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* In an episode of ''Series/FXTheSeries'', the VillainOfTheWeek puts a gun to Rollie's head, prompting this exchange in MissionControl:
-->'''Cop:''' You did swap out this gun's ammo for blanks, didn't you?\\
'''Tech:''' Yes, but at this distance it could still kill him.


* In ''Film/DogSoldiers'', the heroes' SAS team is in the werewolf-plagued woods because they are in a field exercise and all of their long guns are showcased to be loaded with blanks because they are fit with blank-firing adaptations (spacialized muzzle brakes to help disperse the flash and redirect gas to help with cycling). The moment they figure out that they are in a real threat situation [[spoiler:by finding another SAS team that has been totally slaughtered]], they ditch the blank guns and scavenge proper equipment.

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* In ''Film/DogSoldiers'', the heroes' SAS team is in the werewolf-plagued woods because they are in a field exercise and all of their long guns are showcased to be loaded with blanks because they are fit with blank-firing adaptations (spacialized (specialized muzzle brakes to help disperse the flash and redirect gas to help with cycling). The moment they figure out that they are in a real threat situation [[spoiler:by finding another SAS team that has been totally slaughtered]], they ditch the blank guns and scavenge proper equipment.

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[[folder:Web Comics]]
* In the "Glamour Assault" arc of ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' Elf shoots two cops in the face with [[https://www.schlockmercenary.com/2006-05-05 stage blanks]], with a footnote that she fired from far enough back to avoid causing permanent harm.
[[/folder]]


Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but take a guess [[StuffBlowingUp which part of the process is still included]]. At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.

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Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. Blank.

In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, not-so-harmless, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but take a guess [[StuffBlowingUp which part of the process is still included]]. At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.

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* Double subverted in ''Film/AnimalHouse''. Flounder is forced to bring [[TheRival Neidemrmyer's]] beloved colt into the dean's office and shoot it as part of a hazing ritual. Once he's out of earshot, D-Day reassures Bluto that the gun is full of blanks and the horse is in no danger. Flounder can't bring himself to do it and simply fires the blank at the ceiling... which scares the horse so much that he [[EpicFail has a heart attack and dies anyway]].


A SubTrope of GunsDoNotWorkThatWay. See also ArtisticLicenseGunSafety and JustForFun/TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs.

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A SubTrope of GunsDoNotWorkThatWay. See also ArtisticLicenseGunSafety ArtisticLicenseGunSafety, RecklessGunUsage and JustForFun/TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs.


Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but take a guess which part of the process they still include. At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.

In fiction, however, blanks are completely harmless, producing nothing more than a loud noise and flash of light. Also commonly seen will be characters using unmodified weapons with blanks. Manually-operated firearms, like revolvers and bolt-action rifles, can be used without modification, but automatic and semi-automatic guns must be extensively modified in order to cycle blanks properly, and cannot be used with live ammo afterwards.

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Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but take a guess [[StuffBlowingUp which part of the process they is still include.included]]. At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.

In fiction, however, blanks are completely harmless, producing nothing more than a loud noise and flash of light. Also commonly seen will be characters using unmodified weapons with blanks. Manually-operated firearms, like revolvers and bolt-action rifles, can be used without modification, but automatic and semi-automatic guns must be extensively modified in order to cycle blanks properly, such as partially blocking off the barrel, and cannot be used with live ammo afterwards.


* In ''Film/DogSoldiers'', the heroes' SAS team is in the werewolf-plagued woods because they are in a field exercise and all of their long guns are showcased to be loaded with blanks because they are fit with blank-firing adaptations (spacialized muzzle brakes to help disperse the flash). The moment they figure out that they are in a real threat situation [[spoiler:by finding another SAS team that has been totally slaughtered]], they ditch the blank guns and scavenge proper equipment.

to:

* In ''Film/DogSoldiers'', the heroes' SAS team is in the werewolf-plagued woods because they are in a field exercise and all of their long guns are showcased to be loaded with blanks because they are fit with blank-firing adaptations (spacialized muzzle brakes to help disperse the flash).flash and redirect gas to help with cycling). The moment they figure out that they are in a real threat situation [[spoiler:by finding another SAS team that has been totally slaughtered]], they ditch the blank guns and scavenge proper equipment.

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/DogSoldiers'', the heroes' SAS team is in the werewolf-plagued woods because they are in a field exercise and all of their long guns are showcased to be loaded with blanks because they are fit with blank-firing adaptations (spacialized muzzle brakes to help disperse the flash). The moment they figure out that they are in a real threat situation [[spoiler:by finding another SAS team that has been totally slaughtered]], they ditch the blank guns and scavenge proper equipment.


Shows up almost all the time in fiction, making this an OmnipresentTrope. As such, please only list [[AvertedTrope aversions]] and [[InvertedTrope inversions.]]

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Shows up almost all the time in fiction, making this an OmnipresentTrope. As such, please only list no need for examples played straight; just [[AvertedTrope aversions]] and [[InvertedTrope inversions.]]



!!Examples


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\n!!Examples\n \n\n[[AC:Film]]!!Examples:

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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]




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[[AC:Real Life]]
* This is how Brandon Lee was killed while filming ''Film/TheCrow''. A prop tech not certified as an armorer had to come up with inert "dummy" rounds on short notice and simply removed the gunpowder (but not the primers) from six cartridges and reseated the bullets. The primer from one went off and propelled the bullet slightly down the barrel, creating what's known as a "squib load." The weapon was also not inspected between takes, and when a later scene (the scene where Funboy shot Eric Draven) required a blank to be fired, the blank propelled the bullet the rest of the way down the barrel with near the force of a live round, which struck and killed Brandon.
* This was how the model and actor Jon-Erik Hexum accidentally killed himself while messing around with a prop gun on a TV show set - he fired a blank into the side of his head at point-blank range and the blast from the explosion fractured his skull and drove a piece of it into his brain.

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\n[[AC:Real [[/folder]]

[[folder:Real
Life]]
* This is how Brandon Lee was killed while filming ''Film/TheCrow''. A prop tech not certified as an armorer had to come up with inert "dummy" rounds on short notice and simply removed the gunpowder (but not the primers) from six cartridges and reseated the bullets. The primer from one went off and propelled the bullet slightly down the barrel, creating what's known as a "squib load." load". The weapon was also not inspected between takes, and when a later scene (the scene where Funboy shot Eric Draven) required a blank to be fired, the blank propelled the bullet the rest of the way down the barrel with near the force of a live round, which struck and killed Brandon.
* This was how the model and actor Jon-Erik Hexum accidentally killed himself while messing around with a prop gun on a TV show set - -- he fired a blank into the side of his head at point-blank range and the blast from the explosion fractured his skull and drove a piece of it into his brain.brain.
[[/folder]]
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* This is how Brandon Lee was killed while filming Film/TheCrow. A prop tech not certified as an armorer had to come up with inert "dummy" rounds on short notice and simply removed the gunpowder (but not the primers) from six cartridges and reseated the bullets. The primer from one went off and propelled the bullet slightly down the barrel, creating what's known as a "squib load." The weapon was also not inspected between takes, and when a later scene (the scene where Funboy shot Eric Draven) required a blank to be fired, the blank propelled the bullet the rest of the way down the barrel with near the force of a live round, which struck and killed Brandon.

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* This is how Brandon Lee was killed while filming Film/TheCrow.''Film/TheCrow''. A prop tech not certified as an armorer had to come up with inert "dummy" rounds on short notice and simply removed the gunpowder (but not the primers) from six cartridges and reseated the bullets. The primer from one went off and propelled the bullet slightly down the barrel, creating what's known as a "squib load." The weapon was also not inspected between takes, and when a later scene (the scene where Funboy shot Eric Draven) required a blank to be fired, the blank propelled the bullet the rest of the way down the barrel with near the force of a live round, which struck and killed Brandon.


Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but guess which part of the process they still include? At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.

to:

Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but take a guess which part of the process they still include? include. At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper/plastic wadding into the flesh.



A SubTrope of GunsDoNotWorkThatWay. See also ArtisticLicenseGunSafety.

to:

A SubTrope of GunsDoNotWorkThatWay. See also ArtisticLicenseGunSafety.
ArtisticLicenseGunSafety and JustForFun/TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs.


Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. The high pressure gasses used can fracture bones, and parts of brass casings and paper wadding can be driven into flesh.

to:

Guns are dangerous. It's kind of their thing. Sometimes, though, our heroes need a way to make it look like they're shooting someone when they aren't. Enter the Hollywood Blank. In RealLife, blanks are extremely dangerous, and mishandling them can (and has) resulted in the deaths of actors. The high pressure gasses used A bullet is propelled by igniting pressurized gunpowder, creating a small, controlled explosive that forces it out through the barrel. Blank cartridges don't contain a bullet, but guess which part of the process they still include? At close range, the high-pressure and extremely hot gases generated from this explosion can fracture bones, severely burn soft tissue, and drive parts of brass casings and paper paper/plastic wadding can be driven into the flesh.

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