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*** Bizarrely, in some parts of the American South up to the mid-20th century, "cock" was the common vulgar term for the vagina, which naturally led to some hilarious mix-ups when Southern males mingled with people from other parts of the country.


** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (these parties still exist in the upper class but they're more focused on the women's charity work than their marriageability). Though technically, that was simply a translation of the term "debutante". However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.

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** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT.LGBT+. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out "coming-out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (these ladies[[note]]These parties still exist in the upper class class, but they're more focused on the young women's charity work than their marriageability). Though technically, that was simply a translation of the term "debutante". marriageability[[/note]]. However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend go to college after high school and pursue careers after high school rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.



* "Making love" used to connote romance or courting before it became a more genteel phrase for sexual intercourse, though most people still reserve "making love" for sex within a relationship as opposed to a more casual encounter.

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* "Making love" used to connote romance or courting before it became a more genteel phrase for sexual intercourse, though most people still reserve "making love" for sex within a relationship as opposed to a more casual encounter.hook-up.



** "Bitch" originally referred to female dogs that give birth to young puppies, but is now almost exclusively used as a vulgar insult, fairly often with sexist and gendered connotations--[[AppropriatedAppellation and as such is occasionally reclaimed by feminist organizations]] [[NWordPrivileges as a term of endearment]]. A VocalMinority of dog breeders still swear by the term in its original context (the term now most often used in its stead is "dam", which makes things even funnier), and it is sometimes used among veterinary personnel to refer specifically to an intact (i.e. unspayed) female dog (as this status can be important for certain medical purposes). The term is still used in dog shows, causing some amusement to some people watching.

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** "Bitch" originally referred to female dogs that give birth to young puppies, but is now almost exclusively used as a vulgar insult, fairly often with sexist and gendered connotations--[[AppropriatedAppellation and as such is occasionally reclaimed by feminist organizations]] [[NWordPrivileges as a term of endearment]]. A VocalMinority of dog breeders still swear by the term in its original context (the term now most often used in its stead is "dam", which makes things even funnier), "dam" despite ''also'' being a swear), and it is sometimes used among veterinary personnel to refer specifically to an intact (i.e. unspayed) unspayed female dog (as dog, as this status can be is important for certain medical purposes). purposes. The term is still used in dog shows, causing some amusement to some people watching.



** A "cougar" originally referred exclusively to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cougar a species of wildcat]], but now can also mean [[MrsRobinson an older woman who dates younger men]]. "Puma," another name for the same cat, has become a somewhat less common term for a younger cougar (like, in her thirties, whereas a full-fledged cougar is at least forty). The wildcat species [[IHaveManyNames has a number of other names]], including "mountain lion" and "catamount," but none of those have alternate slang meanings.



* "Mistress" was originally just the feminine form of "master". Though the words weren't exactly equivalent in meaning. Also a "mistress" could refer to a married man's female paramour. It's occasionally still used in that sense, but nowadays most often refers to a female participant in an affair or a woman who's dominant in BDSM.

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* "Mistress" was originally just the feminine form of "master". Though "master," though the words weren't exactly equivalent in meaning. Also a "mistress" could refer to a married man's female paramour. It's occasionally still used in that sense, but nowadays most often refers to a female participant in an affair or a woman who's dominant in BDSM.



* "Sanctimonious" once meant "holy, devout, possessing sanctity"; nowadays, this meaning is forgotten, as people use "sanctimonious" to refer to feigned, pretentious, holier-than-thou, Pharisaic or Puritanical religious hypocrisy.

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* "Sanctimonious" once meant "holy, devout, possessing sanctity"; nowadays, this meaning is forgotten, as people use "sanctimonious" it nowadays to refer to feigned, pretentious, holier-than-thou, Pharisaic or Puritanical religious hypocrisy.forced, insincere displays of moral superiority, synonymous with "self-righteous" and "holier-than-thou."



* On a similar note "terrible" itself didn't always mean "really bad", but something more like "fearsome". Still a pretty negative meaning, but calling someone terrible wasn't necessarily an insult (hence Ivan The Terrible having it as his title.)

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* On a similar note "terrible" itself didn't always mean "really bad", but something more like "fearsome". Still a pretty negative meaning, but calling someone terrible wasn't necessarily an insult (hence Ivan The Terrible having it as his title.title, or the ComicBook/TeenTitans villain Trigon The Terrible.)


*** "Gay" even saw use as a girl's name up until the 60's or so. It was never too common, but more than one woman was named "Gay" and lived long enough for "I'm Gay" to take a totally different meaning.
** "Queer" originally meant "strange or odd" and later came to refer to homosexuals, sometimes pejoratively and sometimes not. (Lately, this has been fluctuating as the cultural context shifts.) Nowadays, virtually no one uses the original meaning, and "Queer" has largely become an umbrella term for LGBT+, though some older people in the community disagree with using it that way, as they remember when it was a slur.

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*** "Gay" even saw use as a girl's name up until the 60's or so. It was never too common, but more than one woman was named "Gay" and lived long enough for "I'm Gay" to take a totally different meaning.
meaning. It is also a reasonably common surname of French origin. Sometimes people change the spelling to "Gey" in order to avoid confusion--though others revel in it.
** "Queer" originally meant "strange or odd" and later came to refer to homosexuals, sometimes pejoratively and sometimes not. (Lately, this has been fluctuating as the cultural context shifts.) Nowadays, virtually no one uses the original meaning, and Nowadays "Queer" has largely become an umbrella term for LGBT+, though some older people in the community disagree with using it that way, as they remember when it was a slur.



*** Actually, it retains it's original meaning of "strange" dialectically in many parts of the United States (New England for example). This can lead to [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage funny conversations]] with city slickers and British visitors.



** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (these parties still exist in the upper class but they're more focused on the women's charity work than their marriageability). However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.

to:

** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (these parties still exist in the upper class but they're more focused on the women's charity work than their marriageability). Though technically, that was simply a translation of the term "debutante". However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.



** ''"Homo"'' can mean one of two things: either the Greek prefix ''homo-'', meaning "the same" (for example, "homogeneous" basically means "the same throughout"); or the Latin "Homo", which can mean either a human being or the human species (this is where our species name, ''Homo sapiens'', lit. "Thinking man," comes from). Since the nineties, however, homo on its own has come to be a shortening of "homosexual", which leads to many snickers in introductory biology classes where the instructor explains that [[EveryoneIsGay every person in the room]] [[DoubleEntendre is technically]] a ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo Homo]]'', or is descended from the unfortunately named species ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_erectus Homo erectus]]'' (which contains another example on this list).

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** ''"Homo"'' can mean one of two things: either the Greek prefix ''homo-'', meaning "the same" (for example, "homogeneous" basically means "the same throughout"); or the Latin "Homo", which can mean either a human being or the human species (this is where our species name, ''Homo sapiens'', lit. "Thinking man," comes from). Since the nineties, however, homo on its own has come to be a shortening of "homosexual", which leads to many snickers in introductory biology classes where the instructor explains that [[EveryoneIsGay every person in the room]] [[DoubleEntendre is technically]] a ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo Homo]]'', or is descended from the unfortunately named species ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_erectus Homo erectus]]'' (which contains another example on this list). Though the last example is inherently funny anyway.



* "Molest" used to mean "harass" or "annoy", without the more specific modern connotation of sexual assault. One can still go about something "unmolested", however.
* "Grope" used to mean just "touch", but it has connotations of creepy sexual touching nowadays. You can still "grope around" in the dark to find your way, but this trope can slip in if more than one person is there.
* "Tramp" used to refer to bums, hobos, vagrants, drifters, or vagabonds (hence, for example, ''Disney/LadyAndTheTramp''). Today, its most common usage is as a derogatory term for promiscuous women and is synonymous with equally derogatory terms such as "slut", "harlot" or "whore".
** Similarly, "bum" in UsefulNotes/BritishEnglish. Apart from an archaic meaning of "bailiff" (used in one Creator/AgathaChristie story), until fairly recently it only had the "buttocks" meaning in Britain. EaglelandOsmosis means that the "tramp" meaning is now recognized as well. Conversely, the older meaning of "tramp" is still dominant in the UK.

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* "Molest" used to mean "harass" or "annoy", without the more specific modern connotation of sexual assault. One can still go about something "unmolested", however.
however. In the US, the old meaning is actually coming back thanks to influence from Latin American Spanish "molestá". While "molest" used to refer only to rape or severe sexual assault, it can now be used of situations that aren't explicitly sexual. Though it usually invokes some sort of comparison to sexual assault such as "I feel [[MindRape molested]] by this horror story" or "he claims he was [[AnalProbing molested]]by aliens".
* "Grope" used to mean just "touch", but it has connotations of creepy sexual touching nowadays. You can still "grope around" in the dark to find your way, but this trope can slip in if more than one person is there.
there. Of if you happen to touch a vaguely humanoid object.
* "Tramp" used to refer to bums, hobos, vagrants, drifters, or vagabonds (hence, for example, ''Disney/LadyAndTheTramp''). Today, its most common usage is as a derogatory term for promiscuous women and is synonymous with equally derogatory terms such as "slut", "harlot" or "whore".
"whore". Hence "tramp stamp", on the logic that if such a tattoo is visible to the general public the bearer is a tramp.
** Similarly, "bum" in UsefulNotes/BritishEnglish. Apart from an archaic meaning of "bailiff" (used in one Creator/AgathaChristie story), until fairly recently it only had the "buttocks" meaning in Britain.meaning. EaglelandOsmosis means that the "tramp" meaning is now recognized as well. Conversely, the older meaning of "tramp" is still dominant in the UK.



* And speaking of "erect", its original definition was "upright and straight", like a soldier at attention. It was also a verb meaning "to build". Thus, a building was sometimes referred to as an "erection".

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* And speaking of "erect", its original definition was "upright and straight", like a soldier at attention. It was also a verb meaning "to build". Thus, a building was sometimes referred to as an "erection"."an erection". The verb "to erect" and the adjective "erect" are still often used in their original meanings. However the adjectival noun "erection" is exclusively dirty now.



** Similarly, the words "retarded" and "retard" originally meant "slowed" and "to slow" respectively, and were often used as shorthand for a person with mental retardation. Nowadays, the terms are used as insults denoting a person who is exceptionally stupid. There's also a [[https://www.musictheory.net/lessons/53 third use of "retardation" in music theory]], referring to when one note of a chord is kept late through a ChordProgression and then steps up.

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** Similarly, the words "retarded" and "retard" originally meant "slowed" and "to slow" respectively, and were often used as shorthand for a person with mental retardation. Nowadays, the terms are used as insults denoting a person who is exceptionally stupid. There's also a [[https://www.musictheory.net/lessons/53 third use of "retardation" in music theory]], referring to when one note of a chord is kept late through a ChordProgression and then steps up. Musicians these days either pronounce the word "retard" with an emphasis on the second syllable (to avoid calling their fellows stupid) or use the Italian "ritardando".



* Whenever we hear the word "sinister", we usually think of it as a synonym for evil. In olden times, however, the word "sinister" originally referred to the left side of something, such as the left hand, [[ASinisterClue with a number of superstitious people regarding southpaws as unlucky or cursed]]. In heraldry, when someone's coat of arms started off in the upper left hand corner (from the arms bearer's perspective, not the viewer's), a stripe or sash that started on the left hand shoulder would have people think that their birth was illegitimate. The older meaning of "sinister" is not entirely lost, since opthamologists and optometrists will use the abbreviation "O.S." for "oculus sinister", which simply means the left eye.

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* Whenever we hear the word "sinister", we usually think of it as a synonym for evil. In olden times, however, the word "sinister" originally referred to the left side of something, such as the left hand, [[ASinisterClue with a number of superstitious people regarding southpaws as unlucky or cursed]]. In heraldry, when someone's coat of arms started off in the upper left hand corner (from the arms bearer's perspective, not the viewer's), a stripe or sash that started on the left hand shoulder would have people think that their birth was illegitimate. The older meaning of "sinister" is not entirely lost, since opthamologists and optometrists will use the abbreviation "O.S." for "oculus sinister", which simply means the left eye. Actually, it pretty much always had this meaning: as the Romans regarded the left side as extremely unlucky, the word "sinister" in Latin meant both "the left" and "suspicious, unlucky".



* "Mistress" was originally just the feminine form of "master". It's occasionally still used in that sense, but nowadays most often refers to a female participant in an affair or a woman who's dominant in BDSM.

to:

* "Mistress" was originally just the feminine form of "master". Though the words weren't exactly equivalent in meaning. Also a "mistress" could refer to a married man's female paramour. It's occasionally still used in that sense, but nowadays most often refers to a female participant in an affair or a woman who's dominant in BDSM.




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* "Boomer" once meant something that was large and/or notable, or, more uncommonly, it could be a name given to boys. It was then used to refer to the Baby Boomer generation. Nowadays, it's commonly used as an insult against elderly and/or out-of-touch people.


* Paragraph 96 of the Constitution of Norway used to include the sentence, "Pinligt Forhør maa ikke finde Sted". This says that interrogations can't be "pinlig", which means that the interrogators can't pressure you to confess. However, the modern meaning of "pinlig" is "embarrassing", so it sounds like a ban on embarrassing interrogations. The was finally changed when the Constitution was modernized in 2014: Paragraph 96 now says something else, and the prohibition on stuff like torture was moved to paragraph 93 (after some rewording to get rid of "pinlig").

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* Paragraph 96 of the Constitution of Norway used to include the sentence, "Pinligt Forhør maa ikke finde Sted". This says that interrogations can't be "pinlig", which means that the interrogators can't pressure you to confess. However, the modern meaning of "pinlig" is "embarrassing", so it sounds like a ban on embarrassing interrogations. The This was finally changed when the Constitution was modernized in 2014: Paragraph 96 now says something else, and the prohibition on stuff like torture was moved to paragraph 93 (after some rewording to get rid (and, of course, no longer includes the word "pinlig").

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* Paragraph 96 of the Constitution of Norway used to include the sentence, "Pinligt Forhør maa ikke finde Sted". This says that interrogations can't be "pinlig", which means that the interrogators can't pressure you to confess. However, the modern meaning of "pinlig" is "embarrassing", so it sounds like a ban on embarrassing interrogations. The was finally changed when the Constitution was modernized in 2014: Paragraph 96 now says something else, and the prohibition on stuff like torture was moved to paragraph 93 (after some rewording to get rid of "pinlig").


** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (the closest thing we have in modern times would be Sweet Sixteen parties). However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.

to:

** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies (the closest thing we have (these parties still exist in modern times would be Sweet Sixteen parties).the upper class but they're more focused on the women's charity work than their marriageability). However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.

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* "Tyrant" originally meant an unelected ruler, typically over a city-state, and was a neutral term. Granted, most tyrants ''were'' pretty nasty, which undoubtedly led to it's current meaning. That said, there were a few tyrants who were [[TheGoodKing much beloved by their people.]]


-->" 'The Bouncer' is merely the English 'chucker out'. When liberty verges on license and gaiety on wanton delirium, the Bouncer selects the gayest of the gay, and--bounces him!"

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-->" 'The -->"'The Bouncer' is merely the English 'chucker out'. When liberty verges on license and gaiety on wanton delirium, the Bouncer selects the gayest of the gay, and--bounces him!"


* "Outrage" refers to "provoking anger" or "insulting", but during the Victorian era it used to be an euphemistic term for physical assault or even ''rape''.


A cross between AccidentalInnuendo and UnusualEuphemism. This trope occurs when "language drift"--natural changes in the common vocabulary--causes a word or phrase originally intended as wholly innocuous to be potentially taken as startling, confusing or just plain funny in a different time or place. Usually relates to sexual euphemisms, but can also involve other sensitive concepts. Political correctness sometimes comes into play.

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A cross between AccidentalInnuendo and UnusualEuphemism. This trope occurs when "language drift"--natural changes in the common vocabulary--causes a word or phrase originally intended as wholly innocuous to be potentially taken as startling, confusing or just plain funny in a different time or place. Usually relates to sexual euphemisms, but can also involve other sensitive concepts. Political correctness sometimes comes into play.
concepts.

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''NOTE: Please only list words or phrases that are '''way''' more commonly used with its vulgar definition than its original innocent definition that was commonly used back in the past. Clean words or phrases that happen to have dirty slang meanings simply aren't enough. (Also, this list is meant for common words or phrases. If you have one that's more specific or less known, it's better off in the "Other" folder.''


* "Eat out", in addition to meaning "go to a restaurant" (which it is still used to mean) used to mean, when applied to a person, to give them a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech basically. Nowadays "eat out" as a transitive verb usually means "to give a girl oral sex". Fortunately we still have the idiom "chew out" to mean what "eat out" originally meant (to harshly criticize.)


** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies. However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.

to:

** "Coming out" is now short for "coming out of the closet," which is when someone publicly reveals that they're LGBT. The term "coming out" used to refer to young women of upper class families graduating from finishing school, where they learned social etiquette, and could now be married and otherwise viewed as adult women. The occasion was celebrated with a "coming out party", which was a formal ball where the graduating class was presented as proper ladies.ladies (the closest thing we have in modern times would be Sweet Sixteen parties). However, finishing schools became obsolete in the 1960's as it became more acceptable for women to attend college after high school and pursue careers rather than husbands. As a result, using "come out" in this manner has been forgotten in modern times.


* "Creator/{{Netflix}} and chill" was originally used literally, to innocently watch and enjoy the streaming service. It was only until later the phrase was used as a sexual euphemism.

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