Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / HealThyself

Go To



** ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' has a similar system, with each player having a limited supply of "adrenaline syringes" for reviving colleagues. It's thus very tempting in bored moments to [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential take your teammate out yourself]] and play chicken with the death timer...

to:

** ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory'' has a similar system, with each player having a limited supply of "adrenaline syringes" for reviving colleagues. It's thus very tempting in bored moments to [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential take your teammate out yourself]] and play chicken with the death timer...


* The healing items of choice in ''VideoGame/FatalFrame'' are Herbal Medicine and Sacred Water. The former heals part of the playable protagonist's health; the latter heals it fully.

to:

* The healing items of choice in ''VideoGame/FatalFrame'' are [[HealingHerb Herbal Medicine Medicine]] and [[HealingPotion Sacred Water.Water]]. The former heals part of the playable protagonist's health; the latter heals it fully.


* Conversely, ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games feature more mundane healing items, like health drinks, first aid kits, ampoules and the occassional energy drinks to boost stamina. Rather than reflect the character's health through body language, the screen usually grows more distorted the more damage they take.

to:

* Conversely, ''Franchise/SilentHill'' games feature more mundane healing items, like health drinks, first aid kits, ampoules and the occassional occasional energy drinks to boost stamina. Rather than reflect the character's health through body language, the screen usually grows more distorted the more damage they take.



* ''VideoGame/CallOfCthulhuDarkCornersOfTheEarth'' notably averted this to a great extent. First aid kits contain several rolls of gauze, a spool of suture, a splint, and a few doses of antitoxin. Each must be used separately -- with associated animation -- on the appropriate body part for the appropriate injuries. For example, suture converts major wounds (which gradually bleed out your health bar) to minor wounds (which merely prevent you from recovering health). Bandages remove minor wounds, allowing your health to automatically refill over time. Broken limbs decrease movement speed or gun accuracy until repaired with splints. Additionally, movement speed and accuracy are severely impacted by having a low health bar, and when near death the character experiences a grayout as color drains from the scene. Morphine is available to counteract these effects at the cost of severe sanity loss. While not entirely realistic (applying a splint makes a broken arm good as new), it's about [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality as close as one can get]] to a realistic injury system in a FPS where you can't take months off for bones to knit nor leave the injuries in place for the game's duration.

to:

* ''VideoGame/CallOfCthulhuDarkCornersOfTheEarth'' notably averted this to a great extent. First aid kits contain several rolls of gauze, a spool of suture, a splint, and a few doses of antitoxin. Each must be used separately -- with associated animation -- on the appropriate body part for the appropriate injuries. For example, suture converts major wounds (which gradually bleed out your health bar) to minor wounds (which merely prevent you from recovering health). Bandages remove minor wounds, allowing your health to automatically refill over time. Broken limbs decrease movement speed or gun accuracy until repaired with splints. Additionally, movement speed and accuracy are severely impacted by having a low health bar, and when near death the character experiences a grayout gray-out as color drains from the scene. Morphine is available to counteract these effects at the cost of severe sanity loss. While not entirely realistic (applying a splint makes a broken arm good as new), it's about [[AcceptableBreaksFromReality as close as one can get]] to a realistic injury system in a FPS where you can't take months off for bones to knit nor leave the injuries in place for the game's duration.


Added DiffLines:

* The healing items of choice in ''VideoGame/FatalFrame'' are Herbal Medicine and Sacred Water. The former heals part of the playable protagonist's health; the latter heals it fully.


* Similar to the ''LordOfTheRings'' topic above, in ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' there are various skills that only kick in when a character's health hits the red. The most common is "Prevail", which raises a character's hit and dodge rates.

to:

* Similar to the ''LordOfTheRings'' topic above, in In ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' there are various skills that only kick in when a character's health hits the red. The most common is "Prevail", which raises a character's hit and dodge rates.


* The LifeMeter-enabled ''Franchise/SlyCooper'' games had not normal white boxes with the red plus sign, but actual red crosses that scattered around, spinning on the lower leg. Not sure if that'd run afoul of the Red Cross trademark or not.

to:

* The LifeMeter-enabled ''Franchise/SlyCooper'' ''VideoGame/SlyCooper'' games had not normal white boxes with the red plus sign, but actual red crosses that scattered around, spinning on the lower leg. Not sure if that'd run afoul of the Red Cross trademark or not.


* Gordon Freeman in ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' gains back lost health by plugging his hazard suit into health and energy recharging stations scattered around the levels. The suit has a strongly implied but never fully explained ability to protect him by sacrificing some of its energy in response to almost any hazard from extreme temperatures to submachine gun rounds. Sometimes, its mechanical voice mentions that it's dispensing morphine or detecting a major blood loss, but it's all just a {{Handwave}} in the end. Freeman, like most video game and TV heroes, is MadeOfIron.

to:

* Gordon Freeman in ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' gains back lost health by plugging his hazard suit into health and energy recharging stations scattered around the levels. The suit has a strongly implied but never fully explained ability is designed to use energy to protect him by sacrificing some of its energy from hazards, such as hardening the armor plating in response to almost any hazard from extreme temperatures to submachine gun rounds. Sometimes, its mechanical voice mentions that it's dispensing gunfire, but regardless of the energy level, the suit can dispense morphine or detecting a major blood loss, but it's apply some kind of basic first aid in response to injuries. This is all just a {{Handwave}} in the end. end, though: Freeman, like most video game and TV heroes, is MadeOfIron.


** Depending on your point of view, this is justified or handwaved by the mention that Nanoaug agents are equipped to metabolize med kits for quicker use.

to:

** Depending on your point of view, this is justified or handwaved by the mention that Nanoaug the nanomachines in augmented agents are equipped designed to metabolize med kits promote incredibly fast healing, by metabolizing food and medical supplies quickly for quicker use.rapid health regeneration. Or, in the case of booze, squashing the effects of strong alcohol consumption into the space of a few seconds.


* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', bandages heal everything. Ripped tendons, cracked skulls... ''everything.'' And apparently, [[YouFailYourMedicalBoardsForever silk bandages help more than linen ones.]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', bandages heal everything. Ripped tendons, cracked skulls... ''everything.'' And apparently, [[YouFailYourMedicalBoardsForever [[ArtisticLicenseMedicine silk bandages help more than linen ones.]]


* The healing ability every battleship and high tier cruisers get in [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarships.]] Technically its called "damage repair" but everyone, even the developers, calls it healing for sort and to distinguish it from the DamageControl ability, which gets rid of status effects. The Captain Bad Advice videos (pictured above) have fun with this, treating it like literal healing, complete with band aid and splints.

to:

* The healing ability every battleship and high tier cruisers get in [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarships.]] VideoGame/WorldOfWarships. Technically its called "damage repair" but everyone, even the developers, calls it healing for sort and to distinguish it from the DamageControl ability, which gets rid of status effects. The Captain Bad Advice videos (pictured above) have fun with this, treating it like literal healing, complete with band aid and splints.


* The healing ability every battleship and high tier cruisers get in world of warships. Technically its called "damage repair" but everyone, even the developers, calls it healing for sort and to distinguish it from the DamageControl ability, which gets rid of status effects. The Captain Bad Advice videos (pictured above) have fun with this, treating it like literal healing, complete with band aid and splints.

to:

* The healing ability every battleship and high tier cruisers get in world of warships. [[VideoGame/WorldOfWarships.]] Technically its called "damage repair" but everyone, even the developers, calls it healing for sort and to distinguish it from the DamageControl ability, which gets rid of status effects. The Captain Bad Advice videos (pictured above) have fun with this, treating it like literal healing, complete with band aid and splints.

Added DiffLines:

* The healing ability every battleship and high tier cruisers get in world of warships. Technically its called "damage repair" but everyone, even the developers, calls it healing for sort and to distinguish it from the DamageControl ability, which gets rid of status effects. The Captain Bad Advice videos (pictured above) have fun with this, treating it like literal healing, complete with band aid and splints.


[[quoteright:500:[[VideoGame/WorldOfWarsips https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wows_45.png]]]]

to:

[[quoteright:500:[[VideoGame/WorldOfWarsips [[quoteright:500:[[VideoGame/WorldOfWarships https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wows_45.png]]]]

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:500:[[VideoGame/WorldOfWarsips https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/wows_45.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:500:[[PointlessBandaid Why does a battleship need a band aid?]]]]


* Generally speaking, in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series, healing is primarily achieved through a HyperactiveMetabolism - namely, eating rations or other food. For ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', it adds a touch of realism by having your rations freeze if you stay in cold areas for too long, rendering them inedible until they thaw out; the only way to prevent frozen rations or to thaw them out requires you to equip the rations, which is implied that you're holding them to your body so your body heat would melt the ice.

to:

* Generally speaking, in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' ''VideoGame/MetalGear'' series, healing is primarily achieved through a HyperactiveMetabolism - namely, eating rations or other food. For ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', it adds a touch of realism by having your rations freeze if you stay in cold areas for too long, rendering them inedible until they thaw out; the only way to prevent frozen rations or to thaw them out requires you to equip the rations, which is implied that you're holding them to your body so your body heat would melt the ice.


[[folder:Fight Game]]
* In ''VideoGame/SonicBattle'', Sonic has an ability called "Sonic Heal" that works by applying his own SuperSpeed to his body to rapidly heal his wounds.
[[/folder]]



* In ''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt'', both Gunvolt and Copen can use healing skills on themselves. With Copen, it's just the tech in his suit working to repair his injuries. For Gunvolt, it's explained as his [[ShockAndAwe lightning powers]] stimulating his body's natural healing processes.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/AzureStrikerGunvolt'', both Gunvolt and Copen can use healing skills on themselves.themselves in addition to finding health pickups from either killing certain enemies to just lying around. With Copen, it's just the tech in his suit working to repair his injuries. For Gunvolt, it's explained as his [[ShockAndAwe lightning powers]] stimulating his body's natural healing processes.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 112

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report