Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / HintSystem

Go To



* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' usually has a supporting character do it on failure of after reaching a certain part of a stage. In the ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' series there are hint monitors on the treasure hunting stages. Up to three hints can be used on a single emerald shard and they get more obvious with each hint.

to:

* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'' usually has a supporting character do it on failure of after reaching a certain part of a stage. In the ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' series there are hint monitors on the treasure hunting stages. Up to three hints can be used on a single emerald shard and they get more obvious with each hint.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' and its sequels have tips that appear during the loading screen when moving onto the next level. VS mode also have tips for its game mode.


Added DiffLines:

* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games have either the assistant or the player character giving vague hints if you press a certain part of a witness's testimony that is suspect, nudging you to look further into it. ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' and ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'' will have your assistant outright tell you what part of the testimony contains the contradiction if you keep fumbling about, but you still have to figure out on your own what piece of evidence to use.


* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' does it with MissionControl on request and occasionally on failure. For example, if you call the Colonel enough times when fighting Psycho Mantis he'll tell you the secret to beating him. If you fight for long enough the colonel will call you to give you the hint.

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' does it with MissionControl on request and occasionally on failure. For example, if you call the Colonel enough times when fighting Psycho Mantis he'll tell you the secret to beating him. If you fight for long enough the colonel will call you to give you the hint.


* Most recent ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' games have some sort of adviser reminding you where to go next.

to:

* Most recent Later ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' games have some sort of adviser reminding you where to go next.



** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' also has a fortune teller who can provide hints for a fee, either on where to go next or where to find heart pieces.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'', and the 3DS remake of ''Ocarina of Time'' before it, has the Sheikah Stone, who tells you how to do anything from completing sidequests to fighting bosses if you're having trouble with them.

to:

** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'' also has both have a fortune teller who can provide hints for a fee, either on where to go next or where to find heart pieces.
Heart Pieces.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'', and the 3DS remake of ''Ocarina of Time'' before it, has both have the Sheikah Stone, who tells you how to do anything from completing sidequests to fighting bosses if you're having trouble with them.



* Telltale Games' ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' games use the "hint on delay" variant.
** The hints aren't exactly straightforward, though. Dawdling can be fun.

to:

* Telltale Games' ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' games use the "hint on delay" variant.
**
variant. The hints aren't exactly straightforward, though. Dawdling can be fun.



* ''VideoGame/StrongBadsCoolGameForAttractivePeople'' has a setting to change the frequency of hints. One of the episodes even requires you to have the hints set on "high" at one point for HundredPercentCompletion.
** Also, some of the Drive-Thru Whale's bizarre ramblings are actually cryptic hints. In "Strong Badia the Free", "Immolate your brother, please" indicates you need to [[spoiler: burn the flag, constitution, and bill of rights of Strong Sad's country Bleak House in order to conquer it.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/StrongBadsCoolGameForAttractivePeople'' has a setting to change the frequency of hints. One of the episodes even requires you to have the hints set on "high" at one point for HundredPercentCompletion.
**
HundredPercentCompletion. Also, some of the Drive-Thru Whale's bizarre ramblings are actually cryptic hints. In "Strong Badia the Free", "Immolate your brother, please" indicates you need to [[spoiler: burn the flag, constitution, and bill of rights of Strong Sad's country Bleak House in order to conquer it.]]



* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}} IV'' has a hint system which gives different levels of hints in case the player doesn't want to be completely spoiled. Level 1 usually gives you just the most basic idea of what the puzzle is about, level 2 gets more involved and can tell you where to find the clues you need, while level 3 is just a walkthrough of the puzzle.
** Notably, this actually effects the game to a minor degree. At some point you have to earn the blessing of a spirit guide to enter the DreamWorld; the guide you get will be either water, air or fire, depending on how many hints you've used.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}} IV'' has a hint system which gives different levels of hints in case the player doesn't want to be completely spoiled. Level 1 usually gives you just the most basic idea of what the puzzle is about, level 2 gets more involved and can tell you where to find the clues you need, while level 3 is just a walkthrough of the puzzle.
**
puzzle. Notably, this actually effects the game to a minor degree. At some point you have to earn the blessing of a spirit guide to enter the DreamWorld; the guide you get will be either water, air or fire, depending on how many hints you've used.



* The ''VideoGame/TexMurphy'' games series has a hint guide built into the game itself. Each incremental hint cost a certain number of points (gained by solving puzzles) and the system was structured so that it was impossible to "look ahead".
** ''Martian Memorandum'' has a "Help" option, which, when clicked, allows you to choose any object in the room (including ones [[InterfaceSpoiler you haven't found yet]]) and tells you exactly what you're supposed to do with it.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/TexMurphy'' games series has a hint guide built into the game itself. Each incremental hint cost a certain number of points (gained by solving puzzles) and the system was structured so that it was impossible to "look ahead".
**
ahead". Meanwhile, ''Martian Memorandum'' has a "Help" option, which, when clicked, allows you to choose any object in the room (including ones [[InterfaceSpoiler you haven't found yet]]) and tells you exactly what you're supposed to do with it.



* Sierra used to make a bundle off selling hints for its adventure games. There was a hint hotline you could call for a fee, and they sold hint books where the hints were written in invisible ink and you could reveal them with a special marker. Hints were given gradually, starting with subtle hints and progressing to an outright walkthrough solution. Later, the invisible ink was replaced with an obscuring grid of red lines and you used a translucent red window to read them. To avoid spoiling the game with the questions alone, some of the questions would always be fake ones - and if you read the hints for a fake question, the hint book would mock you.
** Parodied in ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIV'', where at one point, in order to advance, Roger has to buy the ''Space Quest IV'' hint book in-game, which is styled exactly like Sierra's actual hint books, fake questions and all.

to:

* Sierra used to make a bundle off selling hints for its adventure games. There was a hint hotline you could call for a fee, and they sold hint books where the hints were written in invisible ink and you could reveal them with a special marker. Hints were given gradually, starting with subtle hints and progressing to an outright walkthrough solution. Later, the invisible ink was replaced with an obscuring grid of red lines and you used a translucent red window to read them. To avoid spoiling the game with the questions alone, some of the questions would always be fake ones - and if you read the hints for a fake question, the hint book would mock you.
** Parodied
you. This is parodied in ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIV'', where at one point, in order to advance, Roger has to buy the ''Space Quest IV'' hint book in-game, which is styled exactly like Sierra's actual hint books, fake questions and all.



* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' usually has a supporting character do it on failure of after reaching a certain part of a stage.
** In the SonicAdventureSeries there are hint monitors on the treasure hunting stages. Up to three hints can be used on a single emerald shard and they get more obvious with each hint.

to:

* ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' usually has a supporting character do it on failure of after reaching a certain part of a stage.
**
stage. In the SonicAdventureSeries ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' series there are hint monitors on the treasure hunting stages. Up to three hints can be used on a single emerald shard and they get more obvious with each hint.



* ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' use the "hint on payment" system, using coins you find across the game world. Each puzzle has three progressively-better hints, each costing one coin each (the third game introduces Super Hints after these three which cost two coins and usually consist of solving half the puzzle for you).

to:

* ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'':
** The games
use the "hint on payment" system, using coins you find across the game world. Each puzzle has three progressively-better hints, each costing one coin each (the third game introduces Super Hints after these three which cost two coins and usually consist of solving half the puzzle for you).



** Sometimes when the game notices that you're taking a while about figuring out a solution, it flashes the hints button in the corner of the screen.

to:

** Sometimes Sometimes, when the game notices that you're taking a while about figuring out a solution, it flashes the hints button in the corner of the screen.



* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' does it with MissionControl on request and occasionally on failure.
** For example, if you call the Colonel enough times when fighting Psycho Mantis he'll tell you the secret to beating him. If you fight for long enough the colonel will call you to give you the hint.

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear'' does it with MissionControl on request and occasionally on failure.
**
failure. For example, if you call the Colonel enough times when fighting Psycho Mantis he'll tell you the secret to beating him. If you fight for long enough the colonel will call you to give you the hint.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioOdyssey'' has three different methods of obtaining hints to moons: Hint Toad (pay 50 coins and the location of a moon will be marked on the map), Uncle amiibo (tap an Toys/{{amiibo}} figures and, five minutes later, the location of a moon will be marked on the map for free), and Talkatoo (gives you the titles of up to three moons at a time for free, which may help find them).


So in order to include puzzles hard enough for the HardCore while still giving all players a good chance of beating the game without resorting to a guide, the developer can include a HintSystem. It can either give players a small nudge in the right direction or smack them upside the head with the board of knowledge and show them the full solution. Many systems will give progressively more helpful hints until the player catches on, so as to give as little help as they can and therefore preserve as much of the satisfaction of beating the puzzle as possible.

to:

So in order to include puzzles hard enough for the HardCore while still giving all players a good chance of beating the game without resorting to a guide, the developer can include a HintSystem.Hint System. It can either give players a small nudge in the right direction or smack them upside the head with the board of knowledge and show them the full solution. Many systems will give progressively more helpful hints until the player catches on, so as to give as little help as they can and therefore preserve as much of the satisfaction of beating the puzzle as possible.


** Finally, ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds'' has the same Fortune Teller than A Link to the Past, who offers useful-if-simple hints for a Rupee fee, and the much more helpful Hint Ghosts, which can only be seen if you wear the Hint Glasses and give direct clues in exchange for a Play Coin.

to:

** Finally, ''Videogame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds'' has the same Fortune Teller than A as ''A Link to the Past, Past'', who offers useful-if-simple hints for a Rupee fee, and the much more helpful Hint Ghosts, which can only be seen if you wear the Hint Glasses and give direct clues in exchange for a Play Coin.

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/HotlineMiami'' has a random tip show up before each level, such as "You can shoot through some walls" or "Recklessness is rewarded." [[spoiler:This gets an InterfaceScrew before the [[WhamEpisode "Trauma" chapter]], where you character wakes up from a coma; the "tips" showing up before this chapter include selections such as "You're all alone now" or "Stop breathing".]]


* In the Xbox360 installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Onechanbara}}'' series, death is met with a few tips which are apparently randomly generated, often having little to do with how you died or which stage you were playing.

to:

* In the Xbox360 UsefulNotes/Xbox360 installment of the ''VideoGame/{{Onechanbara}}'' series, death is met with a few tips which are apparently randomly generated, often having little to do with how you died or which stage you were playing.


* {{Sierra}} game series of ''VideoGame/DrBrain'' has you earn hint coins depending on how well you do on puzzles, though using these decreases your overall [[LastLousyPoint score]] and you can only use a set amount depending on the puzzle.

to:

* {{Sierra}} {{Creator/Sierra}} game series of ''VideoGame/DrBrain'' has you earn hint coins depending on how well you do on puzzles, though using these decreases your overall [[LastLousyPoint score]] and you can only use a set amount depending on the puzzle.


* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'' allow players to be this for each other, by using a special item to write and rate messages from a template. These messages then become visible in other players' games. Though, there's nothing stopping them from putting down downright lies.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'' allow players to be this for each other, by using a special item to write and rate messages from a template. These messages then become visible in other players' games. Though, there's nothing stopping them from putting down downright lies. You'd be hard-pressed to find any cliff or BottomlessPit anywhere in these games without multiple messages next to it that say "[[SuicideDare try jumping]]".


* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'' allow players to be this for each other, by using a special item to write and rate messages from a template. Though, there's nothing stopping them from putting down downright lies.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', and ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}'' allow players to be this for each other, by using a special item to write and rate messages from a template. These messages then become visible in other players' games. Though, there's nothing stopping them from putting down downright lies.


There are a number of different forms a HintSystem can take:

to:

There are a number of different forms a HintSystem hint system can take:



[[folder: Action Adventure ]]

to:

[[folder: Action Adventure ]]
[[folder:Action Adventure]]






[[folder: Action Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Action Game ]]
[[folder:Action Game]]






[[folder: Adventure Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Adventure Game ]]
[[folder:Adventure Game]]



* ''ZackAndWiki'' has a Hint on payment system, where the player buys hint coupons to be redeemed later.

to:

* ''ZackAndWiki'' ''VideoGame/ZackAndWiki'' has a Hint on payment system, where the player buys hint coupons to be redeemed later.



* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}IV'' has a hint system which gives different levels of hints in case the player doesn't want to be completely spoiled. Level 1 usually gives you just the most basic idea of what the puzzle is about, level 2 gets more involved and can tell you where to find the clues you need, while level 3 is just a walkthrough of the puzzle.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}IV'' ''VideoGame/{{Myst}} IV'' has a hint system which gives different levels of hints in case the player doesn't want to be completely spoiled. Level 1 usually gives you just the most basic idea of what the puzzle is about, level 2 gets more involved and can tell you where to find the clues you need, while level 3 is just a walkthrough of the puzzle.






[[folder: First Person Shooter ]]

to:

[[folder: First [[folder:First Person Shooter ]]
Shooter]]






[[folder: Fighting Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Fighting Game ]]
[[folder:Fighting Game]]






[[folder: General ]]

to:

[[folder: General ]]
[[folder:General]]



** Parodied in ''[[VideoGame/SpaceQuest Space Quest IV]]'', where at one point, in order to advance, Roger has to buy the ''Space Quest IV'' hint book in-game, which is styled exactly like Sierra's actual hint books, fake questions and all.

to:

** Parodied in ''[[VideoGame/SpaceQuest Space Quest IV]]'', ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIV'', where at one point, in order to advance, Roger has to buy the ''Space Quest IV'' hint book in-game, which is styled exactly like Sierra's actual hint books, fake questions and all.






[[folder: Platform Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Platform Game ]]
[[folder:Platform Game]]






[[folder: Puzzle Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Puzzle Game ]]
[[folder:Puzzle Game]]



* ''ProfessorLayton'' use the "hint on payment" system, using coins you find across the game world. Each puzzle has three progressively-better hints, each costing one coin each (the third game introduces Super Hints after these three which cost two coins and usually consist of solving half the puzzle for you).

to:

* ''ProfessorLayton'' ''VideoGame/ProfessorLayton'' use the "hint on payment" system, using coins you find across the game world. Each puzzle has three progressively-better hints, each costing one coin each (the third game introduces Super Hints after these three which cost two coins and usually consist of solving half the puzzle for you).






[[folder: Roguelike ]]

to:

[[folder: Roguelike ]]
[[folder:Roguelike]]






[[folder: Role Playing Game ]]

* ''VideoGame/{{Earthbound}}'' had a RecurringTraveller selling hints. This was less useful in the American release, where the game came packaged with a StrategyGuide.

to:

[[folder: Role [[folder:Role Playing Game ]]

Game]]
* ''VideoGame/{{Earthbound}}'' had a RecurringTraveller selling hints. This was less useful in the American release, where the game release which came packaged with a StrategyGuide.




to:

* ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'''s pause screen displays a hint randomly selected from a pool of several. ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' relegates them to the {{loading screen}}s instead.



[[folder: Shoot Em Up ]]

to:

[[folder: Shoot [[folder:Shoot Em Up ]]
Up]]






[[folder: Stealth Based Game ]]

to:

[[folder: Stealth [[folder:Stealth Based Game ]]
Game]]






[[folder: Visual Novel ]]

to:

[[folder: Visual Novel ]]
[[folder:Visual Novel]]






[[folder: Literature ]]

to:

[[folder: Literature ]]
[[folder:Literature]]



[[folder: Pinball ]]

to:

[[folder: Pinball ]]
[[folder:Pinball]]





** In a rare example of a ''guidebook'' doing this, some releases of ''VideoGame/Riven'' came with a rather thick spoiler guide - which also had a bit of lore added to it, just as a bonus. There were multiple chapters: earlier ones would give oblique hints to the puzzles, while later ones would add more detail, and at the end, they just gave up and told the player how to solve them.


** In a rare example of a ''guidebook'' doing this, some releases of ''VideoGame/Riven'' came with a rather thick spoiler guide - which also had a bit of lore added to it, just as a bonus. There were multiple chapters: earlier ones would give oblique hints to the puzzles, while later ones would add more detail, and at the end, they just gave up and told the player how to solve them.



* In VideoGame/IHaveNoMouthAndIMustScream, every character has a psych profile provided by AM that contains information about them as well as actual hints regarding what to do. Problem is, seeing that AM knows the characters so well is a hit on their sanity.
* In {{Videogame/Yesterday}} you can ask for a hint if you are stuck.

to:

* In VideoGame/IHaveNoMouthAndIMustScream, ''VideoGame/IHaveNoMouthAndIMustScream'', every character has a psych profile provided by AM that contains information about them as well as actual hints regarding what to do. Problem is, seeing that AM knows the characters so well is a hit on their sanity.
* In {{Videogame/Yesterday}} ''{{Videogame/Yesterday}}'' you can ask for a hint if you are stuck.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 112

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report