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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
** Played straight in general throughout the series. In many, many cases, it's almost as if {{Quest Giver}}s are simply waiting around for the PlayerCharacter to come along. Granted, this can be considered Justified by the fact that the player character is always [[TheChosenOne the Hero of the Age, foretold by prophecy]] and [[ScrewDestiny "blessed" with the ability to rule their own fate]] (also the justification for the players involvement), so effectively superhuman.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' includes a prominent specific example in its main quest. The BigBad, a {{Plaguemaster}} PhysicalGod, has returned and, in desperation, the [[DeityOfHumanOrigin Tribunal]] have trapped him within his volcano stronghold using a magic [[TheGreatWall Great Wall]]. While the divine powers of the Tribunal are waning (due to being cut off from their source of divine power which lies within the volcano), the [[CorruptChurch Tribunal Temple]] which worships them had strong ChurchMilitant and ChurchPolice forces, as well as support from the [[ProudWarriorRace Proud Warrior Great House]] of the Dunmer people. At no point are these forces used offensively to attack the BigBad or his forces. Later, dialogue with one of the Tribunal dieties implies (and out-of-game developer written texts strongly support) that he truly believes that YouCantFightFate, and knew that the [[PlayerCharacter Nerevarine]] would eventually come along to save the day.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]''[='s=] CivilWar plotline has this in spades. The two sides are effeectively deadlocked: the secessionist Stormcloak rebels in eastern Skyrim while the Imperial loyalists and their Imperial Legion forces hold western Skyrim. Other than some skirmishes in the countryside, the two sides are completely deadlocked. Only the involvement of the [[PlayerCharacter Dragonborn]] can break the stalemate. By joining one side, the Dragonborn will be instrumental in leading the attacks for that side on opposition forts and cities. Even if you do not choose a side, you'll still impact the situation during the main quest when you must call for a summit and a ceasefire to deal with the dragon crisis. It can make you wonder what would have happened if the Dragonborn never came along.

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* ''LightNovel/TheRisingOfTheShieldHero'' has a lot of this among the general populace, since they expect the summoned heroes to save them from the waves and solve their problems. Unfortunately, three of the four heroes are [[SociopathicHero utter sociopaths]] who treat the world like an RPG game, and their carelessness [[DestructiveSavior tends to cause more trouble than good]], with the titular protagonist forced to pick up the slack and clean up the messes they made. This comes to a head when the [[CorruptChurch Church of the Three Heroes]] gets fed up with their constant failures and decides to kill them off and summon new heroes to replace them.

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*Music/{{Megadeth}}'s 2001 album is titled ''The World Needs A Hero''.


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[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
*Wrestling/EddieKingston was still a ''[[{{Heel}} rudo]]'' when Die Bruderschaft des Kreuzes formed at the end of the 2009 Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}} SeasonFinale ''Three-Fisted Tales'' on November 22, 2009. However, when they were all standing shoulder to shoulder and Ares instructed Carpenter Ant (Pinkie Sanchez) to unmask, someone in the crowd chanted "We want Kingston!," as if he was the only one who could solve this problem.
*Wrestling/RickMartel used the Trope Namer as his entrance music in the Wrestling/AmericanWrestlingAssociation.
[[/folder]]


* This trope describes the economic concept of "Moral Hazard", which is the idea that a party insulated from risk will behave differently than they would if fully exposed to the risk. The ur example used in class is the seatbelt law; studies have shown that people who wear seatbelts tend to drive faster than those who don't, the idea being that because the seatbelts make them safer, they take more risks.

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* This trope describes the economic concept of "Moral Hazard", which is the idea that a party insulated from risk will behave differently than they would if fully exposed to the risk. The ur example UrExample used in class is the seatbelt law; studies have shown that people who wear seatbelts tend to drive faster than those who don't, the idea being that because the seatbelts make them safer, they take more risks.


* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', [[Recap/BatmanTheAnimatedSeriesE22JokersFavor "Joker's Favor"]]: Charlie Collins is just a {{muggle}} [[TheEveryman everyman]] that yelled at a bad driver only to realize too late that [[MuggingTheMonster it was the Joker]] and spends the next two years on the run from him. Even though Charlie eventually gets Batman's attention to help him, in the end, it's Charlie himself who faces down his tormentor, and does such a good job of it that by the end of it, ''the Joker'' is yelling for Batman to come help ''him''.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', [[Recap/BatmanTheAnimatedSeriesE22JokersFavor "Joker's Favor"]]: Charlie Collins is just a {{muggle}} [[TheEveryman everyman]] that yelled at a bad driver only to realize too late that [[MuggingTheMonster it was the Joker]] and spends spent the next two years on the run from him. Even though Charlie eventually gets Batman's attention to help him, in the end, it's Charlie himself who faces down his tormentor, and does such a good job of it that by the end of it, ''the Joker'' is yelling for Batman to come help ''him''.


* Utilized in a very dark way in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday''. After seemingly coming back from the dead, one of Superman's first acts is to save a little old lady's cat from being stuck in a tree. However, he then gives an uncharacteristically [[ReasonYouSuckSpeech cold lecture]] to the old woman that there were larger crimes going on and that he cannot always be there for the little things that he thinks people should take care of. At the same time, he sees Metropolis as ''his'' city and even mention his actions are for their own good. [[spoiler: It turns out this Superman is actually a [[CloningBlues modified clone]] created by Lex Luthor as part of an experiment to create an army of Supermen to serve him. However, said clone is still Superman at the core and he proceeds to stop Luthor's plan and he ultimately must be stopped by the real Superman (alive, but weakened) with help from Lois and Jimmy.]]

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* Utilized in a very dark way in ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday''. After seemingly coming back from the dead, one of Superman's first acts is to save a little old lady's cat from being stuck in a tree. However, he then gives an uncharacteristically [[ReasonYouSuckSpeech cold lecture]] to the old woman that there were larger crimes going on and that he cannot always be there for the little things that he thinks people should take care of. At the same time, he sees Metropolis as ''his'' city and even mention mentions his actions are for their own good. [[spoiler: It turns out this Superman is actually a [[CloningBlues modified clone]] created by Lex Luthor as part of an experiment to create an army of Supermen to serve him. However, said clone is still Superman at the core and he proceeds to stop Luthor's plan and he ultimately must be stopped by the real Superman (alive, but weakened) with help from Lois and Jimmy.]]


* In ''Film/{{Hancock}}'', step one of the plan to give homeless but super-powered VigilanteMan Hancock a more credible image is to allow himself to go to jail on charges of destruction of public property. Step two is to watch as the crime rate sky-rockets.

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* In ''Film/{{Hancock}}'', step one of the plan to give homeless but super-powered this trope is exploited by Ray, a PR man, for VigilanteMan Hancock as part of a more credible image is plan to allow improve his reputation. The first step was to have Hancock turn himself in for his vigilante actions and reckless destruction. The purpose was twofold; it first gave showed that he was willing to go own up to jail on charges of destruction of public property. Step two is to watch as his actions and show the city he was not above the law. The second purpose was to show how things would be like if he wasn't around. According to Ray, he believes the city takes Hancock for granted and it turns out he's correct given how without a super-powered CowboyCop like Hancock around, crime rate sky-rockets.skyrockets and eventually the chief of police calls, thus beginning Hancock's wrk with them [[JustifiedTrope Justified by Hancock being a powerful deterrent by his powers and him not afraid to put cheap shots.]] Hell, when the criminals he put in prison try to harass him during his time there, he threatens two that if they don't back off, he will put one's head in the other's ass... [[NotHyperbole and proceeds to do just that when they continue to]][[BullyingADragon taunt him.]]

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** This is also heavily deconstructed by All For One in Tomura Shigaraki's backstory to make him his disciple and potential successor. Heroes inspire and give people hope, but this causes people to become apathetic to the suffering of others. After all, with heroes out there to save lives, why should they bother to help anyone? It isn't their place to do so. Unfortunately, Tomura bought this and it spurred him on the path of villainy.


Perhaps you [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant were looking for]] the trope called BigDamnHeroes. (Wherein the premise is played straight and the {{Hero}} ''is'' in fact the only person who can save the day.) When the townsfolk are actively delaying the bad guys or doing other things to hinder them till the hero can get there, it is HoldTheLine. Also not to be confused with SheWillComeForMe, as the person in ''that'' trope usually does need the help.

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Perhaps you [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant were looking for]] the trope called BigDamnHeroes. (Wherein the premise is played straight and the {{Hero}} Hero ''is'' in fact the only person who can save the day.) When the townsfolk are actively delaying the bad guys or doing other things to hinder them till the hero can get there, it is HoldTheLine. Also not to be confused with SheWillComeForMe, as the person in ''that'' trope usually does need the help.

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* Cell in ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'' pretty much sums up what happened to ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' after Goku unlocks Super Saiyan, where the even remotely capable cast CantCatchUp to the exponentially powerful Saiyans and their ''even more'' powerful offsprings and leave everything out for Goku to defeat and save the day. It's actually one of Abridged Vegeta's ''major'' [[BerserkButton berserk buttons]].
->So, 'prince', why don't you remember your place like the rest of them, ''and wait for Goku''.


* Anime/MyHeroAcademia plays with and examines this trope. In the world (and future) it's set in, 80% of the population have some form of superpower or Quirk. Despite this, crime by superpowered criminals was rampant despite the efforts of Heroes (who have to be highly trained, licensed and regulated; they are effectively civil servants). However, [[TheCape All Might]] strove to change this by being TheParagon, not only to serve and inspire other heroes by example, determination and skill, but also to cripple the morale of the villains. [[spoiler: The moment he retires, the villains start becoming more active, which was the goal of All Might's archenemy, All For One (a supervillain whose power is ''stealing other powers''), though he is defeated and jailed and leaves it to his protege to continue this rise in villainy, setting him up to be the archfoe of the protagonist and All Might's successor/protege, Izuku Midoriya.]]

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* Anime/MyHeroAcademia ''Anime/MyHeroAcademia'' plays with and examines this trope. In the world (and future) it's set in, 80% of the population have some form of superpower or Quirk. Despite this, crime by superpowered criminals was rampant despite the efforts of Heroes (who have to be highly trained, licensed and regulated; they are effectively civil servants). However, [[TheCape All Might]] strove to change this by being TheParagon, not only to serve and inspire other heroes by example, determination and skill, but also to cripple the morale of the villains. [[spoiler: The moment he retires, the villains start becoming more active, which was the goal of All Might's archenemy, All For One (a supervillain whose power is ''stealing other powers''), though he is defeated and jailed and leaves it to his protege to continue this rise in villainy, setting him up to be the archfoe ArchEnemy of [[TheHero the protagonist protagonist]] and All Might's successor/protege, Izuku "Deku" Midoriya.]]



* While the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series is a prime offender of this notion, it is subverted in the background story for ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker''. The only time that the trope is invoked before a hero is found, it fails, and the gods can do nothing but flood the land, leaving Ganon in stasis.
** An aversion shows up in ''Literature/HyruleHistoria'''s explanation of the timeline, which branches into three. One branching timeline begins with Link getting killed during the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]''. However, the knights of Hyrule and the seven sages manage to thwart and seal Ganon themselves after a great war, forming the backstory of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link To The Past]]''.

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* While the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series is a prime offender of this notion, it is subverted in the background story backstory for ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker''. ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker The only time that Wind Waker]]'', the trope is invoked before a hero is found, it fails, and first game in the "Adult Timeline". When [[BigBad Ganon]] eventually returns, the people of Hyrule are confident [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime the Hero of Time]] will return to defeat him once more... but he doesn't. Helpless, the citizens desperately pray to the gods can do nothing for assistance, who are left with no other option but to flood the land, leaving Hyrule to prevent Ganon in stasis.
from taking over.
** An aversion shows up in ''Literature/HyruleHistoria'''s explanation the beginning of the timeline, "Decline Timeline", in which branches into three. One branching timeline begins with [[TheBadGuyWins Link getting is killed during in the events of final battle with Ganon]] in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]''. However, the knights of Hyrule and the seven sages Sages manage to thwart and seal away Ganon in the corrupted Sacred Realm themselves after a great war, forming the backstory of ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link To The to the Past]]''.



* The Republic in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' had quite a lot of this, as Kreia points out in [=KOTOR=] 2. The Republic is incapable of handling the marauding Mandalorians until a few Jedi join them. Kreia even has a philosophy based on this. Helping people by solving their problems for them only makes them weaker by taking away to conflict that could have made them stronger. She's fine with the player "helping" people, but only so long as they player understands that what they're doing isn't actually helping those people, but helping themselves by making them dependent on the player.

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* The Republic in ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' had quite a lot of this, as Kreia points out in [=KOTOR=] 2. The Republic is incapable of handling the marauding Mandalorians until a few Jedi join them. Kreia even has a philosophy based on this. Helping people by solving their problems for them only makes them weaker by taking away to conflict that could have made them stronger. She's fine with the player "helping" people, but only so long as they the player understands that what they're doing isn't actually helping those people, but helping themselves by making them dependent on the player.



* In ''VideoGame/PokemonRanger'', the residents of Fall City needs Rangers' help for things like finding lost Pokémon, moving boxes, and lighting up dark rooms. Luckily, by the end, they become more self-reliant.



* In pretty much all ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, we see [[PoliceAreUseless useless police]] and ApatheticCitizens who wait for some random 10-year-old to do everything for them.
** Subverted and lampshaded in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''. Subverted in that several authority figures, including most of the Gym Leaders and the [[RetiredBadass retired Champion]], are trying to curb Team Plasma's more criminal acts, but fail because they don't have the information (or [[TheChosenOne destiny]]) that the player character does. The lampshading is mostly by Team Plasma members, who are pushing N to be the "hero" so they can [[AnimalWrongsGroup outlaw Pokemon husbandry]], and N himself who wishes the ApatheticCitizens cared as much as you do.

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* In pretty much all ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, we see [[PoliceAreUseless useless police]] and ApatheticCitizens who wait for [[PlayerCharacter some random 10-year-old 10-year-old]] to do everything for them.
** In ''VideoGame/PokemonRanger'', the residents of Fall City needs Rangers' help for things like finding lost Pokémon, moving boxes, and lighting up dark rooms. Luckily, by the end, they become more self-reliant.
** Subverted and lampshaded in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite''. Subverted in that several authority figures, including most of the Gym Leaders and the [[RetiredBadass retired Champion]], are trying to curb Team Plasma's more criminal acts, but fail because they don't have the information (or [[TheChosenOne destiny]]) that the player character does. you do. The lampshading is mostly by Team Plasma members, who are pushing N to be the "hero" so they can [[AnimalWrongsGroup outlaw Pokemon Pokémon husbandry]], and N himself himself, who wishes the ApatheticCitizens cared as much as you do.



* Happens in Spore's Space age, but it's only one way. If the player attacks another empire, a dozen or more ships which also continuously spawn more along with the turrets in each city will attack the player relentlessly, probably killing or driving off the player early on until the player gets the topmost upgrades. However, if one of the player's colonies or allies is attacked their planets offer only a token resistance expecially if they lack turrets while calling for the player to help them, and if the player doesn't show up, whatever planet was attacked is pretty much forfeit.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has one point where the main character has the option to do this after being captured and thrown in prison. You can either attempt to break out on your own (not terribly difficult, even without your gear), or simply say that you're sure your friends will rescue you and chose which two party members will attempt the jailbreak. This can lead to several SugarWiki/FunnyMoments based on your choices.

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* Happens in Spore's ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'''s Space age, but it's only one way. If the player attacks another empire, a dozen or more ships which also continuously spawn more along with the turrets in each city will attack the player relentlessly, probably killing or driving off the player early on until the player gets the topmost upgrades. However, if one of the player's colonies or allies is attacked their planets offer only a token resistance expecially if they lack turrets while calling for the player to help them, and if the player doesn't show up, whatever planet was attacked is pretty much forfeit.
* ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' has one point where [[PlayerCharacter the main character Warden]] has the option to do this after being captured and thrown in prison. You can either attempt to break out on your own (not terribly difficult, even without your gear), or simply say that you're sure your friends will rescue you and chose which two party members will attempt the jailbreak. This can lead to several SugarWiki/FunnyMoments based on your choices.



* Subverted in ''Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime'' when the Mother Glooperior asked two other slimes to help her move a heavy iron ball because it would've been unfair of them to expect Rocket to do ''everything''.

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* Subverted in ''Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime'' ''VideoGame/DragonQuestHeroesRocketSlime'' when the Mother Glooperior asked asks two other slimes to help her move a heavy iron ball ball, because it would've been unfair of them to expect Rocket [[PlayerCharacter Rocket]] to do ''everything''.

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* The opening of ''Film/{{Justice League 2017}}'' shows people yearning for the return of Superman to the tune of Sigrid's cover of the Music/LeonardCohen song [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siH48ak87kw "Everybody Knows"]].

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* In ''Literature/{{Renegades}}'', this is Nova's main problem with the eponymous superheroes: because the Renegades promise that they will take care of all the problems and protect everyone, no-one is trying to solve any of Gatlon City's innumerable issues on their own. People aren't interested in learning medicine because there are prodigies with HealingHands; the economy is near-stagnant because Renegades make money by selling their skills abroad; the police force is non-existent because Renegades patrol the streets; and no-one's bothered about the city turning into a (well-meaning, but still) dictature, because everyone assumes the Renegades will take care of everything.


* ''WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}}''deconstructs this trope by showing the effects of the mentality on the various parties involved when it seens the VillainProtagonist Megamind kills off the HeroAntagonist Metro Man:

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}}''deconstructs ''WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}}'' deconstructs this trope by showing the effects of the mentality on the various parties involved when it seens the VillainProtagonist Megamind kills off the HeroAntagonist Metro Man:



** In a deseperate attempt to alliviate this, Megaman gives someone else superpowers in an effort to find someone who'll challenge him, and when the newcomer kicks his ass, everyone flocks toward their new 'hero' Titan -- unfortunately for them (and Megamind), they haven't considered the possibility that someone having superpowers and beating up a villain doesn't mean they're not a potentially ''worse'' villain.

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** In a deseperate attempt to alliviate this, Megaman Megamind gives someone else superpowers in an effort to find someone who'll challenge him, and when the newcomer kicks his ass, everyone flocks toward their new 'hero' Titan -- unfortunately for them (and Megamind), they haven't considered the possibility that someone having superpowers and beating up a villain doesn't mean they're not a potentially ''worse'' villain.


* Anime/MyHeroAcademia plays with and examines this trope. In the world (and future) it's set in, 80% of the population have some form of superpower or Quirk. Despite this, crime by superpowered criminals was rampant despite the efforts of Heroes (who have to be highly trained, licensed and regulated; they are effectively civil servants). However, [[TheCape All Might]] strived to change this by being TheParagon, not only to serve and inspire other heroes with example, determination and skill, but also cripple the morale of villains. [[spoiler: The moment he retires, the villains start becoming more active, which was the goal of All Might's archenemy, All For One (a supervillain who's superpower is ''stealing other powers''), though he is defeated and jailed and leaves it to his protege to continue this rise in villan and setting him up to be the archfoe of the protagonist and All Might's successor/protege, Izuku Midoriya.]]

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* Anime/MyHeroAcademia plays with and examines this trope. In the world (and future) it's set in, 80% of the population have some form of superpower or Quirk. Despite this, crime by superpowered criminals was rampant despite the efforts of Heroes (who have to be highly trained, licensed and regulated; they are effectively civil servants). However, [[TheCape All Might]] strived strove to change this by being TheParagon, not only to serve and inspire other heroes with by example, determination and skill, but also to cripple the morale of the villains. [[spoiler: The moment he retires, the villains start becoming more active, which was the goal of All Might's archenemy, All For One (a supervillain who's superpower whose power is ''stealing other powers''), though he is defeated and jailed and leaves it to his protege to continue this rise in villan and villainy, setting him up to be the archfoe of the protagonist and All Might's successor/protege, Izuku Midoriya.]]



** Commissioner Gordon often has the worry of relying too much on Batman to patrol Gotham, and points it out in ''Comicbook/BatmanNoMansLand'' by claiming that he can't get himself hired anywhere because his reliance on an "urban legend" damages his credibility. Usually though, he has to admit that the corrupt and perpetually-underfunded police department couldn't handle Gotham's crime rate before with normal mobsters and certianly not now in the face of a bunch insane supervillains (and the even more insane but BadassNormal Joker.)

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** Commissioner Gordon often has the worry of relying too much on Batman to patrol Gotham, and points it out in ''Comicbook/BatmanNoMansLand'' by claiming that he can't get himself hired anywhere because his reliance on an "urban legend" damages his credibility. Usually though, he has to admit that the corrupt and perpetually-underfunded police department couldn't handle Gotham's crime rate before with normal mobsters and certianly certainly not now in the face of a bunch insane supervillains (and the even more insane but BadassNormal Joker.)



* In the first arc of ''ComicBook/{{JLA}}'', Superman explains why superhumans haven't done all the things the Hyperclan ([[spoiler:secretly White Martians conning the planet to trust them]]) are doing: it causes people to be even more unwilling to solve their own problems.

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* In the first arc of ''ComicBook/{{JLA}}'', Superman explains why superhumans haven't done all the things the Hyperclan ([[spoiler:secretly White Martians conning the planet to trust into trusting them]]) are doing: it causes people to be even more unwilling to solve their own problems.



* Invoked in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone''. Hagrid tells Harry that the reason wizards hide from the normal world is precisely to avoid this trope. People would request magical assistance for all their problems, so they'd never advance on their own. It's certainly demonstrated that it works in a roundabout way: magical society has become so dependent on their own abilities that its technology became stale centuries ago, and people who are born without magical powers (squibs) are either forced to leave with normal people (muggles) or relegated to menial jobs, and being dependent of others for such normal things as transport.

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* Invoked in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone''. Hagrid tells Harry that the reason wizards hide from the normal world is precisely to avoid this trope. People would request magical assistance for all their problems, so they'd never advance on their own. It's certainly demonstrated that it works in a roundabout way: magical society has become so dependent on their own abilities that its technology became stale centuries ago, and people who are born without magical powers (squibs) are either forced to leave live with normal people (muggles) or relegated to menial jobs, and while being dependent of on others for such normal things as transport.



* Averted in ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Turn Left": [[spoiler: The episode shows an alternate timeline where the Doctor ends up dying and thus the Earth is robbed of its greatest protector in a hostile universe. However, Humanity wasn't sitting around waiting for a hero but instead successfully fought off several threats that were defeated by the Doctor in the original timeline. Unfortunately, the methods and means used resulted in mass amounts of casualities that added up and lead to devastating consequences.]]

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* Averted in ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Turn Left": [[spoiler: The episode shows an alternate timeline where the Doctor ends up dying and thus the Earth is robbed of its greatest protector in a hostile universe. However, Humanity humanity wasn't sitting around waiting for a hero but instead successfully fought off several threats that were defeated by the Doctor in the original timeline. Unfortunately, the methods and means used resulted in mass amounts of casualities huge casualties that added up and lead led to devastating consequences.]]



** In general, ''Buffy'' tends to rely on this - it's hinted that most people in Sunnydale are aware of what's going on but choose to ''pretend'' to be oblivious in the hope that [[BystanderSyndrome someone else will take care of it]], and anyone who is aware of the town's "secret" other than the hero and her friends and actually does something about it is generally a malevolent schemer with their own sinister plans. Furthermore, in the early seasons especially, much is made of the necessity for keeping Buffy's mission a secret without it ever being made clear ''why'' this is necessary, especially not to fill in Buffy's mom on what's happening.

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** In general, ''Buffy'' tends to rely on this - -- it's hinted that most people in Sunnydale are aware of what's going on but choose to ''pretend'' to be oblivious in the hope that [[BystanderSyndrome someone else will take care of it]], and anyone who is aware of the town's "secret" other than the hero and her friends and actually does something about it is generally a malevolent schemer with their own sinister plans. Furthermore, in the early seasons especially, much is made of the necessity for keeping Buffy's mission a secret without it ever being made clear ''why'' this is necessary, especially not to fill in Buffy's mom on what's happening.



* This is taken to almost absurd proportions in one episode of ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Xena and her entourage enter a town just in time for a feud between two nobleman houses to erupt into all-out war, with a tragic, bloody conclusion. But then, a GroundhogDayLoop starts, which threatens to start the battle again. Xena tries everything to stop the loop; she tries getting the two families to make peace, and ''succeeds'', but that doesn't stop it; she makes them angry enough at ''her'' to [[GenghisGambit get them to stop fighting]], but still, the loop happens. Finally, a young man tells her why it's happening: he and the daughter of the opposing house were StarCrossedLovers, and mades a deal with Cupid to have the day repeat itself until he finds a way to keep his lover from killing herself and their families from killing each other; until a "Hero would come along to save [the girl], make peace between the houses and end the loop." He had numerous chances to tell Xena, but the thing is:

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* This is taken to almost absurd proportions in one episode of ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Xena and her entourage enter a town just in time for a feud between two nobleman noble houses to erupt into all-out war, with a tragic, bloody conclusion. But then, a GroundhogDayLoop starts, which threatens to start the battle again. Xena tries everything to stop the loop; she tries getting the two families to make peace, and ''succeeds'', but that doesn't stop it; she makes them angry enough at ''her'' to [[GenghisGambit get them to stop fighting]], but still, the loop happens. Finally, a young man tells her why it's happening: he and the daughter of the opposing house were StarCrossedLovers, and mades a deal with Cupid to have the day repeat itself until he finds a way to keep his lover from killing herself and their families from killing each other; until a "Hero would come along to save [the girl], make peace between the houses and end the loop." He had numerous chances to tell Xena, but the thing is:



** Despite this blow to her pride, and nearly being driven crazy trying to sort it out, Xena is able to save the day by using logic - and her trusty chakram - after analyzing the countless loops she had to go through.

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** Despite this blow to her pride, and nearly being driven crazy trying to sort it out, Xena is able to save the day by using logic - -- and her trusty chakram - -- after analyzing the countless loops she had to go through.



* The quest givers in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' will sometimes fall into this. Sure the racial capitals have level 80-something guards patrolling the streets, the throne rooms have level 80-something elites standing by, and the starter areas have ''level 90 elites'' standing around doing very little, but they can still send level 5 players to take care of the local orc problem. Some of the quest givers are just people who send the players to collect those TwentyBearAsses, even though it's their jobs, but because they're either very tired or just too lazy to do it. You'll also sometimes run into a very high-leveled quest giver in a low-level area who asks you to take care of a problem they're perfectly capable of handling, sometimes not even seeming that busy.

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* The quest givers quest-givers in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' will sometimes fall into this. Sure Sure, the racial capitals have level 80-something guards patrolling the streets, the throne rooms have level 80-something elites standing by, and the starter areas have ''level 90 elites'' standing around doing very little, but they can still send level 5 players to take care of the local orc problem. Some of the quest givers quest-givers are just people who send the players to collect those TwentyBearAsses, even though it's their jobs, but because they're either very tired or just too lazy to do it. You'll also sometimes run into a very high-leveled quest giver in a low-level area who asks you to take care of a problem they're perfectly capable of handling, sometimes not even seeming that busy.



* ''WebVideo/DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'' is a deconstruction of this concept. The city worships its super heroes and relies on them to fight evil regardless of their personal qualities, which allows Captain Hammer to get away with being a total jerk to everyone who isn't as strong as he is. Captain Hammer's [[JerkJock boorish]] behavior is what turns Doctor Horrible into a super villain, and their squabble over the one person who is genuinely trying to make the city a better place ends up [[spoiler:killing her]].

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* ''WebVideo/DoctorHorriblesSingAlongBlog'' is a deconstruction of this concept. The city worships its super heroes superheroes and relies on them to fight evil regardless of their personal qualities, which allows Captain Hammer to get away with being a total jerk to everyone who isn't as strong as he is. Captain Hammer's [[JerkJock boorish]] behavior is what turns Doctor Horrible into a super villain, and their squabble over the one person who is genuinely trying to make the city a better place ends up [[spoiler:killing her]].



** Also inverted, in that many police departments tend to encourage something like this trope and discourage regular citizens from trying to take the law into their own hands or acting as heroes in dangerous situations such as crimes (beyond calling the emergency services when necessary, performing basic first aid if trained or doing what's necessary to keep someone alive, of course). This is usually under the rationale that the emergency services are trained to deal with these situations, and an untrained citizen who barges in half-cocked trying to be a hero will often end up making things worse, putting themselves in danger or even getting themselves killed.

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** Also inverted, in that many police departments tend to encourage something like this trope and discourage regular citizens from trying to take the law into their own hands or acting as heroes in dangerous situations such as crimes (beyond calling the emergency services when necessary, performing basic first aid if trained trained, or doing what's necessary to keep someone alive, of course). This is usually under the rationale that the emergency services are trained to deal with these situations, and an untrained citizen who barges in half-cocked trying to be a hero will often end up making things worse, putting themselves in danger danger, or even getting themselves killed.

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