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(''Tarzan presses the barrels to Clayton's throat...and imitates a perfect gunshot'')\\

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(''Tarzan presses the barrels right to Clayton's throat...and imitates a perfect gunshot'')\\


* ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'': Jean told this to Wolverine when he was about to kill Wraith, the colonel from "Weapon-X" that tortured him. Wolverine did not care, so she had save Wraith herself.

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* ComicBook/UltimateMarvel
**
''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'': Jean told this to Wolverine when he was about to kill Wraith, the colonel from "Weapon-X" that tortured him. Wolverine did not care, so she had save Wraith herself.
** ''ComicBook/UltimateDaredevilAndElektra'': Elektra threatened Trey, and left. He did not scare him. Rather, she prompted him to escalate the action.


* Averted/Played with in ''ComicBook/AtomicRobo'' when [[spoiler: A now elderly Skorzeny informs him that he was the one that killed Nikola Tesla, Robos creator, during WWII, and he did it to steal the man's inventions to use against Robo, who was at the time serving in the US Army. Robo picks up a gun, aims... and then puts the gun away, informs the Nazi that he knows he's dying of cancer, and that he won't be dying like a soldier, instead dying alone, in a hospital bed, in agony]].

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* Averted/Played with in ''ComicBook/AtomicRobo'' when [[spoiler: A now elderly Skorzeny informs him that he was the one that killed Nikola Tesla, Robos Robo's creator, during WWII, and he did it to steal the man's inventions to use against Robo, who was at the time serving in the US Army. Robo picks up a gun, aims... and then puts the gun away, informs the Nazi that he knows he's dying of cancer, and that he won't be dying like a soldier, instead dying alone, in a hospital bed, in agony]].


** Early in season one Walt is faced with this choice when he has Krazy 8 chained up in a basement. Hilariously he makes a pros and cons list, balancing "Judeo-Christian values" versus "He will kill you and your family"

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** Early in season one one, in "[[Recap/BreakingBadS1E3AndTheBagsInTheRiver The Bag's in the River]]", Walt is faced with this choice when he has Krazy 8 chained up in a basement. Hilariously he makes a pros and cons list, balancing "Judeo-Christian values" versus "He will kill you and your family"



** Xander raises this concern, when Buffy is intent on killing Faith. Not only does she ignore him, after she failed and Faith wakes up from her coma, Buffy follows her onto ''Series/{{Angel}}'' for another go.

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** In "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS3E21GraduationDayPart1}} Graduation Day, Part 1]]", Xander raises this concern, when Buffy is intent on killing Faith. Not only does she ignore him, after she failed and Faith wakes up from her coma, Buffy follows her onto ''Series/{{Angel}}'' for another go.



** In S5's "The Gift" Giles decides not to expose Buffy to these moral questions with Ben/Glory, and kills Ben/Glory himself.
** In S6's "Villains," when Warren accidentally shoots and kills Tara while trying to kill Buffy, Willow [[SuperpoweredEvilSide goes insane with grief]] and fully intends to kill him. Buffy desperately tries to reason with Willow by invoking this, insisting that if she does this, she lets Warren destroy her as well; Willow is beyond caring, and the episode ends with her [[ColdBloodedTorture torturing Warren]] and finally [[FlayingAlive flaying him alive]].

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** In S5's "The Gift" "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E22TheGift}} The Gift]]" Giles decides not to expose Buffy to these moral questions with Ben/Glory, and kills Ben/Glory himself.
** In S6's "Villains," "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E20Villains}} Villains]]", when Warren accidentally shoots and kills Tara while trying to kill Buffy, Willow [[SuperpoweredEvilSide goes insane with grief]] and fully intends to kill him. Buffy desperately tries to reason with Willow by invoking this, insisting that if she does this, she lets Warren destroy her as well; Willow is beyond caring, and the episode ends with her [[ColdBloodedTorture torturing Warren]] and finally [[FlayingAlive flaying him alive]].



:: And of course, [[ImplacableMan he's right]].
* Common in ''Series/DoctorWho'', where the highly moral Doctor often must make a difficult decision between killing his enemies (technically a violation of his principles, though he's forced to do so more often than not) or showing mercy at the risk of them going on to hurt others. He often settles for giving them a fair chance to leave peacefully, even pleading with them to "just walk away." A noteworthy example in "The Doctor's Daughter", when he seems about to kill a man in vengeful anger but then puts the gun down, explaining, "I never would," despite his rage.
** The Doctor almost references this trope by name in "Genesis of the Daleks" when he hesitates in killing a large number of baby Daleks, stating that if he did so he'd "become just like them". In the new series episode "Dalek", the Doctor IS prepared to simply blow away the titular creature, but Rose pulls this trope on him.
** And yet sometimes his "mercy" is pretty severe, in "The Family of Blood" where [[spoiler: one member is put into a field, alive and conscious, as a scarecrow and another is put in the background corner of mirrors - all mirrors]]
** He does, however start to slide down that slippery slope when he attempts to [[spoiler: kill the doctor that the Gunslinger is trying to kill for making him]] in "A Town Called Mercy." Luckily, Amy is there to snap him out of it. To be honest, [[spoiler:The TL!Doctor is not a fan of the Alien!doctor who created cyborgs to go to war, killing thousands to bring about peace, though it is hypocritical to judge the Alien!doctor when The TL!Doctor practically committed genocide to end the Time War, making him [[LastOfHisKind The Last Timelord]]]].
** Completely forgotten in "A Good Man Goes to War" as the Doctor executes an entire ship full of Cyberman just for a dramatic entrance. Although, to be fair, Cybermen are humans who have had all their emotions removed, and who probably would have preferred to die rather than be converted.

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:: ** And of course, [[ImplacableMan he's right]].
* Common in ''Series/DoctorWho'', where the highly moral Doctor often must make a difficult decision between killing his enemies (technically a violation of his principles, though he's forced to do so more often than not) or showing mercy at the risk of them going on to hurt others. He often settles for giving them a fair chance to leave peacefully, even pleading with them to "just walk away." A noteworthy example in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E6TheDoctorsDaughter The Doctor's Daughter", Daughter]]", when he seems about to kill a man in vengeful anger but then puts the gun down, explaining, "I never would," despite his rage.
** The Doctor almost references this trope by name in "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks" Daleks]]" when he hesitates in killing a large number of baby Daleks, stating that if he did so he'd "become just like them". In the new series episode "Dalek", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E6Dalek Dalek]]", the Doctor IS prepared to simply blow away the titular creature, but Rose pulls this trope on him.
** And yet sometimes his "mercy" is pretty severe, in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E9TheFamilyOfBlood The Family of Blood" Blood]]" where [[spoiler: one member is put into a field, alive and conscious, as a scarecrow and another is put in the background corner of mirrors - all mirrors]]
** He does, however start to slide down that slippery slope when he attempts to [[spoiler: kill the doctor that the Gunslinger is trying to kill for making him]] in "A "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E3ATownCalledMercy A Town Called Mercy." Mercy]]". Luckily, Amy is there to snap him out of it. To be honest, [[spoiler:The TL!Doctor is not a fan of the Alien!doctor who created cyborgs to go to war, killing thousands to bring about peace, though it is hypocritical to judge the Alien!doctor when The TL!Doctor practically committed genocide to end the Time War, making him [[LastOfHisKind The Last Timelord]]]].
** Completely forgotten in "A "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E7AGoodManGoesToWar A Good Man Goes to War" War]]" as the Doctor executes an entire ship full of Cyberman just for a dramatic entrance. Although, to be fair, Cybermen are humans who have had all their emotions removed, and who probably would have preferred to die rather than be converted.


* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. When Catwoman is about to drop the villain into his own vat of acid, Batgirl calls out "If you drop him you'll be just like him!" to which Catwoman replies [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids "Oh]], [[ShutUpKirk grow up"]]--and lets go.[[note]]The bad guy survives, being saved by another hero.[[/note]]

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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. the ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' episode "[[Recap/TheAdventuresOfBatmanAndRobinBatgirlReturns Batgirl Returns]]". When Catwoman is about to drop the villain Roland Daggett into his own vat of acid, Batgirl calls out "If you drop him you'll be just like him!" to which Catwoman replies [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids "Oh]], [[ShutUpKirk grow up"]]--and lets go.[[note]]The bad guy go. Daggett survives, being saved by another hero.[[/note]]Batgirl.



* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', the episode "The Curse of the Flying Hellfish" has Burns sending assassins after Abe, trying to drown his grandson, etc... and yet, when Abe has Burns cornered...

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', the ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS7E22 Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in "The Curse of the Flying Hellfish" Hellfish"]] has Burns sending assassins after Abe, trying to drown his grandson, etc... and yet, when Abe has Burns cornered...

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* In ''Series/TheWalkingDead'' franchise, this trope has not only been belabored to death, it's been resurrected and kept in a shipping container to be brought out every other episode, even though it smells worse than a four year-old walker by now.


This trope is grounded on the basis that the act of killing is always wrong, no matter who it is directed against or how well-deserved, or even if it is done with the hope of preventing more evil in the future. This can come across as slightly disingenuous if the hero has [[WhatMeasureIsAMook slaughtered his way through dozens of faceless mooks]] just to reach the villain, only to hesitate or spare him at the end because "killing is wrong." In such a scenario, only CharacterDevelopment can make the disparity make sense. (On the other hand, it could also be argued there's a distinction between KillingInSelfDefense in a pitched fight, and calculatedly killing a prisoner in cold blood.)

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This trope is grounded on the basis that the act of killing is always wrong, no matter who it is directed against or how well-deserved, or even if it is done with the hope of preventing more evil in the future. This can come across as slightly disingenuous if the hero has [[WhatMeasureIsAMook slaughtered his way through dozens of faceless mooks]] just to reach the villain, only to hesitate or spare him at the end because "killing is wrong." In such a scenario, only CharacterDevelopment can make the disparity make sense. (On the other hand, it could also be argued there's [[SlidingScaleOfUnavoidableVersusUnforgivable a distinction distinction]] between KillingInSelfDefense in a pitched fight, and calculatedly killing a prisoner in cold blood.)


This trope is grounded on the basis that the act of killing is always wrong, no matter who it is directed against or how well-deserved, or even if it is done with the hope of preventing more evil in the future. This can come across as slightly disingenuous if the hero has [[WhatMeasureIsAMook slaughtered his way through dozens of faceless mooks]] just to reach the villain, only to hesitate or spare him at the end because "killing is wrong." In such a scenario, only CharacterDevelopment can make the disparity make sense.

to:

This trope is grounded on the basis that the act of killing is always wrong, no matter who it is directed against or how well-deserved, or even if it is done with the hope of preventing more evil in the future. This can come across as slightly disingenuous if the hero has [[WhatMeasureIsAMook slaughtered his way through dozens of faceless mooks]] just to reach the villain, only to hesitate or spare him at the end because "killing is wrong." In such a scenario, only CharacterDevelopment can make the disparity make sense. \n (On the other hand, it could also be argued there's a distinction between KillingInSelfDefense in a pitched fight, and calculatedly killing a prisoner in cold blood.)


* Deconstructed in ''[[Famfic/YuGiOhTheThousandYearDoor Yu-Gi-Oh: The Thousand Year Door, Redux]]''. As this confrontation between Andy and the Shadow Queen proves, the heroes ''really'' don't think it's true, despite her HannibalLecture:

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* Deconstructed in ''[[Famfic/YuGiOhTheThousandYearDoor ''[[Fanfic/YuGiOhTheThousandYearDoor Yu-Gi-Oh: The Thousand Year Door, Redux]]''. As this confrontation between Andy and the Shadow Queen proves, the heroes ''really'' don't think it's true, despite her HannibalLecture:

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* ''Series/HomicideHunter'''s Joe Kenda is very proud of the fact that he never fired his gun in his 20-something years as a cop, because he thinks it would have been stooping to the level of the criminals he was trying to catch:
--> "If you pull that trigger, you become like them. And I'm '''''not''''' like them."


* ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'': Jean told this to Wolverine when he was about to kill Wraith. Wolverine did not care, so she had save Wraith herself.

to:

* ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'': Jean told this to Wolverine when he was about to kill Wraith.Wraith, the colonel from "Weapon-X" that tortured him. Wolverine did not care, so she had save Wraith herself.

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'': Jean told this to Wolverine when he was about to kill Wraith. Wolverine did not care, so she had save Wraith herself.


* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. When Catwoman is about to drop the villain into his own vat of acid, Batgirl calls out "If you drop him you'll be just like him!" to which Catwoman replies [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids "Oh]], [[ShutUpKirk grow up."]] and lets go.

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* Subverted in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries''. When Catwoman is about to drop the villain into his own vat of acid, Batgirl calls out "If you drop him you'll be just like him!" to which Catwoman replies [[SillyRabbitIdealismIsForKids "Oh]], [[ShutUpKirk grow up."]] and up"]]--and lets go.[[note]]The bad guy survives, being saved by another hero.[[/note]]


* ''VideoGame/Persona5'': The Protagonist and [[TheLancer Ryuji]] initially bring this up as their reason for not HeelFaceBrainwashing the school's physically abusive PE teacher Suguru Kamoshida. If the process goes wrong, the teacher could die, which would make the heroes far worse than even a monster like Kamoshida.

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* ''VideoGame/Persona5'': The Protagonist and [[TheLancer Ryuji]] initially bring this up as their reason for not HeelFaceBrainwashing the school's physically abusive PE teacher Suguru Kamoshida. If the process goes wrong, the teacher could die, which would make the heroes far worse than even a monster like Kamoshida. And then Kamoshida [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil gleefully crosses]] the MoralEventHorizon, leaving the protagonist and Ryuji with much less qualms about dealing with him.


* Hans does this to Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' where he pleads her not to kill Weaselton's guards in self-defense. This momentarily stops Elsa in her tracks and realize what she had done. [[spoiler:However, given Hans's status as TheEvilPrince, it is clear that he only does it to get Elsa off-guard and purposely knock her unconscious with a chandelier so he can take her to the castle so as to maintain a good image in the eyes of his subjects.]]

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* Hans does this to Elsa in ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' where he pleads with her not to kill Weaselton's guards in self-defense. This momentarily stops Elsa in her tracks and makes her realize what she had has done. [[spoiler:However, given Hans's status as TheEvilPrince, it is clear that he only does it to get Elsa off-guard and purposely knock her unconscious with a chandelier so he can take her to the castle so as to maintain a good image in the eyes of his subjects.]]

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