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* ''Film/ThreeHundred'' is a (somewhat) historical war epic that makes use of prosthetics, GreenScreen and lots of computer graphics. The same battle was depicted in the movie ''The Three Hundred Spartans'' decades earlier with little more than fancy costumes and prop swords.

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* ''Film/ThreeHundred'' is a (somewhat) ([[DanBrowned somewhat]]) historical war epic that makes use of prosthetics, GreenScreen and lots of computer graphics. The same battle was depicted in the movie ''The Three Hundred Spartans'' decades earlier with little more than fancy costumes and prop swords.



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* ''Film/CitizenKane'' is a shockingly FX-heavy film given its subject matter (the life story of a newspaper tycoon, told in flashback after his death). Various compositing processes were used to incorporate miniatures and matte paintings in order to depict locations like the opera house and Kane's mansion on a budget, and similar techniques were used to fake the film's signature deep focus effect in shots where it could not be achieved through lenses alone, with foreground and background elements photographed separately, each in focus, then combined to make a single image.



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* Most of the CGI in ''Film/AlitaBattleAngel'' is used in a perfectly sensible way, but did they ''really'' need to give Alita BigAnimeEyes ''in a live-action movie''? Not only does it plunge her into the UncannyValley, but Creator/RosaSalazar already looks a lot like the character did in [[Manga/{{Gunnm}} the original manga]], making one wonder why they bothered with motion-capture.


* TakashiMiike's film adaptation of ''Film/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'' introduces a bizarre holographic system for projecting evidence in the courtroom that was completely absent from the original game, most likely in an effort to get the dramatic effect across when Phoenix Wright shouts "Take That!", and shoves the evidence at the witnesses' faces.

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* TakashiMiike's Creator/TakashiMiike's film adaptation of ''Film/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'' introduces a bizarre holographic system for projecting evidence in the courtroom that was completely absent from the original game, most likely in an effort to get the dramatic effect across when Phoenix Wright shouts "Take That!", and shoves the evidence at the witnesses' faces.


[[quoteright:155:[[ComicBook/SinCity http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/yellowbastard_8800.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:155:No, he isn't a RubberForeheadAlien from a sci-fi flick. He's from a DeliberatelyMonochrome crime-thriller.]]

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[[quoteright:155:[[ComicBook/SinCity [[quoteright:350:[[ComicBook/SinCity http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/yellowbastard_8800.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:155:No,
org/pmwiki/pub/images/sin_city_junior_sfx.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:No,
he isn't a RubberForeheadAlien from a sci-fi flick. He's from a DeliberatelyMonochrome crime-thriller.]]]]


[[AC: Film]]
* A large portion of the budget for ''Film/{{Amelie}}'' was CGI despite being a romantic comedy. In the beginning, she is shown playing doctor with a stuffed animal as a little girl. This is a common enough scene and a real stuffed animal could easily be used. The director used a CGI stuffed animal in order to show it moving '''slightly'''. It's barely noticeable by many audience members. There was also a scene in which Amelie turned into a puddle of water in order to convey a sad mood. These are just two examples.
* ''Film/SinCity'' was very over the top but when it comes down to it, it was a standard action movie that could have used the same special effects that have been around since the 70's. Instead, it broke ground in special effects by creating fully digital environments. You would expect this from a sci-fi movie that takes place on another planet, not a crime-thriller. This was done so that the movie could be as close to the original comic series as possible.
* ''Film/JayAndSilentBobStrikeBack'' is a stoner comedy, but it contains several fantasy sequences with big special effects and even a lightsaber fight (apparently, the movie they were shooting had real lightsabers and not props).
* ''Film/ForrestGump'': While SFX were used toward particular purposes (e.g., removing Gary Sinese's legs or inserting Tom Hanks into historical stock footage), there's also the feather {{bookends}}.

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[[AC: Film]]
[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: Film ]]

* A large portion of the budget for ''Film/{{Amelie}}'' was CGI despite being a romantic comedy. In the beginning, she is shown playing doctor with a stuffed animal as a little girl. This is a common enough scene and a real stuffed animal could easily be used. The director used a CGI stuffed animal in order to show it moving '''slightly'''. It's barely noticeable by many audience members. There was also a scene in which Amelie turned into a puddle of water in order to convey a sad mood. These are just two examples.
examples.
* ''Film/SinCity'' was very over the top but when it comes down to it, it was a standard action movie that could have used the same special effects that have been around since the 70's. Instead, it broke ground in special effects by creating fully digital environments. You would expect this from a sci-fi movie that takes place on another planet, not a crime-thriller. This was done so that the movie could be as close to the original comic series as possible.
possible.
* ''Film/JayAndSilentBobStrikeBack'' is a stoner comedy, but it contains several fantasy sequences with big special effects and even a lightsaber fight (apparently, the movie they were shooting had real lightsabers and not props).
props).
* ''Film/ForrestGump'': While SFX were used toward particular purposes (e.g., removing Gary Sinese's legs or inserting Tom Hanks into historical stock footage), there's also the feather {{bookends}}.



[[AC: Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' had an ImagineSpot OnceAnEpisode. They often featured somewhat elaborate special effects. For instance, in an early episode, JD imagines that his head blows up in a scene that would be more appropriate in a horror film. It was a comedy/medical drama.

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[[AC: [[/folder]]

[[folder:
Live-Action TV]]
TV ]]

* ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' had an ImagineSpot OnceAnEpisode. They often featured somewhat elaborate special effects. For instance, in an early episode, JD imagines that his head blows up in a scene that would be more appropriate in a horror film. It was a comedy/medical drama.



[[AC: Web Original]]

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[[AC: [[/folder]]

[[folder:
Web Original]] Original ]]


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[[/folder]]


* Even ''BrokebackMountain'', a tender romantic drama, used [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPw5plmkd6Q extensive CGI.]]

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* Even ''BrokebackMountain'', ''Film/BrokebackMountain'', a tender romantic drama, used [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPw5plmkd6Q extensive CGI.]]


* A large portion of the budget for ''{{Amelie}}'' was CGI despite being a romantic comedy. In the beginning, she is shown playing doctor with a stuffed animal as a little girl. This is a common enough scene and a real stuffed animal could easily be used. The director used a CGI stuffed animal in order to show it moving '''slightly'''. It's barely noticeable by many audience members. There was also a scene in which Amelie turned into a puddle of water in order to convey a sad mood. These are just two examples.

to:

* A large portion of the budget for ''{{Amelie}}'' ''Film/{{Amelie}}'' was CGI despite being a romantic comedy. In the beginning, she is shown playing doctor with a stuffed animal as a little girl. This is a common enough scene and a real stuffed animal could easily be used. The director used a CGI stuffed animal in order to show it moving '''slightly'''. It's barely noticeable by many audience members. There was also a scene in which Amelie turned into a puddle of water in order to convey a sad mood. These are just two examples.


* Even ''BrokebackMountain'', a tender romantic drama, used [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPw5plmkd6Q extensive CGI]].

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* Even ''BrokebackMountain'', a tender romantic drama, used [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPw5plmkd6Q extensive CGI]]. CGI.]]


* Much like ''Scrubs'', there was at least a OnceAnEpisode ImagineSpot in ''AllyMcBeal''. It typically used CGI, which was extremely rare for a show like ''Ally [=McBeal=]'' (law drama) in the 1990s.
* Predating ''Scrubs'' and ''Ally [=McBeal=]'' was the 1997 ''ThirdRockFromTheSun'' episode "A Nightmare on Dick Street", which featured {{Dream Sequence}}s with production values far higher than that of the actual show, including some CGI. It was a ThreeDimensionalEpisode, with said dreams originally broadcast in 3D.

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* Much like ''Scrubs'', there was at least a OnceAnEpisode ImagineSpot in ''AllyMcBeal''.''Series/AllyMcBeal''. It typically used CGI, which was extremely rare for a show like ''Ally [=McBeal=]'' (law drama) in the 1990s.
* Predating ''Scrubs'' and ''Ally [=McBeal=]'' was the 1997 ''ThirdRockFromTheSun'' ''Series/ThirdRockFromTheSun'' episode "A Nightmare on Dick Street", which featured {{Dream Sequence}}s with production values far higher than that of the actual show, including some CGI. It was a ThreeDimensionalEpisode, with said dreams originally broadcast in 3D.



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* Averted by the British drama ''Film/{{Suffragette}}'', a historical drama set in the 1910s. This has nearly 200 effects shots (stitch that, Creator/MichaelBay!), but none of them are meant to be noticed by the audience. If you want modern London to look like old London, flogging the computers is a lot cheaper than hiring thousands of extras.


** It should be noted that while ''300'' was based on a comic by FrankMiller, the comic was more or less realistic. At least compared to the movie which had monsters and goat-boys throughout. In fact, the inclusion of the goat-boy was a ThrowItIn moment by Zack Snyder who saw a sketch by a production designer and decided to put it in.

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** It should be noted that while ''300'' was based on a comic by FrankMiller, Creator/FrankMiller, the comic was more or less realistic. At least compared to the movie which had monsters and goat-boys throughout. In fact, the inclusion of the goat-boy was a ThrowItIn moment by Zack Snyder who saw a sketch by a production designer and decided to put it in.


* [[TakashiMiike Takashi Miike's]] film adaptation of ''Film/AceAttorney'' introduces a bizzare holographic system for projecting evidence in the courtroom that was completely absent from the original game, most likely in an effort to get the dramatic effect across when Phoenix Wright shouts "Take That!", and shoves the evidence at the witnesses' faces.

to:

* [[TakashiMiike Takashi Miike's]] TakashiMiike's film adaptation of ''Film/AceAttorney'' ''Film/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'' introduces a bizzare bizarre holographic system for projecting evidence in the courtroom that was completely absent from the original game, most likely in an effort to get the dramatic effect across when Phoenix Wright shouts "Take That!", and shoves the evidence at the witnesses' faces.


* ''Film/ForrestGump'': While SFX were used toward particular purposes (e.g., removing Gary Sinese's legs or inserting Tom Hanks into historical stock footage), there's also the feather BookEnds.

to:

* ''Film/ForrestGump'': While SFX were used toward particular purposes (e.g., removing Gary Sinese's legs or inserting Tom Hanks into historical stock footage), there's also the feather BookEnds.{{bookends}}.


* ''{{Scrubs}}'' had an ImagineSpot OnceAnEpisode. They often featured somewhat elaborate special effects. For instance, in an early episode, JD imagines that his head blows up in a scene that would be more appropriate in a horror film. It was a comedy/medical drama.

to:

* ''{{Scrubs}}'' ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'' had an ImagineSpot OnceAnEpisode. They often featured somewhat elaborate special effects. For instance, in an early episode, JD imagines that his head blows up in a scene that would be more appropriate in a horror film. It was a comedy/medical drama.

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