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* In the ''Literature/BattleTechExpandedUniverse'' novel ''Star Lord'' ([[NamesTheSame no, not]] [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy that one]]), Duncan Kalma and Sir Trane end up having to hotwire a [[HumongousMecha BattleMech]] in order to stop a raid. As one might expect, 'Mechs are usually secured with all manner of safeguads to prevent them from being stolen, but the pair manage to shanghai a ''Warhammer'' with very little trouble. Trane doesn't believe it could be that easy since modern technology makes grand theft Battlemech almost impossible, but Duncan explains that he realizes that this is a much older model, one old enough to be tricked by the simple combination of a strong magnet on the security computer and forcing all the important moving-and-shooting protocols to start and therefore take all the priority runtime before the anti-theft safeguards can kick in.

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* In the ''Literature/BattleTechExpandedUniverse'' ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'' [[Franchise/BattleTechExpandedUniverse Expanded Universe]] novel ''Star Lord'' ([[NamesTheSame no, not]] [[Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy that one]]), Duncan Kalma and Sir Trane end up having to hotwire a [[HumongousMecha BattleMech]] in order to stop a raid. As one might expect, 'Mechs are usually secured with all manner of safeguads to prevent them from being stolen, but the pair manage to shanghai a ''Warhammer'' with very little trouble. Trane doesn't believe it could be that easy since modern technology makes grand theft Battlemech almost impossible, but Duncan explains that he realizes that this is a much older model, one old enough to be tricked by the simple combination of a strong magnet on the security computer and forcing all the important moving-and-shooting protocols to start and therefore take all the priority runtime before the anti-theft safeguards can kick in.

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* ''Series/TheBill''. The Sun Hill detectives are tracking a gang of professional car thieves, and watch in disbelief as they lift up the hood and instantly deactivate the car alarm, then hotwire the car.


** Kyle Reese easily hotwires a car in the first film as well.

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** Kyle Reese easily hotwires a car in the first film as well. Presumably he learned these skills in his post-apocalyptic ScavengerWorld.


** Arnold's Terminator never ''hotwires'' anything, he does one better. He smashes and rips away the steering column cover, along with the lock cylinder, and then turns the ignition lock shaft with his fingers, which was clearly shown in the [[Film/TheTerminator first film]], and then repeated again in the [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay second]]. Incidentally, due to it's strength the whole process literally takes it 5 seconds, about as fast as most people take to start a car with a key.
** Kyle Reese hotwires a car in the first film as well.

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** Arnold's Terminator never ''hotwires'' anything, he does one better. He smashes and rips away the steering column cover, along with the lock cylinder, and then turns the ignition lock shaft with his fingers, which was clearly shown in the [[Film/TheTerminator first film]], and then repeated again in the [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay second]]. Incidentally, due to it's its strength the whole process literally takes it 5 seconds, about as fast as most people take to start a car with a key.
** Kyle Reese easily hotwires a car in the first film as well.


[[folder: Videogames ]]

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[[folder: Videogames Video Games ]]



* Some vehicles can be started by exploiting an engineering flaw. One such case is the Vauxhall Nova, which is done by removing the emergency light button, re-inserting it upside-down, and pressing it the start the ignition. This is demonstrated on Top Gear [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNdygguAMQA here]].

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* Some vehicles can be started by exploiting an engineering flaw. One such case is the Vauxhall Nova, which is done by removing the emergency light button, re-inserting it upside-down, and pressing it the to start the ignition. This is demonstrated on Top Gear [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNdygguAMQA here]].

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* ''Literature/CircleOfThree'': {{Discussed|Trope}} and {{Subverted|Trope}} when one character gripes that, just because she grew up in an OrphansOrdeal getting bounced between foster care and fending for herself, people expect her to know how to hotwire a car and {{MacGyver|ing}} a bomb out of NoodleImplements. In both cases, she cannot.


This may well be on the way to being a DiscreditedTrope, as more and more cars either incorporate a necessary processor into the key itself, or require the key fob to be present before they'll start.

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This may well be on the way to being a DiscreditedTrope, as more and more cars either incorporate a necessary processor into the key itself, or require the key fob to be present before they'll start.
start, or incorporate a necessary processor into the key itself.


* Implied in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', as stationary cars can be stolen and start up just as fast as ones taken while running. In the fourth installment, the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission; the process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster. The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. * In ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'', Edward can get in to any car around Central Park, pull a few wires out and there's a little minigame for you to get the right pair together. Can be slightly difficult when you've got a few enemies bearing down on you though.

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* Implied in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', as stationary cars can be stolen and start up just as fast as ones taken while running. In the fourth installment, the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission; the process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster. The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car.
* In ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'', Edward can get in to any car around Central Park, pull a few wires out and there's a little minigame for you to get the right pair together. Can be slightly difficult when you've got a few enemies bearing down on you though.

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* ''Film/{{Wanda}}'': Mr. Dennis finds an unlocked car and quickly hotwires it to start. Wanda, who gets in the passenger seat, then plucks the keys that were hanging off the sun visor and says "Why didn't you use these?"

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* Averted in ''Film/VincentWantsToSea'': when Dr. Rose loses her car keys, Vincent's father has to hotwire her car and break the steering lock, which takes some time. This later causes them trouble when they get pulled over in Italy - the officer is understandably reluctant to believe they didn't steal the car, especially since Dr. Rose doesn't have ID with her.


* Implied in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', as stationary cars can be stolen and start up just as fast as ones taken while running. In the fourth installment, the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission. The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. Still, the trope is played straight. In ''IV'', the hotwiring process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster.
* In ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'', Edward can get in to any car around Central Park, pull a few wires out and there's a little minigame for you to get the right pair together. Can be slightly difficult when you've got a few enemies bearing down on you though.

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* Implied in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', as stationary cars can be stolen and start up just as fast as ones taken while running. In the fourth installment, the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission.mission; the process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster. The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. Still, the trope is played straight. In ''IV'', the hotwiring process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster.
* In ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark2008'', Edward can get in to any car around Central Park, pull a few wires out and there's a little minigame for you to get the right pair together. Can be slightly difficult when you've got a few enemies bearing down on you though.


* Averted in most of the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games because the protagonist never actually hotwires anything. Except for the fourth installment, where the trope is played straight, as the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission.
** The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. Still, the trope is played straight.
** ''GTA IV'' is also playing the trope straight. The hotwiring process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster.

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* Averted Implied in most of the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' games because the protagonist never actually hotwires anything. Except for ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', as stationary cars can be stolen and start up just as fast as ones taken while running. In the fourth installment, where the trope is played straight, as the player can see the protagonist duck under the dashboard to start the engine whenever he jacks a car outside of a mission.
**
mission. The DS version of ''Videogame/GrandTheftAutoChinatownWars'' requires work on the touch screen to hotwire a car. Still, the trope is played straight.
** ''GTA IV'' is also playing the trope
straight. The In ''IV'', the hotwiring process is mostly automatic once you press the gas button, but if you keep hitting it, your character will do it faster.

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* ''Series/TheGrandTour'': May tries to invoke the trope by assuring Hammond he can hotwire a truck so he and the others can escape a SimulatedUrbanCombatArea. Instead, he electrocutes himself. Adding insult to injury, Hammond invokes KeyUnderTheDoormat on their next attempt, and successfully finds the keys in the truck's sun visor.

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* In ''Film/ShockTreatment'', Betty can somehow hotwire a car with her hairpin by sticking it under the hood.

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