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* In ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'', Beast lets out an anguished roar from the castle ramparts as Belle gallops away to rescue her sick father.

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''. As they are BondCreatures the direwolves howl while Bran Stark lies in a coma. The sound does not improve his mother's grief madness.


* More of a scream than a howl, ''WesternAnimation/CourageTheCowardlyDog'' does this whenever Eustace chopped down the magic tree. He goes up to the cliff and screams so loud that he ''shatters the freakin' moon to pieces''!

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* More of a scream than a howl, ''WesternAnimation/CourageTheCowardlyDog'' does this whenever Eustace chopped down the magic tree. He goes up to the cliff and screams so loud that he ''shatters ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jg34Nxb_Vjs shatters the freakin' moon to pieces''!pieces]]''!


---> '''Rose''' (''opening narration''): I will remember that sound until the day I die. It was an awful, revolting noise~not a scream, but the birth-cry of a new creature that surely had no place on God's earth. The thing mewled and whimpered in pain, and those of us who could stand in witness were transfixed~both repelled and fascinated by the grotesque spectacle of it.

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---> '''Rose''' (''opening narration''): -->'''Rose:''' ''(OpeningMonologue)'' I will remember that sound until the day I die. It was an awful, revolting noise~not a scream, but the birth-cry of a new creature that surely had no place on God's earth. The thing mewled and whimpered in pain, and those of us who could stand in witness were transfixed~both repelled and fascinated by the grotesque spectacle of it.


* In ''WesternAnimation/AlphaAndOmega'', [[spoiler:Humphrey lets out a howl when [[DisneyDeath he believes Kate has died]]]] - particularly notable since earlier in the movie, howling is done by having the character sing, whereas this one is a wordless, melody-lacking real howl.



* In ''Film/AlphaAndOmega'', [[spoiler:Humphrey lets out a howl when [[DisneyDeath he believes Kate has died]]]] - particularly notable since earlier in the movie, howling is done by having the character sing, whereas this one is a wordless, melody-lacking real howl.

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* In ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'', Lucy and Edmund's younger cousin [[TheDragAlong Eustace]] gets magically transformed into a dragon, and at first, he is excited about being "invincible", but quickly realizes that he doesn't ''want'' to be. He then realizes that [[HeelRealization he's not been as nice as he thought he was]], and is now "a monster cut off from the human race". and cries his eyes out under the moon.
--> '''Narrator:''' "A powerful dragon crying its eyes out under the moon in a deserted valley is a sight and a sound hardly to be imagined."


* Japanese folklore had it that if a traveler didn't return home, a Honshū wolf (a small and now extinct subspecies of the gray wolf) would visit his home and howl mournfully to signify his death.

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* Japanese folklore had it that if a traveler didn't return home, a Honshū wolf (a small and now extinct coyote sized Japanese subspecies of the gray wolf) wolf that was [[NobleWolf revered]] at the time before it went extinct) would visit go to his home and howl mournfully to signify his death.


* Japanese folklore had it that if a traveler didn't return home, a Honshū wolf (a now extinct small subspecies of the gray wolf) would visit his home and howl mournfully to signify his death.

to:

* Japanese folklore had it that if a traveler didn't return home, a Honshū wolf (a small and now extinct small subspecies of the gray wolf) would visit his home and howl mournfully to signify his death.

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* Japanese folklore had it that if a traveler didn't return home, a Honshū wolf (a now extinct small subspecies of the gray wolf) would visit his home and howl mournfully to signify his death.

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* ''Film/ManOfSteel'': Superman lets out an agonized scream after [[spoiler: killing Zod.]]


* The [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish]] tradition of [[DeathWail keening]] (singing a lament combined with wailing) over the body during the funeral procession and at the burial site is strikingly similar to the death wail of the [[OurBansheesAreLouder Banshee]];
"Keen" comes from the Gaelic verb "caoin", meaning "to [[Tears cry/weep]], to mourn" and its active article "caoineadh" ("weeping", "crying", "wailing") can also be translated as "[[Elegy elegy]]" or "lament". The caoineadh itself was often composed and performed in an improvised way, with at least one keening woman (bean chaointe) hired to lead the rest of the mourners, who generally joined with the chorus. The caoineadh generally consisted of [[StockCharacter stock poetic]] elements (the genealogy of the deceased, praise for the deceased, emphasis on the sorrow of those left behind etc.) set to vocal lament.

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* The [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish]] tradition of [[DeathWail keening]] (singing a lament combined with wailing) over the body during the funeral procession and at the burial site is strikingly similar to the death wail of the [[OurBansheesAreLouder Banshee]];
"Keen"
Banshee]]
**"Keen"
comes from the Gaelic verb "caoin", meaning "to [[Tears cry/weep]], cry/weep, to mourn" and its active article "caoineadh" ("weeping", "crying", "wailing") can also be translated as "[[Elegy elegy]]" or "lament"."elegy/lament". The caoineadh itself was often composed and performed in an improvised way, with at least one keening woman (bean chaointe) hired to lead the rest of the mourners, who generally joined with the chorus. The caoineadh generally consisted of [[StockCharacter stock poetic]] elements (the genealogy of the deceased, praise for the deceased, emphasis on the sorrow of those left behind etc.) set to vocal lament.

Added DiffLines:

* The [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish]] tradition of [[DeathWail keening]] (singing a lament combined with wailing) over the body during the funeral procession and at the burial site is strikingly similar to the death wail of the [[OurBansheesAreLouder Banshee]];
"Keen" comes from the Gaelic verb "caoin", meaning "to [[Tears cry/weep]], to mourn" and its active article "caoineadh" ("weeping", "crying", "wailing") can also be translated as "[[Elegy elegy]]" or "lament". The caoineadh itself was often composed and performed in an improvised way, with at least one keening woman (bean chaointe) hired to lead the rest of the mourners, who generally joined with the chorus. The caoineadh generally consisted of [[StockCharacter stock poetic]] elements (the genealogy of the deceased, praise for the deceased, emphasis on the sorrow of those left behind etc.) set to vocal lament.


* In [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish folklore]], the banshee (or [[OurBansheesAreLouder bean-sidhe]]) is a [[TheFairFolk fairy-woman]] and often guardian spirit of the old Gaelic families who can [[PortentOfDoom foretell death]] in "her" family; she [[HowlOfSorrow wails]] and [[OneWomanWail cries]] through the night to warn the family that one of them will soon die; if the family hears her crying three nights in a row, they know that they should begin planning a funeral. As she can foretell death in the family that she protects, the banshee is also grieving for the family as well as warning them of impending death.

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* In [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish folklore]], the banshee (or [[OurBansheesAreLouder bean-sidhe]]) is a [[TheFairFolk fairy-woman]] and often guardian spirit of the old Gaelic families who can [[PortentOfDoom foretell death]] in "her" family; she [[HowlOfSorrow [[DeathWail wails]] and [[OneWomanWail cries]] through the night to warn the family that one of them will soon die; if the family hears her crying three nights in a row, they know that they should begin planning a funeral. As she can foretell death in the family that she protects, the banshee is also grieving for the family as well as warning them of impending death.


[[folder:Folklore]]
* In [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish folklore]], the banshee (or [[OurBansheesAreLouder bean-sidhe]]) is a [[TheFairFolk fairy-woman]] and often guardian spirit of the old Gaelic families who can [[PortentOfDoom foretell death]] in "her" family; she [[HowlOfSorrow wails]] and [[OneWomanWail cries]] through the night to warn the family that one of them will soon die; if the family hears her crying three nights in a row, they know that they should begin planning a funeral. As she can foretell death in the family that she protects, the banshee is also grieving for the family as well as warning them of impending death.
* Much of Latin America believes in the legend of [[LaLlorona La Llorona]], the spirit of a woman who died after she drowned her children and cannot enter Heaven until she has found them; she is heard crying "¡Ay, mis hijos!" ("Oh, my children!") as she searches for them. Those who hear her crying supposedly are doomed to die soon.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Mythology and Religion]]
* In [[Myth/CelticMythology Irish and Scottish folklore]], the banshee (or [[OurBansheesAreLouder bean-sidhe]]) is a [[TheFairFolk fairy-woman]] and often guardian spirit of the old Gaelic families who can [[PortentOfDoom foretell death]] in "her" family; she [[HowlOfSorrow wails]] and [[OneWomanWail cries]] through the night to warn the family that one of them will soon die; if the family hears her crying three nights in a row, they know that they should begin planning a funeral. As she can foretell death in the family that she protects, the banshee is also grieving for the family as well as warning them of impending death.
* Much of Latin America believes in the legend of [[LaLlorona La Llorona]], the spirit of a woman who died after she drowned her children and cannot enter Heaven until she has found them; she is heard crying "¡Ay, mis hijos!" ("Oh, my children!") as she searches for them. Those who hear her crying supposedly are doomed to die soon.
[[/folder]]

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