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* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': A few foreign adaptations have changed the title into "Rapunzel", which has the unfortunate side-effect of not indicating at first glance its parodic aspect.

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* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': ''WesternAnimation/{{Tangled}}'': A few foreign adaptations have changed the title into "Rapunzel", which has the unfortunate side-effect of not indicating at first glance its parodic aspect.


Compare CowboyBebopAtHisComputer. Contrast SpotlightStealingTitle. See also MainstreamObscurity.

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Compare CowboyBebopAtHisComputer. Contrast SpotlightStealingTitle. See also MainstreamObscurity.MainstreamObscurity and TheOneWith.


* ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Dennis the Menace]]'' has been headlining ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' since 1974. And like Judge Dredd, now has a magazine in his own name.

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* ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Dennis the Menace]]'' (UK) has been headlining the British comic book ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' since 1974. And like Judge Dredd, Dennis now has a magazine in his own name.

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* The Ice Climbers are much more known for their appearances in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series than of their own single game, ''VideoGame/IceClimber''.


* Okita Souji and Oda Nobunaga initially debuted in the gag series ''Fate/GUDAGUDA Order''. However, they were also part of the fourth major event of ''FGO'', said event introduced them to a much wider audience than the original gag series, and they turned out to [[PoesLaw fit in pretty well with the established cast]]. As a result, it's very common for fans to know Okita and Nobunaga on sight, but have their only familiarity with ''GUDAGUDA'' is that it's the series Okita and Nobunaga are from.

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* Okita Souji and Oda Nobunaga initially debuted in the gag series ''Fate/GUDAGUDA Order''. However, they were also part of the fourth major event of ''FGO'', said event introduced them to a much wider audience than the original gag series, and they turned out to [[PoesLaw fit in pretty well with the established cast]]. As a result, it's very common for fans to know Okita and Nobunaga on sight, but think them to be ''FGO''-originals, or have their only familiarity with ''GUDAGUDA'' is be that it's the series Okita and Nobunaga are from.


* Everyone knows who [[TheTease Morrigan]] [[HornyDevils Aensland]] is because of the numerous crossover games she appears but not her original game, ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}''.

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* Everyone knows who [[TheTease Morrigan]] [[HornyDevils Aensland]] (and to a lesser extent, Felicia) is because of the numerous crossover games she appears but not her appears. On the other hand, ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}'' fell off the gaming radar in the 90s and never really came back on.
* Okita Souji and Oda Nobunaga initially debuted in the gag series ''Fate/GUDAGUDA Order''. However, they were also part of the fourth major event of ''FGO'', said event introduced them to a much wider audience than the
original game, ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}''.gag series, and they turned out to [[PoesLaw fit in pretty well with the established cast]]. As a result, it's very common for fans to know Okita and Nobunaga on sight, but have their only familiarity with ''GUDAGUDA'' is that it's the series Okita and Nobunaga are from.


* This happened early on with Franchise/{{Superman}}. ''Action Comics'' was at first supposed to feature a variety of characters but Superman quickly took off and interviewing newstand owners revealed that kids were asking, not for Action Comics, but for "that comic book with Superman in it." Eventually, the title shifted to some variation of "Action Comics starring Superman" or "Superman in Action Comics " (this has shifted back and forth over the decades). Of course, he has additional titles in his own name.

to:

* This happened early on with Franchise/{{Superman}}. ''Action Comics'' ''ComicBook/ActionComics'' was at first supposed to feature a variety of characters but Superman quickly took off and interviewing newstand owners revealed that kids were asking, not for Action Comics, but for "that comic book with Superman in it." Eventually, the title shifted to some variation of "Action Comics starring Superman" or "Superman in Action Comics " (this has shifted back and forth over the decades). Of course, he has additional titles in his own name.


* ''ComicBook/{{Alias}}'', whose collected editions are downright called ''Comicbook/JessicaJones: Alias''. [[Series/{{Alias}} The unrelated TV series with Jennifer Garner]] and [[Series/JessicaJones the live-action adaptation that goes for the character name]] don't help matters.

to:

* ''ComicBook/{{Alias}}'', whose collected editions are downright called ''Comicbook/JessicaJones: Alias''. [[Series/{{Alias}} The unrelated TV series with Jennifer Garner]] and [[Series/JessicaJones [[Series/JessicaJones2015 the live-action adaptation that goes for the character name]] don't help matters.

Added DiffLines:

* Everyone knows who [[TheTease Morrigan]] [[HornyDevils Aensland]] is because of the numerous crossover games she appears but not her original game, ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}''.


Sometimes, the title of a work overshadows the main character. It's hard to fault someone ([[FandomBerserkButton even though people do all the time]]) for assuming ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' stars a green-clad elf named Zelda for both this reason and the fact that the game features no elves at all.[[note]]If you want to nitpick, they have [[PointyEars pointy elf ears]] but otherwise human bodies and personalities.[[/note]] The title of a work can be heard so much that the character names become footnotes in comparison. This is IAmNotShazam.

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Sometimes, the title of a work overshadows the main character. It's hard to fault someone ([[FandomBerserkButton ([[FandomEnragingMisconception even though people do all the time]]) for assuming ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' stars a green-clad elf named Zelda for both this reason and the fact that the game features no elves at all.[[note]]If you want to nitpick, they have [[PointyEars pointy elf ears]] but otherwise human bodies and personalities.[[/note]] The title of a work can be heard so much that the character names become footnotes in comparison. This is IAmNotShazam.

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* ''Series/TheJoyOfPainting'' is still to this day more known as ''Bob Ross'' than by its actual title.





[[folder:Anime]]

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[[folder:Anime]][[folder:Anime & Manga]]



* In Japan, the rowdy alley cat Nyarome is a rather famous and iconic anime character. Somewhat forgotten, though, is his original source, ''Manga/MoretsuAtaro.''

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* In Japan, the rowdy alley cat Nyarome is a rather famous and iconic anime character. Somewhat forgotten, though, is his original source, ''Manga/MoretsuAtaro.'' ''Manga/MoretsuAtaro''.



[[folder:Art]]

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[[folder:Art]][[folder:Arts]]



* M.C. Escher's ''Relativity'' is often simply known as "Crazy Stairs," for obvious reasons.

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* M.C. Escher's ''Relativity'' is often simply known as "Crazy Stairs," Stairs", for obvious reasons.



* There's a Creator/RembrandtVanRijn's picture which is probably most properly called, 'The Company Of Captain Frans Banning Cocq And Lieutenant Willem Van Ruytenburch Preparing To March Out'. Or perhaps 'Militia Company of District II under the Command of Captain Frans Banninck Cocq'. Or even 'The Shooting Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch'. No wonder everyone knows it as 'The Night Watch'.

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* There's a Creator/RembrandtVanRijn's picture which is probably most properly called, 'The "The Company Of of Captain Frans Banning Cocq And and Lieutenant Willem Van Ruytenburch Preparing To to March Out'. Out". Or perhaps 'Militia "Militia Company of District II under the Command of Captain Frans Banninck Cocq'. Cocq". Or even 'The "The Shooting Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch'. Ruytenburch". No wonder everyone knows it as 'The "The Night Watch'.Watch".



* This happened early on with Franchise/{{Superman}}. ''Action Comics'' was at first supposed to feature a variety of characters but Superman quickly [[IncrediblyLamePun took off]] and interviewing newstand owners revealed that kids were asking, not for Action Comics, but for "that comic book with Superman in it." Eventually, the title shifted to some variation of "Action Comics starring Superman" or "Superman in Action Comics " (this has shifted back and forth over the decades). Of course, he has additional titles in his own name.

to:

* This happened early on with Franchise/{{Superman}}. ''Action Comics'' was at first supposed to feature a variety of characters but Superman quickly [[IncrediblyLamePun took off]] off and interviewing newstand owners revealed that kids were asking, not for Action Comics, but for "that comic book with Superman in it." Eventually, the title shifted to some variation of "Action Comics starring Superman" or "Superman in Action Comics " (this has shifted back and forth over the decades). Of course, he has additional titles in his own name.



* ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' is primarily known as the comic with ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' in it, and has spawned a sister comic titled as such ("Judge Dredd Magazine", that is, not "The Comic With Judge Dredd In It").

to:

* ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'' is primarily known as the comic with ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'' in it, and has spawned a sister comic titled as such ("Judge Dredd Magazine", that is, not "The Comic With with Judge Dredd In in It").



* ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} originally debuted as a bit player in Thimble Theatre, with Olive Oyl already well-established. Pretty soon after, Popeye became the main star, with Olive Oyl becoming his love interest over her original love, the [[ComicStrip/{{Blondie}} Dagwood-like]] Harold Hamgravy.
* The [[MilestoneCelebration 100th issue]] of ''Tales Of Suspense'' saw the series renamed ''ComicStrip/CaptainAmerica'', after the superhero who co-starred (alongside ComicBook/IronMan) since issue #59.

to:

* ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} originally debuted as a bit player in Thimble Theatre, ''Thimble Theatre'', with Olive Oyl already well-established. Pretty soon after, Popeye became the main star, with Olive Oyl becoming his love interest over her original love, the [[ComicStrip/{{Blondie}} Dagwood-like]] Harold Hamgravy.
* The [[MilestoneCelebration 100th issue]] of ''Tales Of of Suspense'' saw the series renamed ''ComicStrip/CaptainAmerica'', ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'', after the superhero who co-starred (alongside ComicBook/IronMan) since issue #59.



* ''Comicbook/{{Alias}}'', whose collected editions are downright called ''Comicbook/JessicaJones: Alias''. [[Series/{{Alias}} The unrelated TV series with Jennifer Garner]] and [[Series/JessicaJones the live-action adaptation that goes for the character name]] don't help matters.

to:

* ''Comicbook/{{Alias}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Alias}}'', whose collected editions are downright called ''Comicbook/JessicaJones: Alias''. [[Series/{{Alias}} The unrelated TV series with Jennifer Garner]] and [[Series/JessicaJones the live-action adaptation that goes for the character name]] don't help matters.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* Some people think ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' is actually called "Fievel" (and that's ''before'' you mention dubs which are). It doesn't help that it has a sequel called ''Fievel Goes West''.
* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': A few foreign adaptations have changed the title into "Rapunzel", which has the unfortunate side-effect of not indicating at first glance its parodic aspect.

to:

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* Some people think ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' is What's the strip about the mountain-dwelling moonshiner with the large wife and baby named Tater? ''ComicStrip/SnuffySmith'', of course. Except its actual full title for decades was ''Barney Google & Snuffy Smith''. Initially it was just ''Barney Google'', and it was about Barney, a horse racer. Once he met the Smith clan in the 30s, they became incredibly popular, Snuffy even being added to the title, until Barney was completely written out. Eventually he was dropped from the title, but not until years had passed wherein he didn't even appear. His name was usually written in tiny font above Snuffy's name.
* Charlie Brown from ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}''. ExecutiveMeddling produced the name ''Peanuts''[[note]]The reason given by the syndicate was they believed "Peanuts" was slang for "children", something Schulz had never heard before. They probably thought this because the made-up-of-kids studio audience on the ''Howdy Doody'' show (very popular at the time) was famously referred to as "The Peanut Gallery"; however, that term
actually called "Fievel" (and that's ''before'' you mention dubs which are). It doesn't help that it has a sequel called ''Fievel Goes West''.
* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': A few foreign adaptations have changed
its origins in Vaudeville[[/note]], and Charles Schulz reportedly hated it (he had named it ''ComicStrip/LilFolks'' after his first strip from 1947-1950, but there were already two strips with similar-sounding names – the now-unknown ''Little Folks'', and the very popular ''Li'l Abner''). So not only do most of the animated specials and book collections include "Charlie Brown" in the title, but the title into "Rapunzel", panels on the Sunday strips for many years said ''Peanuts featuring '''GOOD OL' CHARLIE BROWN'''''. Also applies to Snoopy.
** Well averted with the animated shorts – ''The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show'' – and all major features – ''[phrase], Charlie Brown''.
** In Italy it's known as "Linus" by most readers, mostly because of a publication of the same name.
** In France, it's known as "Snoopy".
** In Brazil there is an attempt to equal character and title by making Charlie Brown nicknamed "Minduim" (from amendoim, "Peanut").
** On a related note, most people know that famous Music/VinceGuaraldi jazz piece only as "The Charlie Brown Theme". Its actual title is "Linus and Lucy".
** The irony of that is there's a Guaraldi song ''actually called'' "Charlie Brown Theme" (listen to it [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ojk1dwbos here]]) and it has been included on a number of albums (including the first one released in 1963), but it takes a while to find on the internet due to people confusing it with "Linus and Lucy",
which has was released on the unfortunate side-effect of not indicating at same first glance album.
* Caspar Milquetoast from ''The Timid Soul''. "Milquetoast" has even entered the lexicon as a term for a weak, submissive person.
* By the 80s, the title character of ''Moon Mullins'' had become a supporting character in his own strip. Much of the action was focused on the couple who owned the boarding house he lived in, "Lord" and "Lady" Plushbottom.
* Both ''ComicStrip/BloomCounty'' and ''Outland'' were known for Opus, so the third comic strip with him became just ''Opus''. Subverted in that when Opus' character appeared in a new strip, it was ''Bloom County 2015''.
* The comic strip ''Thimble Theater'' is hardly known today, but one of
its parodic aspect.characters, ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} is quite well known, probably because he later got an animated series.
* There are many who think the comic strip ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' is called ''Dagwood'', since he's become the main character rather than Blondie.
* ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' had so many well-loved and memorable supporting characters that the title character could go weeks at a time hardly appearing, and just being a part of the action when he did, rather than the focus. Many people have referred to it as ''Albert'', ''Churchy'' or just "that political cartoon set in a swamp." Of course, Pogo's status as the swamp's OnlySaneMan often had him delivering the Aesop or solving the problem.
* ''ComicStrip/GasolineAlley'' initially was about an auto mechanic named Walt Wallet. One morning he found a baby on his doorstep, named him Skeezix for some reason, and the baby actually grew up in real time, becoming a boy, young man, grown man with a wife and kids and later a grandfather. The action began to center around Skeezix so much, with initially single Walt becoming a husband and eventual widower, all the while moving further into the background, it should be no surprise that after not much time, the comic became referred to as ''Skeezix''.
* The ancient strip ''ComicStrip/BringingUpFather'' centered on Jiggs, an Irish hod carrier who came into the United States as a millionaire thanks to winning a sweepstakes. Also prominent is Jigg's disapproving wife Maggie. The strip has been referred to as ''Jiggs'', ''Jiggs and Maggie'' or ''Maggie and Jiggs'' almost exclusively, almost never by its actual title.



[[folder:Films -- Animation]]
* Some people think ''WesternAnimation/AnAmericanTail'' is actually called "Fievel" (and that's ''before'' you mention dubs which are). It doesn't help that it has a sequel called ''Fievel Goes West''.
* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'': A few foreign adaptations have changed the title into "Rapunzel", which has the unfortunate side-effect of not indicating at first glance its parodic aspect.
[[/folder]]



* The theme tune to ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'' [[TitleDrop drops the film title in the lyrics]], but is actually titled "Nobody Does it Better".
** Not to mention that none of the Film/JamesBond films is actually ''called'' "James Bond" or "007", yet everyone calls the series that (although the codename, at least in some countries, is used in every title).
* ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' was in fact the first Franchise/{{Batman}} film not to feature the word "Batman" in the title, but (rather understandably) it was often assumed that the title of the film was ''Batman: The Dark Knight'' (which was actually used in some countries) or something to that effect. Just as frustratingly, ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'' has been called ''The Dark Knight'' by people who can't remember the full title.
** Adding to the confusion, at least among pinball fans, Creator/{{Stern}} made a pinball machine out of ''The Dark Knight'' and titled it simply as "Batman."

to:

* The theme tune to ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'' [[TitleDrop drops the film title in the lyrics]], but is actually titled "Nobody Does it Better".
''Film/JamesBond'':
** Not to mention that none None of the Film/JamesBond ''James Bond'' films is actually ''called'' "James Bond" or "007", yet everyone calls the series that (although the codename, at least in some countries, is used in every title).
** The theme tune to ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'' [[TitleDrop drops the film title in the lyrics]], but is actually titled "Nobody Does it Better".
* ''Film/TheDarkKnight'' was in fact the first Franchise/{{Batman}} film not to feature the word "Batman" in the title, but (rather understandably) it was often assumed that the title of the film was ''Batman: The Dark Knight'' (which was actually used in some countries) or something to that effect. Just as frustratingly, ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'' has been called ''The Dark Knight'' by people who can't remember the full title.
**
title. Adding to the confusion, at least among pinball fans, Creator/{{Stern}} made a pinball machine out of ''The Dark Knight'' and titled it simply as "Batman.""Batman".



--> ''[[LongTitle The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver’d by Pyrates.]]''
* ''Literature/GulliversTravels''. While his name is still in the title, it's not just "Gulliver's Travels". The full title was: "Travels Into Several Remote Nations of the World in Four Parts by Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then Captain of Several Ships."
** And many adaptations belie even the shortened title by having Gulliver visit only Lilliput. It's supposed to be ''Travels'' plural, not ''Travel''.

to:

--> ''[[LongTitle The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, of York, Mariner: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of America, near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. With An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver’d deliver'd by Pyrates.]]''
* ''Literature/GulliversTravels''. While his name is still in the title, it's not just "Gulliver's Travels". The full title was: "Travels Into into Several Remote Nations of the World in Four Parts by Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then Captain of Several Ships."
**
Ships". And many adaptations belie even the shortened title by having Gulliver visit only Lilliput. It's supposed to be ''Travels'' plural, not ''Travel''.



* Literature/DonQuixote (original title: ''The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha ("El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha"'' in the original Spanish)). OlderThanSteam.
* ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' is frequently referred to as ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'', albeit as much due to the breakout television series of the same name (one instalment of the series was in fact called Thomas The Tank Engine however, as does some of the novels' merchandise use the show's moniker).
** The television series itself has never actually been titled ''Thomas the Tank Engine''. It was originally titled ''Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends'', before being shortened to ''Thomas and Friends''.

to:

* Literature/DonQuixote (original title: ''The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha ("El Mancha'' ("''El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha"'' Mancha''" in the original Spanish)). OlderThanSteam.
* ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' is frequently referred to as ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'', albeit as much due to the breakout television series of the same name (one instalment installment of the series was in fact called Thomas The "Thomas the Tank Engine Engine" however, as does some of the novels' merchandise use the show's moniker).
**
moniker). The television series itself has never actually been titled ''Thomas the Tank Engine''. It was originally titled ''Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends'', before being shortened to ''Thomas and Friends''.



[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

to:

[[folder: Live Action TV ]][[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' is much better known as "[[BreakoutCharacter Urkel]]."

to:

* ''Series/FamilyMatters'' is much better known as "[[BreakoutCharacter Urkel]]."Urkel]]".






[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* What's the strip about the mountain-dwelling moonshiner with the large wife and baby named Tater? ''ComicStrip/SnuffySmith'', of course. Except its actual full title for decades was ''Barney Google & Snuffy Smith''. Initially it was just ''Barney Google'', and it was about Barney, a horse racer. Once he met the Smith clan in the 30s, they became incredibly popular, Snuffy even being added to the title, until Barney was completely written out. Eventually he was dropped from the title, but not until years had passed wherein he didn't even appear. His name was usually written in tiny font above Snuffy's name.
* Charlie Brown from ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}''. ExecutiveMeddling produced the name ''Peanuts''[[note]]The reason given by the syndicate was they believed "Peanuts" was slang for "children", something Schulz had never heard before. They probably thought this because the made-up-of-kids studio audience on the ''Howdy Doody'' show (very popular at the time) was famously referred to as "The Peanut Gallery"; however, that term actually has its origins in Vaudeville[[/note]], and Charles Schulz reportedly hated it (he had named it ''ComicStrip/LilFolks'' after his first strip from 1947-1950, but there were already two strips with similar-sounding names – the now-unknown ''Little Folks'', and the very popular ''Li'l Abner''). So not only do most of the animated specials and book collections include "Charlie Brown" in the title, but the title panels on the Sunday strips for many years said ''Peanuts featuring '''GOOD OL' CHARLIE BROWN'''''. Also applies to Snoopy.
** Well averted with the animated shorts – ''The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show'' – and all major features – ''[phrase], Charlie Brown''.
** In Italy it's known as "Linus" by most readers, mostly because of a publication of the same name.
** In France, it's known as "Snoopy".
** In Brazil there is an attempt to equal character and title by making Charlie Brown nicknamed "Minduim" (from amendoim, "Peanut").
** On a related note, most people know that famous Music/VinceGuaraldi jazz piece only as "The Charlie Brown Theme". Its actual title is "Linus and Lucy".
** The irony of that is there's a Guaraldi song ''actually called'' "Charlie Brown Theme" (listen to it [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ojk1dwbos here]]) and it has been included on a number of albums (including the first one released in 1963), but it takes a while to find on the internet due to people confusing it with "Linus and Lucy", which was released on the same first album.
* Caspar Milquetoast from ''The Timid Soul''. "Milquetoast" has even entered the lexicon as a term for a weak, submissive person.
* By the 80s, the title character of ''Moon Mullins'' had become a supporting character in his own strip. Much of the action was focused on the couple who owned the boarding house he lived in, "Lord" and "Lady" Plushbottom.
* Both ''ComicStrip/BloomCounty'' and ''Outland'' were known for Opus, so the third comic strip with him became just ''Opus''. Subverted in that when Opus' character appeared in a new strip, it was ''Bloom County 2015''.
* The comic strip ''Thimble Theater'' is hardly known today, but one of its characters, ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} is quite well known, probably because he later got an animated series.
* There are many who think the comic strip ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' is called ''Dagwood'', since he's become the main character rather than Blondie.
* ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' had so many well-loved and memorable supporting characters that the title character could go weeks at a time hardly appearing, and just being a part of the action when he did, rather than the focus. Many people have referred to it as ''Albert'', ''Churchy'' or just "that political cartoon set in a swamp." Of course, Pogo's status as the swamp's OnlySaneMan often had him delivering the Aesop or solving the problem.
* ''ComicStrip/GasolineAlley'' initially was about an auto mechanic named Walt Wallet. One morning he found a baby on his doorstep, named him Skeezix for some reason, and the baby actually grew up in real time, becoming a boy, young man, grown man with a wife and kids and later a grandfather. The action began to center around Skeezix so much, with initially single Walt becoming a husband and eventual widower, all the while moving further into the background, it should be no surprise that after not much time, the comic became referred to as ''Skeezix''.
* The ancient strip ''ComicStrip/BringingUpFather'' centered on Jiggs, an Irish hod carrier who came into the United States as a millionaire thanks to winning a sweepstakes. Also prominent is Jigg's disapproving wife Maggie. The strip has been referred to as ''Jiggs'', ''Jiggs and Maggie'' or ''Maggie and Jiggs'' almost exclusively, almost never by its actual title.

to:

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
[[folder:Theater]]
* What's Sadie Thompson from ''Rain''. This was due to the strip about [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode Hays Office]], which wouldn't let the mountain-dwelling moonshiner with the large wife and baby named Tater? ''ComicStrip/SnuffySmith'', of course. Except its actual full title for decades was ''Barney Google & Snuffy Smith''. Initially it was just ''Barney Google'', and it was about Barney, a horse racer. Once he met the Smith clan word "rain" be used anywhere in the 30s, they became incredibly popular, Snuffy even being added 1932 film in the hopes of [[AdaptationDisplacement downplaying the connection to the title, until Barney notoriously salacious source material]]. However, "Miss Thompson" was completely written out. Eventually he was dropped from the title, but not until years had passed wherein he didn't even appear. His name was usually written in tiny font above Snuffy's name.
* Charlie Brown from ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}''. ExecutiveMeddling produced the name ''Peanuts''[[note]]The reason given by the syndicate was they believed "Peanuts" was slang for "children", something Schulz had never heard before. They probably thought this because the made-up-of-kids studio audience on the ''Howdy Doody'' show (very popular at the time) was famously referred to as "The Peanut Gallery"; however, that term actually has its origins in Vaudeville[[/note]], and Charles Schulz reportedly hated it (he had named it ''ComicStrip/LilFolks'' after his first strip from 1947-1950, but there were already two strips with similar-sounding names – the now-unknown ''Little Folks'', and the very popular ''Li'l Abner''). So not only do most of the animated specials and book collections include "Charlie Brown" in the title, but
the title panels on the Sunday strips for many years said ''Peanuts featuring '''GOOD OL' CHARLIE BROWN'''''. Also applies to Snoopy.
** Well averted with the animated shorts – ''The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show'' – and all major features – ''[phrase], Charlie Brown''.
** In Italy it's known as "Linus" by most readers, mostly because of a publication
of the same name.
** In France, it's known as "Snoopy".
** In Brazil there is an attempt to equal character and title by making Charlie Brown nicknamed "Minduim" (from amendoim, "Peanut").
** On a related note, most people know that famous Music/VinceGuaraldi jazz piece only as "The Charlie Brown Theme". Its actual title is "Linus and Lucy".
** The irony of that is there's a Guaraldi song ''actually called'' "Charlie Brown Theme" (listen to it [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ojk1dwbos here]]) and it has been included on a number of albums (including
short story the first one released in 1963), but it takes a while to find on the internet due to people confusing it with "Linus and Lucy", which play was released on the same first album.
based on.
* Caspar Milquetoast from ''The Timid Soul''. "Milquetoast" has Does anyone even entered remember the lexicon as a term for a weak, submissive person.
* By the 80s, the title character of ''Moon Mullins'' had become a supporting character in his own strip. Much
name of the action was focused on the couple who owned the boarding house he lived in, "Lord" and "Lady" Plushbottom.
* Both ''ComicStrip/BloomCounty'' and ''Outland'' were known for Opus, so the third comic strip with him became just ''Opus''. Subverted in
play that when Opus' character appeared in a new strip, gave us [[{{Malaproper}} Mrs. Malaprop]]? No? Okay, it was ''Bloom County 2015''.
* The comic strip ''Thimble Theater'' is hardly known today, but one of its characters, ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} is quite well known, probably because he later got an animated series.
* There are many who think the comic strip ''ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'' is called ''Dagwood'', since he's become the main character rather than Blondie.
* ''ComicStrip/{{Pogo}}'' had so many well-loved and memorable supporting characters that the title character could go weeks at a time hardly appearing, and just being a part of the action when he did, rather than the focus. Many people have referred to it as ''Albert'', ''Churchy'' or just "that political cartoon set in a swamp." Of course, Pogo's status as the swamp's OnlySaneMan often had him delivering the Aesop or solving the problem.
* ''ComicStrip/GasolineAlley'' initially was about an auto mechanic named Walt Wallet. One morning he found a baby on his doorstep, named him Skeezix for some reason, and the baby actually grew up in real time, becoming a boy, young man, grown man with a wife and kids and later a grandfather. The action began to center around Skeezix so much, with initially single Walt becoming a husband and eventual widower, all the while moving further into the background, it should be no surprise that after not much time, the comic became referred to as ''Skeezix''.
* The ancient strip ''ComicStrip/BringingUpFather'' centered on Jiggs, an Irish hod carrier who came into the United States as a millionaire thanks to winning a sweepstakes. Also prominent is Jigg's disapproving wife Maggie. The strip has been referred to as ''Jiggs'', ''Jiggs and Maggie'' or ''Maggie and Jiggs'' almost exclusively, almost never by its actual title.
Joseph Brinsley Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals''.



[[folder:Theatre]]
* Sadie Thompson from ''Rain''. This was due to the [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode Hays Office]], which wouldn't let the word "rain" be used anywhere in the 1932 film in the hopes of [[AdaptationDisplacement downplaying the connection to the notoriously salacious source material]]. However, "Miss Thompson" was the title of the short story the play was based on.
* Does anyone even remember the name of the play that gave us [[{{Malaproper}} Mrs. Malaprop]]? No? Okay, it was Joseph Brinsley Sheridan's ''Theatre/TheRivals''.
[[/folder]]



* The actor Creator/SylvesterMcCoy (born Percy Kent-Smith) got his stage name this way. Some of his earlier work was as a sidekick/warm-up man to the stand-up comedian-cum-performance artist Ken Campbell, as a fictional character called "Sylveste [=McCoy=]". To further the joke, his character was credited in the playbill as "Sylveste [=McCoy=] as Sylveste [=McCoy=]". One reviewer didn't get the joke and used it in the review as if it was his real name, so he went with it and used it as his stage name from then on (though adding an "r" to the end - no, those weren't typos earlier. [=McCoy=] added the 'r' so the the name would not have 13 letters).

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* The actor Creator/SylvesterMcCoy (born Percy Kent-Smith) got his stage name this way. Some of his earlier work was as a sidekick/warm-up man to the stand-up comedian-cum-performance artist Ken Campbell, as a fictional character called "Sylveste [=McCoy=]". To further the joke, his character was credited in the playbill as "Sylveste [=McCoy=] as Sylveste [=McCoy=]". One reviewer didn't get the joke and used it in the review as if it was his real name, so he went with it and used it as his stage name from then on (though adding an "r" to the end - -- no, those weren't typos earlier. [=McCoy=] added the 'r' so the the name would not have 13 letters).





* ''Film/StarWarsANewHope'' was originally just called ''Star Wars''. Subsequent films then became ''Star Wars - [Title of Episode Goes Here]''. Until the prequels were a thing, people tended to speak of the Original Trilogy as ''Star Wars'' (not, ''A New Hope''), ''The Empire Strikes Back'' and ''Return of the Jedi''.


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[[caption-width-right:345:[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosMelee In this case, it's an]] ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBrosMelee item]]''.]]
org/pmwiki/pub/images/don_quixote.png]]



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