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* The ethics of this are played with in [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/363684/1/The-Locket-of-Love Locket Of Love]] when Imp falls under a spell that causes him to become devoted to Adora. Bow is perfectly willing to use Imp's skills against the Horde for as long as the Rebellion has him, and even suggest Adora string him along a bit to comply, stating that the Horde would have no problem doing the same if the situation were reversed. Not surprisingly Adora, who has spent much for her life brainwashed as an agent of evil, is against such a plan, pointing out that the Rebels can't simply sink to the Horde's level when its convenient.

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* In dialogue from ''{{VideoGame/Warframe}}'s'' Jovian Concord update, [[spoiler:[[MissionControl Lotus]]]] implies this is the reason she acted the way she did for most of the game's history.


* Played with in the ''Literature/RebelForce'' series. A brainwashed Imperial assassin, X-7, has been trying to kill Luke Skywalker, but his continuing failures and time away from his master shakes the brainwashing--not much, but enough that he's bothered by stray emotions and fragments of memory with no context to them. He goes rogue in order to search for his obliterated past--the Rebels, aware of this, decide to set things up to convince him that he's the long-lost brother of one of them, in the hopes of turning him against the Empire. It's much milder than what was done to him in the first place, but still harsh. [[spoiler: And has very mixed results.]] The brother in question comes to believe that X-7 used to be his brother, then doubts it again[[spoiler:-and the books themselves never quite confirm or deny it.]]
** In the next book Luke Skywalker pulls off a much kinder example [[spoiler: on a base full of people who'd undergone similar brainwashing. He uses a desperate wide-scale JediMindTrick to ''undo'' the Imperial brainwashing, leaving it a base full of people who were confused and didn't know who or where they were--he couldn't restore the memories that had been lost--but didn't think and act as appendages of the BigBad anymore.]]

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* Played with in the ''Literature/RebelForce'' series. A brainwashed Imperial assassin, X-7, has been trying to kill Luke Skywalker, but his continuing failures and time away from his master shakes the brainwashing--not much, but enough that he's bothered by stray emotions and fragments of memory with no context to them. He goes rogue in order to search for his obliterated past--the Rebels, aware of this, decide to set things up to convince him that he's the long-lost brother of one of them, in the hopes of turning him against the Empire. It's much milder than what was done to him in the first place, but still harsh. [[spoiler: And has very mixed results.]] The brother in question comes starts to believe suspect that [[AccidentalTruth X-7 used to be actually is his brother, long-lost brother]], then doubts it again[[spoiler:-and then both of them end up dying with the books themselves never quite confirm or deny it.truth of the matter left ambiguous.]]
** In the next book Luke Skywalker pulls off a much kinder example [[spoiler: on a base full of people who'd undergone similar brainwashing. He uses a desperate wide-scale JediMindTrick to ''undo'' the Imperial brainwashing, leaving it a base full of people who were confused and didn't know who or where they were--he couldn't restore the memories that had been lost--but didn't wouldn't think and act as appendages of the BigBad anymore.]]


* ''[[Comicbook/GhostRider Ghost Rider's]]'' [[MindRape Penance Stare]] occasionally has this effect, although forcing people to feel all the pain they have inflicted on the innocent is more a [[ThouShaltNotKill punishment]] than anything else. If a HeelRealization results in a change of heart, it's all you.

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** In ''ComicBook/{{Exiles}}'', the reality-altering, body-swapping villain Proteus [[spoiler: takes over [[ShapeShifting Morph's]] body, which doesn't degrade like other bodies Proteus inhabits do. The team manage to use some AppliedPhlebotinum (from the world of the ComicBook/SquadronSupreme mentioned above, in fact) in order to brainwash Proteus into [[BecomingTheMask thinking he IS Morph]]. However, the ramifications of this action are explored in future issues.]] It does help that Proteus WAS planning on making the entire universe his plaything.
* ''[[Comicbook/GhostRider Ghost Rider's]]'' ComicBook/GhostRider's [[MindRape Penance Stare]] occasionally has this effect, although forcing people to feel all the pain they have inflicted on the innocent is more a [[ThouShaltNotKill punishment]] than anything else. If a HeelRealization results in a change of heart, it's all you.



* In Volume 5 of ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}'', [[spoiler: we find out that Mind*** [[strike:did]] habitually does this... to herself.]]

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* In Volume 5 of ''Comicbook/{{Empowered}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Empowered}}'', [[spoiler: we find out that Mind*** [[strike:did]] habitually does this... to herself.]]



* In the ComicBook/XMen SpinOff ''Comicbook/{{Exiles}}'', the reality-altering, body-swapping villain Proteus [[spoiler: takes over [[ShapeShifting Morph's]] body, which doesn't degrade like other bodies Proteus inhabits do. The team manage to use some AppliedPhlebotinum (from the world of the ComicBook/SquadronSupreme mentioned above, in fact) in order to brainwash Proteus into [[BecomingTheMask thinking he IS Morph]]. However, the ramifications of this action are explored in future issues.]] It does help that Proteus WAS planning on making the entire universe his plaything.
* When [[ComicBook/MartianManhunter J'onn J'onzz]] undoes a mental block that makes him afraid of fire and unconsciously sends himself into a FaceHeelTurn, one of his first "evil" acts is to use his mental powers to perform this on various criminals. Inmates in high class prisons begin watching Sesame Street, the patients in Arkham are suddenly overcome with grief over their crimes and have to be restrained from committing suicide, KKK members begin lynching ''themselves,'' and ComicBook/LexLuthor (at the time president) is put into a coma.
* ''Comicbook/GreenLantern'':

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* In the ComicBook/XMen SpinOff ''Comicbook/{{Exiles}}'', the reality-altering, body-swapping villain Proteus [[spoiler: takes over [[ShapeShifting Morph's]] body, which doesn't degrade like other bodies Proteus inhabits do. The team manage to use some AppliedPhlebotinum (from the world of the ComicBook/SquadronSupreme mentioned above, in fact) in order to brainwash Proteus into [[BecomingTheMask thinking he IS Morph]]. However, the ramifications of this action are explored in future issues.]] It does help that Proteus WAS planning on making the entire universe his plaything.
* When [[ComicBook/MartianManhunter J'onn J'onzz]] ComicBook/MartianManhunter undoes a mental block that makes him afraid of fire and unconsciously sends himself into a FaceHeelTurn, one of his first "evil" acts is to use his mental powers to perform this on various criminals. Inmates in high class prisons begin watching Sesame Street, the patients in Arkham are suddenly overcome with grief over their crimes and have to be restrained from committing suicide, KKK members begin lynching ''themselves,'' and ComicBook/LexLuthor (at the time president) is put into a coma.
* ''Comicbook/GreenLantern'': ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'':



* ''UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks'':
** Two Silver Age {{Superman}} [[{{Elseworlds}} "Imaginary Stories"]] featured this trope.
** The first, "Superman-Red and Superman-Blue," had Superman split into the titular super-genius versions of himself. They then create an "Anti-Evil Ray," which they then upload to a bunch of satellites and bombard the planet with. Sure enough, the ray brainwashes everyone into being "good," which leads to [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans a perfect world, free from disease, crime, and war.]]
** The second has Luthor get [[MindRape Mind Raped]] by psychic aliens until all evil is removed from him. He then marries Lois Lane, has a son, and [[CutLexLuthorACheck becomes the world's most famous and beloved scientist.]] [[spoiler: That is, until his son grows up, becomes a supervillain, and murders him.]]
** A Silver Age non-imaginary event was Superman reprogramming Brainiac to force him to be good. He later forced him back to being evil against his wishes to acquire information and help against a leftover Brainiac super-weapon knowing he couldn't make Brainiac good again. This indirectly lead to Brainiac's transformation from the humanoid form to the more commonly remembered metallic silver shape and flying skullship.
** Another non-imaginary one from the Silver Age is a World's Finest story where Superman and Batman wind up on an alternate Earth where they were raised as criminals and are now some of the deadliest villains in the world. The duo take down their evil counterparts and brainwash them into becoming good like they are.

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* ''UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks'':
''Franchise/{{Superman}}'':
** Two Silver Age {{Superman}} [[{{Elseworlds}} "Imaginary Stories"]] featured this trope.
**
Imaginary Story "Superman Vol. 1 #162: The first, "Superman-Red Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman-Blue," Superman-Blue!" had Superman split into the titular super-genius versions of himself. They then create an "Anti-Evil Ray," which they then upload to a bunch of satellites and bombard the planet with. For her part, ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} releases the {{Phantom Zone}}rs and uses the ray on them. Sure enough, the ray brainwashes everyone into being "good," which leads to [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans a perfect world, free from disease, crime, and war.]]
** The second Another Silver Age imaginary story has Luthor ComicBook/LexLuthor get [[MindRape Mind Raped]] by psychic aliens until all evil is removed from him. He then marries Lois Lane, ComicBook/LoisLane, has a son, and [[CutLexLuthorACheck becomes the world's most famous and beloved scientist.]] [[spoiler: That is, until his son grows up, becomes a supervillain, and murders him.]]
** A Silver Age non-imaginary event was Superman reprogramming Brainiac ComicBook/{{Brainiac}} to force him to be good. He later forced him back to being evil against his wishes to acquire information and help against a leftover Brainiac super-weapon knowing he couldn't make Brainiac good again. This indirectly lead to Brainiac's transformation from the humanoid form to the more commonly remembered metallic silver shape and flying skullship.
** Another non-imaginary one from the Silver Age is a World's Finest story where Superman and Batman Franchise/{{Batman}} wind up on an alternate Earth where they were raised as criminals and are now some of the deadliest villains in the world. The duo take down their evil counterparts and brainwash them into becoming good like they are.are.
** The moral ambiguity of this is played up ''hard'' in ''ComicBook/SupermanRedSon'', where after his ship landed in the [=USSR=] instead of Kansas, Kal-El became a champion of the Soviet Union. Superman only wants peace but has little trouble [[TheEvilsOfFreeWill eliminating free will]] to get it, and believes that brain-washing and overwriting a person's personality is far more humane a solution than gulags or prison camps. It's slowly made clear that due to his different upbringing, this Superman sees free will as more of a problem than anything else and [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans seeks peace and perfection at the sake of choice]].



* ''Comicbook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''

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* ''Comicbook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''



** When Earth-Man, the villain of the arc that reintroduced the original incarnation of the Legion in TheNewTens, was made a Legionnaire to placate his supporters in Earthgov, Brainiac 5 made a special flight ring which, among other things, contained "morality enhancement" features. This seems to have moderated how he expressed his views rather than completely alter them, turning him from a xenophobic cult leader into a NobleBigotWithABadge.

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** When Earth-Man, the villain of the arc that reintroduced the original incarnation of the Legion in TheNewTens, ''ComicBook/SupermanAndTheLegionOfSuperHeroes'', was made a Legionnaire to placate his supporters in Earthgov, Brainiac 5 made a special flight ring which, among other things, contained "morality enhancement" features. This seems to have moderated how he expressed his views rather than completely alter them, turning him from a xenophobic cult leader into a NobleBigotWithABadge.



* The moral ambiguity of this is played up ''hard'' in ''Comicbook/SupermanRedSon'', where after his ship landed in the [=USSR=] instead of Kansas, Kal-El became a champion of the Soviet Union. Superman only wants peace but has little trouble [[TheEvilsOfFreeWill eliminating free will]] to get it, and believes that brain-washing and overwriting a person's personality is far more humane a solution than gulags or prison camps. It's slowly made clear that due to his different upbringing, this Superman sees free will as more of a problem than anything else and [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans seeks peace and perfection at the sake of choice]].


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* In ''Fanfic/FireEmblemKeysOfTruth'', both Shigure and Kyo get hit with this early on, causing them to side with Plegia.
* Subverted in ''Fanfic/ArcOfSacrifices''. This is how Lily and Dumbledore seem to view their brainwashing of Harry. To everyone else, it's a case of LightIsNotGood.
* Hinted by ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} in ''Fanfic/HellsisterTrilogy'' when she explains to her adoptive father that Franchise/GreenLantern mind-wipes villains out of being a problem.
* In ''FanFic/ProfessorRiddlesChronicles'', Riddle brainwashes Quirrell's father and Snape's father into being non-abusive parents.


** This is surprisingly common in {{Utopia}}s before science fiction's Golden Age-as in, so before the Golden Age that they also talk positively of the annihilation of all non-"useful" animal life. It's still used straight as late as the middle of Creator/IsaacAsimov's career, although in the short story in question the character advocating the procedure is [[spoiler:secretly a robot, who of course would regard mental reprogramming as no different from the reprogramming done to defective robots.]]

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** This is surprisingly common in {{Utopia}}s before science fiction's Golden Age-as Age--as in, so before the Golden Age that they also talk positively of the annihilation of all non-"useful" animal life. It's still used straight as late as the middle of Creator/IsaacAsimov's career, although in the short story in question the character advocating the procedure is [[spoiler:secretly a robot, who of course would regard mental reprogramming as no different from the reprogramming done to defective robots.]]



* Played with in the ''Literature/RebelForce'' series. A brainwashed Imperial assassin, X-7, has been trying to kill Luke Skywalker, but his continuing failures and time away from his master shakes the brainwashing-not much, but enough that he's bothered by stray emotions and fragments of memory with no context to them. He goes rogue in order to search for his obliterated past-the Rebels, aware of this, decide to set things up to convince him that he's the long-lost brother of one of them, in the hopes of turning him against the Empire. It's much milder than what was done to him in the first place, but still harsh. [[spoiler: And has very mixed results.]] The brother in question comes to believe that X-7 used to be his brother, then doubts it again[[spoiler:-and the books themselves never quite confirm or deny it.]]
** In the next book Luke Skywalker pulls off a much kinder example [[spoiler: on a base full of people who'd undergone similar brainwashing. He uses a desperate wide-scale JediMindTrick to ''undo'' the Imperial brainwashing, leaving it a base full of people who were confused and didn't know who or where they were-he couldn't restore the memories that had been lost-but didn't think and act as appendages of the BigBad anymore.]]
* In ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' at the end, Winston Smith "loves Big Brother." The reader sees it as a DownerEnding where TheBadGuyWins, but Smith himself views the change as HeelFaceBrainwashing. It's stated this doesn't save them, however-the state still kills all dissidents, but only after they're brainwashed to confess everything.

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* Played with in the ''Literature/RebelForce'' series. A brainwashed Imperial assassin, X-7, has been trying to kill Luke Skywalker, but his continuing failures and time away from his master shakes the brainwashing-not brainwashing--not much, but enough that he's bothered by stray emotions and fragments of memory with no context to them. He goes rogue in order to search for his obliterated past-the past--the Rebels, aware of this, decide to set things up to convince him that he's the long-lost brother of one of them, in the hopes of turning him against the Empire. It's much milder than what was done to him in the first place, but still harsh. [[spoiler: And has very mixed results.]] The brother in question comes to believe that X-7 used to be his brother, then doubts it again[[spoiler:-and the books themselves never quite confirm or deny it.]]
** In the next book Luke Skywalker pulls off a much kinder example [[spoiler: on a base full of people who'd undergone similar brainwashing. He uses a desperate wide-scale JediMindTrick to ''undo'' the Imperial brainwashing, leaving it a base full of people who were confused and didn't know who or where they were-he were--he couldn't restore the memories that had been lost-but lost--but didn't think and act as appendages of the BigBad anymore.]]
* In ''Literature/NineteenEightyFour'' at the end, Winston Smith "loves Big Brother." The reader sees it as a DownerEnding where TheBadGuyWins, but Smith himself views the change as HeelFaceBrainwashing. It's stated this doesn't save them, however-the however--the state still kills all dissidents, but only after they're brainwashed to confess everything.



* Literature/MollyMoon repeatedly uses her hypnotic powers to turn her nasty antagonists into good guys -- though in a more roundabout way than most examples of the trope; she can't re-write someone's personality and for the most part the series is pretty consistent about hypnotic influences wearing off after a while, so Molly's main method is to imprent the villains with a GoodFeelsGood sensation and hoping they'll remember and stick with this.

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* Literature/MollyMoon repeatedly uses her hypnotic powers to turn her nasty antagonists into good guys -- though in a more roundabout way than most examples of the trope; she can't re-write someone's personality and for the most part the series is pretty consistent about hypnotic influences wearing off after a while, so Molly's main method is to imprent imprint the villains with a GoodFeelsGood sensation and hoping they'll remember and stick with this.



** Refreshingly, this particular case is treated as a monumentally stupid decision on the part of the Atlantis expedition, and recurring villain Micheal (the original test subject) repeatedly [[WhatTheHellHero calls them out]] on the immorality of the action. Also, Michael had offered to become their ally again of his own free will (after having been rejected as being tainted by his own hive), so long as they didn't subject him to the virus again. They subjected him to the virus anyway, and this [[CreateYourOwnVillain turned him into one of their most persistent and dangerous enemies]].

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** Refreshingly, this particular case is treated as a monumentally stupid decision on the part of the Atlantis expedition, and recurring villain Micheal Michael (the original test subject) repeatedly [[WhatTheHellHero calls them out]] on the immorality of the action. Also, Michael had offered to become their ally again of his own free will (after having been rejected as being tainted by his own hive), so long as they didn't subject him to the virus again. They subjected him to the virus anyway, and this [[CreateYourOwnVillain turned him into one of their most persistent and dangerous enemies]].



* Angel, from ''Series/{{Angel}}'', would seem to qualify for this: the most evil vampire in history, he was given a soul by Gypsies against his will, and spent the rest of his life atoning for the horrible deeds he'd done. Except when he went evil again, and then, you guessed it, RoaringRampageOfRevenge (OmnicidalManiac, even). The difference, of course, being that the Gypsies weren't the good guys-they did it as the worst ''punishment'' they could think of, after he killed one of them.

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* Angel, from ''Series/{{Angel}}'', would seem to qualify for this: the most evil vampire in history, he was given a soul by Gypsies against his will, and spent the rest of his life atoning for the horrible deeds he'd done. Except when he went evil again, and then, you guessed it, RoaringRampageOfRevenge (OmnicidalManiac, even). The difference, of course, being that the Gypsies weren't the good guys-they guys--they did it as the worst ''punishment'' they could think of, after he killed one of them.



** ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'''s Season 4 gives us [[spoiler: Spike's chip]] which is very much like ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' in that it doesn't change the personality, it just makes it impossible for him to hurt humans. This leads him to do a HeelFaceTurn not out of any heroic tendencies but because he discovers the chip still lets him hurt demons, and his innately violent personality leaves hin always wanting to hurt ''something''. [[spoiler: And then later in the series, he actually does get his soul back. [[GoodIsNotNice This does not necessarily make him a nice guy]], though.]]

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** ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'''s Season 4 gives us [[spoiler: Spike's chip]] which is very much like ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' in that it doesn't change the personality, it just makes it impossible for him to hurt humans. This leads him to do a HeelFaceTurn not out of any heroic tendencies but because he discovers the chip still lets him hurt demons, and his innately violent personality leaves hin him always wanting to hurt ''something''. [[spoiler: And then later in the series, he actually does get his soul back. [[GoodIsNotNice This does not necessarily make him a nice guy]], though.]]



** The MO of the Phantom Thieves of Hearts in ''VideoGame/Persona5''. They target corrupt adults who are beyond the law due to their positions, entering the mental worlds created by their "warped desires" and fighting monstrous manifestations of their corruption (each based on one of the SevenDeadlySins), literally "stealing" the corruption in their hearts. This results in the target having a sudden change of heart that causes them to openly confess and take responsibility for their crimes, such as the BigBrotherBully in the [[Anime/Persona5TheDayBreakers prequel OVA]]: He ends up in tears, repeatedly apologising to his brother, before immediately turning himself in and telling the police where to find evidence incriminating him. Several characters in-game do point out that this feels very much like ProtagonistCenteredMorality, yet at the same time, conventional methods just won't work and doing nothing means the vile acts continue unopposed; it's essentially the lesser of two evils.

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** The MO of the Phantom Thieves of Hearts in ''VideoGame/Persona5''. They target corrupt adults who are beyond the law due to their positions, entering the mental worlds created by their "warped desires" and fighting monstrous manifestations of their corruption (each based on one of the SevenDeadlySins), literally "stealing" the corruption in their hearts. This results in the target having a sudden change of heart that causes them to openly confess and take responsibility for their crimes, such as the BigBrotherBully in the [[Anime/Persona5TheDayBreakers prequel OVA]]: ''Anime/Persona5TheDayBreakers'': He ends up in tears, repeatedly apologising to his brother, before immediately turning himself in and telling the police where to find evidence incriminating him. Several characters in-game do point out that this feels very much like ProtagonistCenteredMorality, yet at the same time, conventional methods just won't work and doing nothing means the vile acts continue unopposed; it's essentially the lesser of two evils.



* In ''VideoGame/MegamanBattleNetwork5'', the BigBad is almost convinced to give up on his evil ways, but he decides against it because he believes [[IveComeTooFar he's gone too far]] to be redeemed. [[spoiler:Cue [[EvenEvilHasStandards Dr. Wily]] of all people using the Soulnet to erase his memories, forcing Regal to reform.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/MegamanBattleNetwork5'', ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork5TeamColonelAndTeamProtoMan'', the BigBad is almost convinced to give up on his evil ways, but he decides against it because he believes [[IveComeTooFar he's gone too far]] to be redeemed. [[spoiler:Cue [[EvenEvilHasStandards Dr. Wily]] of all people using the Soulnet to erase his memories, forcing Regal to reform.]]



* ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'': [[ClassyCatBurglar Magpie's]] backstory is that she was a repentant thief who volunteered to have this done to her. All of her memories were wiped and she was given a new name, past and personality. While this was successful for a time, she eventually developed a deranged, super-villianous SplitPersonality. The process also somehow [[FeelNoPain removed her ability to feel pain]], which made her significantly more dangerous.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman'': [[ClassyCatBurglar Magpie's]] backstory is that she was a repentant thief who volunteered to have this done to her. All of her memories were wiped and she was given a new name, past and personality. While this was successful for a time, she eventually developed a deranged, super-villianous super-villainous SplitPersonality. The process also somehow [[FeelNoPain removed her ability to feel pain]], which made her significantly more dangerous.



** In an earlier episode, Mabel givse Gruncle Stan magical dentures that make him unable to lie, or even to want to lie. After trying desperately to prevent Stan from confessing to crimes and get arrested, Mabel learns not to force changes on people.

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** In an earlier episode, Mabel givse gives Gruncle Stan magical dentures that make him unable to lie, or even to want to lie. After trying desperately to prevent Stan from confessing to crimes and get arrested, Mabel learns not to force changes on people.


* In ''WebAudio/RefletsDAcide'', it turns out in the last episodes that [[PosthumousCharacter Maender and Alkor]] left behind a huge ThanatosGambit in order to inflic this trope to [[BigBad Belial]], in order to turn him back to his original Archangel form. [[spoiler:It only works for a few seconds before his memory returns, turning him back into a Demon.]]

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* In ''WebAudio/RefletsDAcide'', ''Audioplay/RefletsDAcide'', it turns out in the last episodes that [[PosthumousCharacter Maender and Alkor]] left behind a huge ThanatosGambit in order to inflic this trope to [[BigBad Belial]], in order to turn him back to his original Archangel form. [[spoiler:It only works for a few seconds before his memory returns, turning him back into a Demon.]]

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* Literature/TheWheelOfTime, Graendal (as Hessalam) is under deep compulsion due to an accident while battling Aviendha; she now fawns over Aviendha.


* In episode 11 of the cartoon version of ''WesternAnimation/SpaceAce'', after Kimberly was turned into a baby, Dexter becomes brainwashed by Borf into grabbing Kimberly, so every time Ace turns back into Dexter, the brainwashing process is in effect. However, after turning back into her adult form, Kimberly uses the brainwashing machine to snap Dexter out of his brainwashing state, and destroys the machine using Dexter's gun.

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* In episode 11 of the cartoon version of ''WesternAnimation/SpaceAce'', ''VideoGame/SpaceAce'', after Kimberly was turned into a baby, Dexter becomes brainwashed by Borf into grabbing Kimberly, so every time Ace turns back into Dexter, the brainwashing process is in effect. However, after turning back into her adult form, Kimberly uses the brainwashing machine to snap Dexter out of his brainwashing state, and destroys the machine using Dexter's gun.


** It is heavily implied (but never 'quite' confirmed) that Zedd, Rita, and Divatox had originally been good individuals transformed against their wills into villains, and that this is the reason they were transformed into ordinary folks instead of disintegrated like everyone else.

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** It is heavily implied (but never 'quite' ''quite'' confirmed) that Zedd, Rita, and Divatox had originally been good individuals transformed against their wills into villains, and that this is the reason they were transformed into ordinary folks instead of disintegrated like everyone else.

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** It is heavily implied (but never 'quite' confirmed) that Zedd, Rita, and Divatox had originally been good individuals transformed against their wills into villains, and that this is the reason they were transformed into ordinary folks instead of disintegrated like everyone else.


* ''Manga/FairyTail'' has the superweapon Nirvana, which can deal these out en masse (as well as [[BrainwashedAndCrazy making good guys evil]]). While it's used by the villlains (and a bunch of people spontaneously changing their alignment is recognized as a bad thing), one of the villains is hit by accident, and no one sees the brainwashing as wrong. It helps that it was an accident, the heroes weren't actually involved, and the villain was revealed to be a FallenHero anyway.

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* ''Manga/FairyTail'' has the superweapon Nirvana, which can deal these out en masse (as well as [[BrainwashedAndCrazy making good guys evil]]). While it's used by the villlains villains (and a bunch of people spontaneously changing their alignment is recognized as a bad thing), one of the villains is hit by accident, and no one sees the brainwashing as wrong. It helps that it was an accident, the heroes weren't actually involved, and the villain was revealed to be a FallenHero anyway. [[spoiler:It's revealed, however, that in the past Nirvana was used by the Nirvit to try and force warring nations into peace through such brainwashing, which worked out...until it turned out Nirvana "reflected" the darkness of those nations onto the peaceful Nirvits until they turned on and slaughtered each other.]]


* In ''Wallace and Gromit: WesternAnimation/TheCurseOfTheWereRabbit'', the rabbits aren't necessarily ''evil'', but their voracious eating habits are threatening to ruin Tottington Hall's annual vegetable competition. Wallace prides himself on his "humane" service and refuses to kill the rabbits he catches, but he's also running out of space for their cages, so this trope is his attempt at [[TakeAThirdOption taking a third option]] - "brainwash the bunnies" to get rid of their veg-eating desires. It works, but a mishap during the procedure results in the creation of the titular Were-Rabbit, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero which causes even worse problems than the rabbits were]].



* In ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'': This is tried on Cruella de Vil through hypnosis. It initially works and she starts to lovingly embrace any puppy she sees, but it turns out that a loud clock noise can counteract it. And since this film is set in ''London'', [[StatusQuoIsGod it's only a matter of time]] before good ol' Big Ben turns Cruella back into her evil self again and she goes right back to being CruellaToAnimals.

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* In ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'': This ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'', this is tried on Cruella de Vil through hypnosis. It initially works and she starts to lovingly embrace any puppy she sees, but it turns out that a loud clock noise can counteract it. And since this film is set in ''London'', [[StatusQuoIsGod it's only a matter of time]] before good ol' Big Ben turns Cruella back into her evil self again and she goes right back to being CruellaToAnimals.


** One exception: lycanthropy also changes a character's alignment, and there are good and neutral types of lycanthropes. While, again, the implications of this trope are usually glossed over, this is why in TabletopGame/{{Eberron}} the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the Purge, ''including'' ones who didn't threaten society.

to:

** One exception: lycanthropy also changes a character's alignment, and there are good and neutral types of lycanthropes. While, again, the implications of this trope are usually glossed over, this is part of why in TabletopGame/{{Eberron}} the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the Purge, ''including'' ones who didn't threaten society.


** One exception: lycanthropy also changes a character's alignment, and there are good and neutral types of lycanthropes. While, again, the implications of this trope are usually glossed over, this is why why the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the [[WitchHunt Purge]], ''including'' ones who didn't threaten society.

to:

** One exception: lycanthropy also changes a character's alignment, and there are good and neutral types of lycanthropes. While, again, the implications of this trope are usually glossed over, this is why why in TabletopGame/{{Eberron}} the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the [[WitchHunt Purge]], Purge, ''including'' ones who didn't threaten society.


** One exception: the moral implications of this trope are part of why the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the purge, including ones who were good or neutral in alignment.

to:

** One exception: lycanthropy also changes a character's alignment, and there are good and neutral types of lycanthropes. While, again, the moral implications of this trope are part of usually glossed over, this is why why the Church of the Silver Flame targeted all lycanthropes during the purge, including [[WitchHunt Purge]], ''including'' ones who were good or neutral in alignment.didn't threaten society.

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