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* ''Black Out'' by Lisa Unger


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%% * ''Black Out'' by Lisa Unger

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[[folder:Web comics]]
* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' has [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff3000/fc02934.htm this exchange]] at Mr Kornada's trial:
-->'''Clippy:''' I still believe that Mr Kornada believes he could have handled things.
[[/folder]]

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* ''Literature/TheLostFleet'': Discussed in passing when the protagonist first participates in the interrogation of an enemy prisoner. The intelligence officer overseeing the process briefs him on the LieDetector technology they use, and explicitly warns him that it can only pick up on ''deliberate'' dishonesty: If someone has been given an incomplete or distorted account of something they learned about secondhand then it won't show up on the readouts as a lie. What would happen if it were directed at someone who's suffering from delusional psychosis ([[spoiler: Such as Captain Falco after his mental breakdown]]) or other mental illness never comes up.

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' has [[TheEmpath Counselor Troi]], when asked if someone is lying, often using variations on this line, like "I sense no deception in him" or "He certainly believes it".


* In the {{Pilot}} of ''Series/OnceUponATime'', Henry tells Emma, a LivingLieDecector, about Storybrooke's nature as a town of amnesiac fairytale characters. When Emma doesn't believe him, Henry asks her to tell if he's lying. She confirms he isn't, but then says that doesn't mean he's right.

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* In the {{Pilot}} of ''Series/OnceUponATime'', Henry tells Emma, a LivingLieDecector, LivingLieDetector, about Storybrooke's nature as a town of amnesiac fairytale characters. When Emma doesn't believe him, Henry asks her to tell if he's lying. She confirms he isn't, but then says that doesn't mean he's right.


* Medieval heretics [[CaptainObvious didn't like to be caught by the Inquisitions]] but a lot of them also didn't like to lie, since that was frequently one of those things that they found so reprehensible about mainstream religion that they would bother to be heretics with the associated risks and effort, so Inquisitors' manuals are full of warnings of their trying tricks based on this. Especially in the form:

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* Medieval heretics [[CaptainObvious didn't like to be caught by the Inquisitions]] Inquisitions but a lot of them also didn't like to lie, since that was frequently one of those things that they found so reprehensible about mainstream religion that they would bother to be heretics with the associated risks and effort, so Inquisitors' manuals are full of warnings of their trying tricks based on this. Especially in the form:


* In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', Jet tells a story that is obviously false, yet Toph's normally foolproof lie-detector ability suggests he's telling the truth. The conclusion is that Jet thinks he's telling the truth, but has actually been the victim of brainwashing.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', Jet tells a story that is obviously false, yet Toph's normally foolproof lie-detector ability suggests he's telling the truth. The Everyone comes to the conclusion is that Jet thinks he's telling the truth, but has actually been the victim of brainwashing.


In the Pilot of * ''Series/OnceUponATime'', Henry tells Emma, a LivingLieDecector, about Storybrooke's nature as a town of amnesiac fairytale characters. When Emma doesn't believe him, Henry asks her to tell if he's lying. She confirms he isn't, but then says that doesn't mean he's right.

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* In the Pilot {{Pilot}} of * ''Series/OnceUponATime'', Henry tells Emma, a LivingLieDecector, about Storybrooke's nature as a town of amnesiac fairytale characters. When Emma doesn't believe him, Henry asks her to tell if he's lying. She confirms he isn't, but then says that doesn't mean he's right.

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In the Pilot of * ''Series/OnceUponATime'', Henry tells Emma, a LivingLieDecector, about Storybrooke's nature as a town of amnesiac fairytale characters. When Emma doesn't believe him, Henry asks her to tell if he's lying. She confirms he isn't, but then says that doesn't mean he's right.


Either way, Bob's not accusing Alice of lying, but he's still not quite as understanding as Alice might hope. He's implying (in the former case) that she's over-imaginative, paranoid, even crazy, or (in the latter) that she doesn't know herself as well as he does or that she lacks follow-through. In any case, Alice usually finds it pretty insulting, even though in most cases Bob means well by it. Related to DamnedByFaintPraise, TriviallyObvious. [[IThoughtItMeant Not related to]] [[Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann believing in someone who believes in you.]]

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Either way, Bob's not accusing Alice of lying, but he's still not quite as understanding as Alice might hope. He's implying (in the former case) that she's over-imaginative, paranoid, even crazy, or (in the latter) that she doesn't know herself as well as he does or that she lacks follow-through. In any case, Alice usually finds it pretty insulting, even though in most cases Bob means well by it. Related to DamnedByFaintPraise, TriviallyObvious. [[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Not related to]] [[Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann believing in someone who believes in you.]]


* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', a successful use of the Bluff skill is used to make someone believe you're being genuine even when you're not. As ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0767.html can demonstrate]], it is ''much'' too easy to buff this skill to the point where even the most BlatantLies will stick without any trouble. Many [=GMs=] therefore declare that "convincing the NPC you're being genuine" ''doesn't'' mean "convincing the NPC to believe what you said", and the NPC will just decide you're a very strange person who honestly believes something clearly false. ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' made this fix explicit.

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* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', a successful use of the Bluff skill is used to make someone believe you're being genuine even when you're not. As ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0767.html can demonstrate]], it is ''much'' [[GameBreaker too easy easy]] to buff this skill to the point where even the most BlatantLies will stick without any trouble. Many [=GMs=] therefore declare that "convincing the NPC you're being genuine" ''doesn't'' mean "convincing the NPC to believe what you said", and the NPC will just decide you're a very strange person who honestly believes something clearly false. ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' made this fix explicit.


* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', a successful use of the Bluff skill is used to make someone believe you're being genuine even when you're not. A particularly [[KillerGameMaster sadistic DM]] (or simply a reasonable one trying to curb {{Munchkin}}ism through BotheringByTheBook) can use this trope to make people believe characters aren't lying without actually buying into their bluffs. Given how easily it is to turn the bluff skill into a GameBreaker if you do ''not'' employ this trope (as demonstrated by ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0767.html here]]), this may be justified.

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* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', a successful use of the Bluff skill is used to make someone believe you're being genuine even when you're not. A particularly [[KillerGameMaster sadistic DM]] (or simply a reasonable one trying to curb {{Munchkin}}ism through BotheringByTheBook) can use this trope to make people believe characters aren't lying without actually buying into their bluffs. Given how easily it is to turn the bluff skill into a GameBreaker if you do ''not'' employ this trope (as demonstrated by ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' As ''WebComic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0767.html here]]), can demonstrate]], it is ''much'' too easy to buff this may be justified.skill to the point where even the most BlatantLies will stick without any trouble. Many [=GMs=] therefore declare that "convincing the NPC you're being genuine" ''doesn't'' mean "convincing the NPC to believe what you said", and the NPC will just decide you're a very strange person who honestly believes something clearly false. ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' made this fix explicit.


* This is basically the entire reaction of the Tau in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'' where the Warp is concerned. Since they have a natural immunity to anything Warp-related, (including, but not limited to, HearingVoices, psychic powers, and that perennial favorite DemonicPossession), they see the Imperium happily slaughtering their own men by the thousand to prevent this kind of corruption, but simply can't imagine it happening to them (they know Chaos daemons exist, but see them as a race of psychic aliens rather than sentient emotion given form, and their FTL travel doesn't go near the Warp, but is much slower, so no HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace for them).

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* This is basically the entire reaction of the Tau in ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' where the Warp is concerned. Since they have a natural immunity to anything Warp-related, (including, but not limited to, HearingVoices, psychic powers, and that perennial favorite DemonicPossession), they see the Imperium happily slaughtering their own men by the thousand to prevent this kind of corruption, but simply can't imagine it happening to them (they know Chaos daemons exist, but see them as a race of psychic aliens rather than sentient emotion given form, and their FTL travel doesn't go near the Warp, but is much slower, so no HyperspaceIsAScaryPlace for them).



* There was one episode of ''TheSmurfs'' about a daydreaming smurf meeting an alien, and while Papa Smurf did not just believe him he said that at least he thought that it was possible. This got its reward in the end of the episode, when he also would see the alien's spaceship leaving (with the rest of the smurfs still believing the other smurf to be crazy).

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* There was one episode of ''TheSmurfs'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSmurfs'' about a daydreaming smurf meeting an alien, and while Papa Smurf did not just believe him he said that at least he thought that it was possible. This got its reward in the end of the episode, when he also would see the alien's spaceship leaving (with the rest of the smurfs still believing the other smurf to be crazy).



* A RunningGag on ''{{Freakazoid}}'' had Dexter's JerkJock older brother trying to convince their parents about the big blue-and-red fairy tormenting him (actually Dexter's eponymous SuperpoweredAlterEgo exacting some revenge). After one plea, [[StepfordSmiler Mom]] replies cheerily, "Oh, we believe that ''you'' believe it, dear, but ''you'' believe it because you're an incurable nutcase."

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* A RunningGag on ''{{Freakazoid}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'' had Dexter's JerkJock older brother trying to convince their parents about the big blue-and-red fairy tormenting him (actually Dexter's eponymous SuperpoweredAlterEgo exacting some revenge). After one plea, [[StepfordSmiler Mom]] replies cheerily, "Oh, we believe that ''you'' believe it, dear, but ''you'' believe it because you're an incurable nutcase."


* ''StarTrekNewFrontier: Treason''. Kalinda believes her dead brother is talking to her.

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* ''StarTrekNewFrontier: ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier: Treason''. Kalinda believes her dead brother is talking to her.



* Though the Stock Phrase isn't used in so many words, Wataru in ''BraveStory'' characterizes his uncle's reaction to Wataru telling him he met a wizard this way.

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* Though the Stock Phrase isn't used in so many words, Wataru in ''BraveStory'' ''Literature/BraveStory'' characterizes his uncle's reaction to Wataru telling him he met a wizard this way.


* In ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'', Dana is hooked up to one of the group's special machines while she gives her account of a supernatural experience. When she's finished, Egon reports, "She's telling the truth, or at least she thinks she is." They then clarify that they do this to weed out people who are lying in order to get attention.

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* In ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'', ''Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}}'', Dana is hooked up to one of the group's special machines while she gives her account of a supernatural experience. When she's finished, Egon reports, "She's telling the truth, or at least she thinks she is." They then clarify that they do this to weed out people who are lying in order to get attention.

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