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->''"Nothing fucking works! Nothing fucking works!"''
-->-- '''[[WebVideo/TheAngryJoeShow Angry Joe]]''', reviewing ''[[https://youtu.be/LkwRJz1-2Qg?t=91 Sonic Free Riders]]''


* {{Rhythm Game}}s using the Harmonix "score doubler" power-up (''VideoGame/{{Frequency}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Amplitude}}'', ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'', and ''VideoGame/RockBand'') have [[http://guitarhero.wikia.com/wiki/Squeezing squeezing]], a technique where playing ''slightly'' off-beat, but still within the timing window for the notes, can gain you more points. You start the score doubler a hair after a note's normal time and play the note right after activating it, giving one extra note for the score doubler to work. If you want to get to the top of the high score tables, it's practically required.

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* {{Rhythm Game}}s using the Harmonix "score doubler" power-up (''VideoGame/{{Frequency}}'', (''VideoGame/{{Frequency|Harmonix}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Amplitude}}'', ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'', and ''VideoGame/RockBand'') have [[http://guitarhero.wikia.com/wiki/Squeezing squeezing]], a technique where playing ''slightly'' off-beat, but still within the timing window for the notes, can gain you more points. You start the score doubler a hair after a note's normal time and play the note right after activating it, giving one extra note for the score doubler to work. If you want to get to the top of the high score tables, it's practically required.


** Many players "farm" old raids and dungeons for gold, cool-looking gear, and mounts by tackling them alone. While the level discrepancy usually makes it easy to simply [[CurbStompBattle curbstomp the enemies to oblivion]], more recent out-dated bosses and bosses with special mechanics require either special strategies, very high damage output, or both. A particularly infamous example of bosses that suffer GameplayDerailment when soloed is Spine of Deathwing, the penultimate boss of ''Cataclysm'''s final raid, whose original strategy hinged on the raid members standing in two groups on the boss' back - too much weight on either side and the boss would roll around, sending all players not affected by a certain buff to their dooms. With only one player, however, you have to ''constantly'' run between the left and right halves of the back, and standing still for a second too long [[OneHitKill means instant death.]]

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** Many players "farm" old raids and dungeons for gold, cool-looking gear, and mounts by tackling them alone. While the level discrepancy usually makes it easy to simply [[CurbStompBattle curbstomp the enemies to oblivion]], more recent out-dated bosses and bosses with special mechanics require either special strategies, very high damage output, or both. A particularly infamous example of bosses that suffer GameplayDerailment Gameplay Derailment when soloed is Spine of Deathwing, the penultimate boss of ''Cataclysm'''s final raid, whose original strategy hinged on the raid members standing in two groups on the boss' back - too much weight on either side and the boss would roll around, sending all players not affected by a certain buff to their dooms. With only one player, however, you have to ''constantly'' run between the left and right halves of the back, and standing still for a second too long [[OneHitKill means instant death.]]


** Ironically, the opposite ended up happening when the show was revived in 2015. Over the years, engineering skill had improved drastically, resulting in more and more powerful [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning spinner-armed robots]], until spinners became first the predominant weapon on the show, then effectively the ''only'' weapon worth using (not helped by [[MovingTheGoalposts the showrunners completely banning wedges and changing the scoring rules to make damage done with an "active weapon" the be-all and end-all]]). By the middle of the 2018 series, only ''one'' robot out of every one in the top 16 (the box flipper Bronco) was ''not'' armed with some kind of spinning weapon,[[note]]admittedly [=SawBlaze=] was armed with a circular saw blade rather than an impact damage weapon like a bar, disc, or drum spinner[[/note]] and it was knocked out in the semis. While this is good news for fans of unmitigated carnage, other fans are less happy with the loss of variety and reduced emphasis on driving skill in favour of A [[MemeticMutation "BIG HIT!"]]

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** Ironically, the opposite ended up happening when the show was revived in 2015. Over the years, engineering skill had improved drastically, resulting in more and more powerful [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning [[SpectacularSpinning spinner-armed robots]], until spinners became first the predominant weapon on the show, then effectively the ''only'' weapon worth using (not helped by [[MovingTheGoalposts the showrunners completely banning wedges and changing the scoring rules to make damage done with an "active weapon" the be-all and end-all]]). By the middle of the 2018 series, only ''one'' robot out of every one in the top 16 (the box flipper Bronco) was ''not'' armed with some kind of spinning weapon,[[note]]admittedly [=SawBlaze=] was armed with a circular saw blade rather than an impact damage weapon like a bar, disc, or drum spinner[[/note]] and it was knocked out in the semis. While this is good news for fans of unmitigated carnage, other fans are less happy with the loss of variety and reduced emphasis on driving skill in favour of A [[MemeticMutation "BIG HIT!"]]

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* In Burgle My Banana, [[Website/GiantBomb Giant Bomb's]] gambling-infused playthrough of ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong64'', players were awarded with a spin of a roulette wheel each time they collected a coin. The rarity of coins was vastly overestimated and players quickly found that coin hunting was a more profitable venture than actually progressing through the game; each task completed only provided a single banana, the metagame's currency, whereas a spin of the wheel could grant many.


* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriorsOnline'' suffers from a lesser version of this. [[LimitBreak Muosu attacks]] make the user invincible as they unleash a temporary unbreakable combo. While a legitimate, intended attack, depending on who you are playing with, this might make up most of their attacks against you. Some people go Munchkin and max out their attack and musou, allowing you to go longer, and, weapon permitting, spam the stronger version, then run away from battle to refill. Given how powerful you can make a weapon, this may be an easy way of defeating somebody. This lead to the English-language version of the game PVP being full mostly of attempted one-combo kills in order to win the match, rather than using any other attacks. It's balanced out as time went on, with less people relying on Musou in PVP.

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* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriorsOnline'' suffers from a lesser version of this. [[LimitBreak Muosu attacks]] make the user invincible as they unleash a temporary unbreakable combo. While a legitimate, intended attack, depending on who you are playing with, this might make up most of their attacks against you. Some people go Munchkin and max out their attack and musou, allowing you to go longer, and, weapon permitting, spam the stronger version, then run away from battle to refill. Given how powerful you can make a weapon, this may be an easy way of defeating somebody. This lead to the English-language version of the game PVP [=PvP=] being full mostly of attempted one-combo kills in order to win the match, rather than using any other attacks. It's balanced out as time went on, with less people relying on Musou in PVP.[=PvP=].



* ''Videogame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' had a special event on Ilum that put several PvE quests in a free-for-all PvP area, possibly to drum up more interest on PvP. Well, in a matter of ''hours'' players realized that there was no additional reward for attacking other players, aside from the dubious joys of ganking and griefing. Furthermore, doing the PvE quests were ''much easier'' in the PvP area. Cue some server-wide "truces" in the PvP area with Imperial and Republic players cooperating on the daily quests, orderly lines forming for an orb drop-off puzzle, and some of the PvP heavy guilds on ''both'' Republic and Imperial sides coming out of it with nasty reputations for breaking said truce.

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* ''Videogame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' had a special event on Ilum that put several PvE quests in a free-for-all PvP [=PvP=] area, possibly to drum up more interest on PvP.[=PvP=]. Well, in a matter of ''hours'' players realized that there was no additional reward for attacking other players, aside from the dubious joys of ganking and griefing. Furthermore, doing the PvE quests were ''much easier'' in the PvP [=PvP=] area. Cue some server-wide "truces" in the PvP [=PvP=] area with Imperial and Republic players cooperating on the daily quests, orderly lines forming for an orb drop-off puzzle, and some of the PvP [=PvP=] heavy guilds on ''both'' Republic and Imperial sides coming out of it with nasty reputations for breaking said truce.


* Gold farming exploits have always been prevalent in ''VideoGame/{{Fable}}'', from selling items for more than you bought them for in the first game, to buying massive amounts of property and farming rent payments in the second. Most players will probably spend more time becoming scam artists and real estate tycoons then they do adventuring. ''Fable 3'' did nothing to fix this, with exploiting the real estate market being the only way for good players to achieve the GoldenEnding. Building a personal fortune of over 1 million gold and funding the army yourself is the only way to keep your promises.

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* Gold farming exploits have always been prevalent in ''VideoGame/{{Fable}}'', from selling items for more than you bought them for in the first game, to buying massive amounts of property and farming rent payments in the second. Most players will probably spend more time becoming scam artists and real estate tycoons then than they do adventuring. ''Fable 3'' did nothing to fix this, with exploiting the real estate market being the only way for good players to achieve the GoldenEnding. Building a personal fortune of over 1 million gold and funding the army yourself is the only way to keep your promises.

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** The original ''Diablo 3'' featured built-in inter-player trading via the marketplace. This meant that until you reached the highest Inferno type difficulty levels, the best strategy was not to make use of any items found while exploring, but to sell them all for gold to spend on the marketplace; since players on the higher levels would be getting items as "junk" which would be useless on those levels but incredibly powerful on the lower levels, they would usually be available almost on demand for extremely low prices. For similar reasons, there was no point upgrading the in-game gem crafters or item upgrade stations because doing so would cost significantly more than just buying the higher power gems from other players.


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* The board game ''Eclipse'' had an infamous gameplay derailment related to Plasma Missiles. They created the Missile Frigate strategy, a player who loads their ship entirely with Plasma Missiles and Targetting Computers; such a ship is technically very vulnerable, but never takes damage because the Missiles fire before any other combat phase and wipe the opponent out before their damage can be dealt. The only counter to this strategy is to fill a ship with armor plating and only a small number of weapons, but this requires so many resources it will likely cause both the Missile Frigate player and the armored ship player to lose to players who are not involved in this deadlock. This means that the majority of the game is about making sure that players are in a position to prevent Missile Frigates being played.
* The board game ''Chameleon'' is derailed entirely in standard gameplay by a glitch in the rules. If a player needs only one point to win, mindlessly accusing them of being the Chameleon every round regardless of clues will always prevent them doing so. This is resolved if a second player reaches that position, but this means players want to avoid being the first in a winning position, creating a Prisoner's Dilemma.

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* Twice in ''Old School VideoGame/RuneScape''. The first is prayer flicking, which is activating a protection prayer active on the same tick[[note]]0.6 seconds[[/note]] an attack is considered "active" to negate the damage, then turning it off the very next one. This strategy is so effective that it actually turned very hard bosses into a much easier fight, and had Jagex require future bosses target tiles with some of their attacks to provide some semblance of challenge without entering FakeDifficulty territory by removing tells on monsters with multiple attack styles. This notably was around even in [=RS2=], before Evolution of Combat (where it doesn't work due to the nerf to protection prayers) was created, let alone implemented, but a lack of understanding the game's mechanics made it very uncommon and more a gimmick.
** The second is tick eating, or eating immediately after damage is registered, but before the game registers you as dead. Due to a quirk in how the game handles HP, you'll never drop below zero HP, meaning you're effectively immortal as long as your food stack lasts. Jagex has done nothing about this, however, due to the fact that it's so impossibly hard even while standing still, let alone while being able to fight back. There's only '''''one player''''' that's able to consistently do it in actual combat, and even then he's not capable of beating the hardest bosses in the game 100% of the time with it. [[https://www.twitch.tv/videos/306014487 It has to be seen to be believed]].


* A non-gaming example. When the BonusRound was first introduced on ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' in 1981, the rules stated that the contestant was given a blank puzzle, and had to pick five consonants and a vowel to assist in solving the puzzle within a 15-second time limit. Most contestants picked some permutation of R, S, T, L, N, and E, occasionally swapping out H or D. This went on for seven years before they just started giving RSTLNE automatically, and prompting the contestant for three more consonants and a vowel while also making the puzzles a bit less reliant on common letters (it's rare for RSTLNE to reveal so much as half of the answer) and slashing the time limit to 10 seconds.
** Another example from the same show. The "Same Name" category (two names, phrases, etc. joined because they end in the same word; e.g. "BAKING & CREAM SODA" or "DENZEL & GEORGE WASHINGTON") originally spelled out the word AND, thus leading to nearly every contestant calling N and D, then buying A right out of the gate. The puzzle writers were quick to catch on, and swapped out the word for an ampersand. Oddly, this got inverted in the 2000s, as Same Name began reverting to AND with increasing frequency.
** Defied with the "What Are You Doing?" category, where the answer almost always ends in -ING. They seem more than happy to let contestants always go N-G-I first.


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* A non-gaming example. When the BonusRound was first introduced on ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' in 1981, the rules stated that the contestant was given a blank puzzle, and had to pick five consonants and a vowel to assist in solving the puzzle within a 15-second time limit. Most contestants picked some permutation of R, S, T, L, N, and E, occasionally swapping out H or D. This went on for seven years before they just started giving RSTLNE automatically, and prompting the contestant for three more consonants and a vowel while also making the puzzles a bit less reliant on common letters (it's rare for RSTLNE to reveal so much as half of the answer) and slashing the time limit to 10 seconds.
** Another example from the same show. The "Same Name" category (two names, phrases, etc. joined because they end in the same word; e.g. "BAKING & CREAM SODA" or "DENZEL & GEORGE WASHINGTON") originally spelled out the word AND, thus leading to nearly every contestant calling N and D, then buying A right out of the gate. The puzzle writers were quick to catch on, and swapped out the word for an ampersand. Oddly, this got inverted in the 2000s, as Same Name began reverting to AND with increasing frequency.
** Defied with the "What Are You Doing?" category, where the answer almost always ends in -ING. They seem more than happy to let contestants always go N-G-I first.
* Another non-gaming example occurs on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', and is known as the "Forrest Bounce" (after Chuck Forrest, the first notable contestant to use it as a gameplay strategy). While most contestants pick clues top-to-bottom, some over the years have found that it can be beneficial to select clues further down the board or randomly bounce between categories -- the idea being that the [[BonusSpace Daily Double]] usually hides near the bottom of the board, and getting a bunch of lower-box clues correct can beef up one's score in a hurry due to their higher value. The strategy really took off when champion Arthur Chu used it to his advantage, which led to a marked increase in Forrest bouncing by subsequent contestants. However, host Creator/AlexTrebek has said that he doesn't find it a worthwile strategy, since it often leads to contestants hitting the Daily Double too early and thus having too little to wager on it, or failing to pick up on the theme of a category by starting near the bottom or bouncing around.
** Chu was also responsible for one tactic that ended up getting an ObviousRulePatch: many times during his run, he wagered to tie on Final Jeopardy!, so that a victory meant that he would be co-champion with another contestant, and thus deal with only one unknown on the next episode instead of two. This occurred so many times during his run that the show changed the rules, requiring a tiebreaker clue to be played should a tie for first place occur after the Final Jeopardy! round (which was previously the case only in tournaments). Surprisingly, it took several years for the "tiebreaker clue" rule to actually be invoked during regular play.


* In ''Tetris Splash'', ''Tetris Friends'', and many other newer ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'' games, the "marathon" mode uses a variable goal system, in which more line clears will subtract more goal units (a single will take off 1 unit, but a Tetris takes off ''eight''), resulting in lower line clears, especially line clears chained together, yielding more points per goal unit, as demonstrated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISANNTEf3J0 here]]. In other words: continously making Tetrises ''actually hurts your score.''

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* In ''Tetris Splash'', ''Tetris Friends'', and many other newer ''VideoGame/{{Tetris}}'' games, the "marathon" mode uses a variable goal system, in which more line clears will subtract more goal units (a single will take off 1 unit, but a Tetris takes off ''eight''), resulting in lower line clears, especially line clears chained together, yielding more points per goal unit, as demonstrated [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISANNTEf3J0 here]]. In other words: continously making Tetrises ''actually hurts your score.'''' This is taken to an extreme in ''[[VideoGame/PuyoPuyo Puyo Puyo Tetris]]'', where the best strategy to win against other players isn't to make Tetrises, but to make a hole that's four squares wide while topping the other parts of the screen and then filling that hole in, one line at a time.


** A particularly extreme example is Manaless Dredge, a deck which uses the Dredge mechanic to completely turn the game on its head. As the name implies, it runs no {{Mana}} at all - instead, it chooses to go second (or has its opponent choose to go first, which is almost guaranteed in the lightning-paced Legacy format), draws an eighth card on its first turn, plays nothing, and discards a card with dredge due to being over its maximum hand size. It then uses this card to begin moving large numbers of cards from its library to its graveyard, triggering abilities on creatures like Narcomoeba and Ichorid that send them from the graveyard to the battlefield automatically.

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** A particularly extreme example is Manaless Dredge, a deck which uses the Dredge mechanic to completely turn the game on its head. As the name implies, it runs no {{Mana}} at all - instead, it chooses to go second (or has its opponent choose to go first, which is almost guaranteed in the lightning-paced Legacy format), draws an eighth card on its first turn, plays nothing, and discards a card with dredge due to being over its maximum hand size. It then uses this card to begin moving large numbers of cards from its library to its graveyard, triggering abilities on creatures like Narcomoeba [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=452797 Narcomoeba]] and Ichorid [[http://gatherer.wizards.com/Pages/Card/Details.aspx?multiverseid=413635 Ichorid]] that send them from the graveyard to the battlefield automatically.


* ''VideoGame/PAYDAY2'' has the Rats heist, which is a three-day mission where you have to cook meth on the first day to get information from a gang in the second day and use said information to be able to defuse the C4 on the third day so you can get the money on a bus without the whole thing exploding in your face. Normally, cooking a lot of meth to get extra cash on the second day and getting all the money bags in the third would get you tons of money. However, after a patch gave an experience boost to multi-day heists, players quickly discovered that Rats gives nearly 300,000 experience points regardless of whether you cook the meth or blow up the lab by botching the cooking. The end result caused swarms of players farming the Rats heist by speedrunning it (blow up the lab, get or don't get the info, then kill the enemy gang in the last day and leave) so they can easily level up with minimal effort. The swarms of Rats farmers, however, also frustrate other players who want to play the heist the proper way.

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* ''VideoGame/PAYDAY2'' has the Rats heist, which is a three-day mission where you have to cook meth on the first day to get information from a gang in the second day day, and use said information to be able to defuse the C4 on the third day so you can get the money on a bus without the whole thing exploding in your face. Normally, cooking a lot of meth to get extra cash on the second day and getting all the money bags in the third would get you tons of money. However, after a patch gave an experience boost to multi-day heists, players quickly discovered that Rats gives nearly 300,000 experience points regardless of whether you cook the meth or blow up the lab by botching the cooking. The end result caused swarms of players farming the Rats heist by speedrunning it (blow up the lab, get or don't get the info, then kill the enemy gang in the last day and leave) so they can easily level up with minimal effort. The swarms of Rats farmers, however, also frustrate other players who want to play the heist the proper way. A later patch changed experience gains to be based off of objectives completed, with a ''huge'' bonus for cooking all 7 batches of meth, causing many players to slow right back down and cook once more.


** A particularly extreme example is Manaless Dredge, a deck which uses the Dredge mechanic to completely turn the game on its head. As the name implies, it runs no {{Mana}} at all - instead, it draws an eighth card as soon as possible, plays nothing, and discards a card with dredge due to being over its maximum hand size. It then uses this card to begin moving large numbers of cards from its library to its graveyard, triggering abilities on creatures like Narcomoeba and Ichorid that send them from the graveyard to the battlefield automatically.

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** A particularly extreme example is Manaless Dredge, a deck which uses the Dredge mechanic to completely turn the game on its head. As the name implies, it runs no {{Mana}} at all - instead, it chooses to go second (or has its opponent choose to go first, which is almost guaranteed in the lightning-paced Legacy format), draws an eighth card as soon as possible, on its first turn, plays nothing, and discards a card with dredge due to being over its maximum hand size. It then uses this card to begin moving large numbers of cards from its library to its graveyard, triggering abilities on creatures like Narcomoeba and Ichorid that send them from the graveyard to the battlefield automatically.

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** A particularly extreme example is Manaless Dredge, a deck which uses the Dredge mechanic to completely turn the game on its head. As the name implies, it runs no {{Mana}} at all - instead, it draws an eighth card as soon as possible, plays nothing, and discards a card with dredge due to being over its maximum hand size. It then uses this card to begin moving large numbers of cards from its library to its graveyard, triggering abilities on creatures like Narcomoeba and Ichorid that send them from the graveyard to the battlefield automatically.

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