (the one exception had the flaps set incorrectly), due to the aircraft carrier travelling at 25 MPH into a 40 MPH headwind; the B-25 has a stall speed of 80 MPH, meaning they only needed an additional speed of 15 MPH to take off.
** The "Battle of Britain" scene is full of glaring errors. The Spitfires used are clearly Mk.V or Mk.IX Spits, the former of which did not reach frontline service until 1941, by which time large-scale air raids such as the one depicted would have ceased. The cannons are a dead giveaway, especially since the Hispano II cannon was not introduced until 1941 either. Secondly, they are all marked with "RF", designation of No. 303 Squadron, one of the most prominent ''Polish'' squadrons in the Battle, yet here, there are multiple American and British pilots! Regarding the American pilots, only seven were officially active during the Battle, anyway, and they would likely have been split between several squadrons. At one point, an He-111s He-111's cockpit ''explodes'' after being hit with just 1 shell! None a single shell. Moreover, none of the Spitfire pilots are actually wearing their oxygen masks, which contain their microphones, so any communication would be incredibly difficult. When Affleck fires his guns, he ''only'' uses the cannons despite standard practice being to correct your aim using expendable machinegun fire before spending cannon shells. The Bf-109s that attack them are clearly not the standard Bf-109 E, since the Bf-109 E had distinct flattened wingtips not seen on the plane in the film. A lot of the fighting is done at obscenely close range, when in reality, RAF standard procedure was to open fire between 250 and 500 yards (200m to 400m) from their target, though the Free Polish airmen of 303 Squadron were noted for being more aggressive and got in closer (British pilots generally wanted to shoot down their German opponents, while the Polish exiles wanted to ''kill'' them all).



** Apache helicopters have fixed, side-mounted guns (as opposed to the swiveling nose-mounted gun of a real Apache) and Sidewinder [[HollywoodTactics anti-aircraft heat seeking]] missiles (not mounted on the Apache, which would use AIM-92 Stingers or AGM-114 Hellfire anti-tank missiles).
*** Apaches ''can'' mount Sidewinders, but they never do because it makes more sense to carry four Stingers instead of two Sidewinders for the type of air-to-air engagement[[note]]i.e. self-defence against aerial threats[[/note]] the Apache would likely (if at all) encounter.

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** Apache helicopters have fixed, side-mounted guns (as opposed to the swiveling nose-mounted gun of a real Apache) and Sidewinder [[HollywoodTactics anti-aircraft heat seeking]] seeking missiles (not mounted on - while the Apache, which would use AIM-92 Stingers or AGM-114 Hellfire anti-tank missiles).
*** Apaches
Apache ''can'' mount Sidewinders, but them, they never do because do, since in any engagements where the Apache would be expected to carry air-to-air munitions for defending against other aerial targets, it makes more sense to carry four AIM-92 Stingers instead of rather than two Sidewinders for the type of air-to-air engagement[[note]]i.e. self-defence against aerial threats[[/note]] the Apache would likely (if at all) encounter. Sidewinders.



** In the follow-up strike on the "hatchlings" at Madison Square Garden, the cockpit dialogue regarding the missiles is even more inaccurate. The lead pilot states they are using the laser (designator) and "going with [=LGBs=]" (Laser-Guided Bombs, aka "Paveways") - but the weapon select display clearly shows, and says "Harpoon Armed". Then, just before launching, he says, "Use the Mavericks" - which is an entirely different air-to-surface missile. What come "off the rails" on all three Hornets, though, are indeed Harpoons.

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** In the follow-up strike on the "hatchlings" at Madison Square Garden, the cockpit dialogue regarding the missiles is even more inaccurate. The lead pilot states they are using the laser (designator) and "going with [=LGBs=]" (Laser-Guided Bombs, aka "Paveways") - but the weapon select display clearly shows, shows and says "Harpoon Armed". Then, just before launching, he says, "Use the Mavericks" - which is an entirely different air-to-surface missile. What come "off the rails" on all three Hornets, though, are indeed Harpoons.



** ''Film/DieHard2'' (i.e. [[DieHardOnAnX Die Hard on an Airport]]) [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099423/trivia?tab=gf is also plentiful of this.]]

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** ''Film/DieHard2'' (i.e. [[DieHardOnAnX Die Hard on in an Airport]]) [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099423/trivia?tab=gf is also plentiful of this.]]


* As it's prone to doing, ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' takes this UpToEleven; depending on the source, those stumpy Imperial fighters with leading edges a scale foot thick and bombers that look like the bastard offspring of a B-17 and an Abrams are ''single step to orbit spaceships'' which are just as at home fighting in the vacuum of space as they are in atmosphere. Even [[https://www.forgeworld.co.uk/en-GB/Imperial-Navy-Arvus-Lighter whatever this is]] can hit escape velocity, because air resistance is heresy.
** Most are modeled to resemble WWII propeller fighters but with jets instead of propellers, yet they supposedly can achieve speeds in excess of Mach 2. Take the Imperial Navy's air fighters. Real world aerodynamics would conspire to prevent this (though tough 40K materials in turn would conspire to prevent real life aerodynamics). Though enough brute force can make anything fly, it has rather greater trouble making anything ''turn'': you don't put the engine in the front in supersonic fighters, because it moves the center of weight fore of the center of pressure, and would make the fighter so stable in supersonic flight that no amount of control force would allow it to maneuver. Let's not even get started on the Orks, Chaos and Dark Eldar aircraft, this entry would reach monstrous proportions (well, more monstrous than it already has). The only aircraft that could maybe fly, and that's a very big maybe, are the Eldar and Tau. And that excludes [[http://www.forgeworld.co.uk/Warhammer-40000/Tau/TAU-AIRCRAFT/TAU-ORCA-DROPSHIP.html that Tau dropship that looks like gussied-up cinderblock,]] obviously.
** Also, let's hear it for the Thunderhawk, an SSTO troop transporter with a scale 16-inch spinal gun that isn't under any kind of faring and is only capable of firing ''above'' the aircraft. This along with the slender midsection presumably makes the Thunderhawk the only troop aircraft to be able to land infantry in two places at the same time. It banks in order to fire the gun at ground targets.
** It's probably worth remembering that the Imperials, Eldar and Tau have anti-gravity technology, and the last two make extensive use of it. It's probably safe to say that this technology negates the need for aerodynamic structures somehow. Although anti-gravity would only work to generate lift and not reduce drag; for that, one needs streamlining, which Games Workshop seems to think is heresy. Also, if one doesn't need wings because one is using anti-gravity, then why encumber a design with them? They would be dead weight and would negatively affect turning on at least two axes.
** Lampshaded with the Orks. Their ungainly and dangerous aircraft look like thoroughly un-aerodynamic heaps of spare parts and junk fashioned into the rough shape of a plane, have a wide variety of armaments and features ranging from merely "pointless" to "completely insane" and have other qualities such as their flight dynamics determined by things like the color of their paint schemes. These craft are not only capable of controlled, powered flight, but are capable of competing with the much more high-tech and orderly craft of the other races. This is because Orks have subconscious latent [[RealityWarper reality-warping]] psychic powers, so while they create vehicles and weapons that shouldn't work, they do anyway because the Orks ''[[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve believe]]'' they would.


* Finally, the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} offenses committed towards aviation, like everything else, comes from '''not doing the research'''. [[TwentyFourHourNewsNetworks Cable News]], with their need to report on any incident or accident as quickly as possible for the first scoop, will invariably use information gleaned from the most misinformed and unreliable sources and witnesses. This "information" is of course then exaggerated and spun to grab the audience, resulting in reports of 600 dead from a 25-passenger commuter aircraft, or cameras following a plane with a damaged landing gear, [[StuffBlowingUp in the hopes of catching a fireball barreling down the runway]]. Other examples come from doing half the research, and just shooting off aviation terms to sound technical.

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* Finally, the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} offenses common offense committed towards aviation, like everything else, comes from '''not doing the research'''. [[TwentyFourHourNewsNetworks Cable News]], with their need to report on any incident or accident as quickly as possible for the first scoop, will invariably use information gleaned from the most misinformed and unreliable sources and witnesses. This "information" is of course then exaggerated and spun to grab the audience, resulting in reports of 600 dead from a 25-passenger commuter aircraft, or cameras following a plane with a damaged landing gear, [[StuffBlowingUp in the hopes of catching a fireball barreling down the runway]]. Other examples come from doing half the research, and just shooting off aviation terms to sound technical.

Added DiffLines:

* The attack helicopters in ''VideoGame/GhostReconWildlands'' are repeatedly referred to as "Apaches" despite the in game models being near-perfect representations of the Cobra, the Apache's USMC counterpart and predecessor in the US Army.


** The licensed game for ''Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen'' also has this issue. While the Autobot Breakaway having the [=F-35=] Lightning II as a vehicle can be excused as it did have its first flight in 2006 and he is the only F-35 to appear in the game, and the Navy is [[ShownTheirWork properly]] using the [=F/A-18=] Hornet in the carrier fleet level, the helicopters in the game are handled with the same attention to detail. Specifically NEST uses the [=RAH-66=] Comanche as an attack and transport helicopter. In reality, the Comanche was canceled in 2004 and, despite it having respectable firepower, was primarily meant to serve as a target spotter for the Apache. It also is incapable of carrying any passengers, let alone the three that are packed into the [[ClownCar same helicopter in one mission]]. Also, any points for the Hornets can be taken away as the same level has [=CH-53=] Super Stallions on their littoral combat ships.

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** The licensed game for ''Film/TransformersRevengeOfTheFallen'' also has this issue. While the Autobot Breakaway having the [=F-35=] Lightning II as a vehicle can be excused as it did have its first flight in 2006 and he is the only F-35 to appear in the game, and the Navy is [[ShownTheirWork properly]] using the [=F/A-18=] Hornet in the carrier fleet level, the helicopters in the game are handled with the same attention to detail. Specifically NEST uses the [=RAH-66=] Comanche as an attack and transport helicopter. In reality, the Comanche was canceled in 2004 and, despite it having respectable firepower, was primarily meant to serve as a target spotter for the Apache. It also is incapable of carrying any passengers, let alone the three that are packed into the [[ClownCar same helicopter in one mission]]. Also, any points for the Hornets can be taken away as the same level has [=CH-53=] Super Stallions on their littoral combat ships. The Super Stallion is a Marine helicopter.

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