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[[quoteright:350:[[Creator/EpicGames http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/untitled_396.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:If you've played video games in the past decade or so, you've probably seen this logo.]]


** Unreal Engine 4, which both advances the graphics of the Unreal Engine to next-gen levels while simplifying the development process in many ways (such as switching to a fully dynamic lighting pipeline and, [[BrokenBase perhaps controversially]] removing [=UnrealScript=] in favor of extending Kismet (Unreal's visual scripting system, now called "Blueprint") and C++ access). Like the UDK, Epic has been attempting to reach out to indies far more with [=UE4=] compared to [=UE3=], likely to compete with the rising popularity of Unity. As march 2015, UE4 was made free to use with a 5% yearly royalty cost.

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** Unreal Engine 4, which both advances the graphics of the Unreal Engine to next-gen levels while simplifying the development process in many ways (such as switching to a fully dynamic lighting pipeline and, [[BrokenBase perhaps controversially]] removing [=UnrealScript=] in favor of extending Kismet (Unreal's visual scripting system, now called "Blueprint") and C++ access). Like the UDK, Epic has been attempting to reach out to indies far more with [=UE4=] compared to [=UE3=], likely to compete with the rising popularity of Unity. As march 2015, UE4 [=UE4=] was made free to use with a 5% yearly royalty cost.cost. Originally, the first [=UE4=] game was meant to be Epic's own ''VideoGame/{{Fortnite}}''. However, thanks to entering DevelopmentHell, this never really panned out. (This may be why the game uses a colorful, stylised art style - Epic likely wanted to use their big TechDemoGame to help Unreal 4 avoid the association Unreal 3 had with RealIsBrown.)
*** Unreal Engine 4 is particularly notable for being ''incredibly'' popular with Japanese developers, almost to the same extent that Unreal 3 was in the west. Japanese games developed on it include ''[[VideoGame/DragonBallFighterZ Dragon Ball FighterZ]]'', ''VideoGame/DragonQuestXI'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Shenmue}} Shenmue III]]'', ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiV'', ''VideoGame/SoulCaliburVI'', ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIIRemake'', ''[[VideoGame/{{Tekken}} Tekken 7]]'', ''[[VideoGame/AceCombat7SkiesUnknown Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown]]'' and the as-of yet unnamed UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch sequel to ''VideoGame/YoshisWoollyWorld''. This can likely be attributed to both to Epic Games providing proper Japanese documentation and support, which they failed to do with Unreal Engine 3, and the fact that in the seventh console generation, Japanese developers ran into a bad habit of spending years and years making their own expensive engines that often only saw use in a few games, or [[{{Vaporware}} never saw use at all]] - in comparison, simply using Unreal Engine 4 and paying its royalties is a much better proposition.


* SDL and SFML are commonly mistaken as game engines but they actually are multimedia libraries which can be used to make engines out of[[not1e]]The former was initially developed to make it possible to ''port'' game engines that uses DirectX exclusively and thus only targets Windows otherwise over to Linux[[/note]].

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* SDL and SFML are commonly mistaken as game engines but they actually are multimedia libraries which can be used to make engines out of[[not1e]]The of.[[note]]The former was initially developed to make it possible to ''port'' game engines that uses DirectX exclusively and thus only targets Windows otherwise over to Linux[[/note]].Linux.[[/note]]
* Similarly, XNA and it's open source implementation MonoGame are not engines but frameworks for creating games and engines using .NET/Mono languages.


* [=PhyreEngine=], engine provided by Sony Computer Entertainment for developing UsefulNotes/{{PS3}}, PSP, UsefulNotes/PSVita, and (assumedly) UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} games. Version 3.70 was leaked to the internet so you too can learn what makes your favorite console games tick. Games build on this engine include: ''VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptunia'', ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', the ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series from ''[[VideoGame/AtelierRoronaTheAlchemistOfArland Rorona]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAyeshaTheAlchemistOfDusk Ayesha]]'', ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'', and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Ironically, support for targetting Microsoft's UsefulNotes/Xbox360 and UsefulNotes/XboxOne, Android, iOS, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and even Windows was later added to the game- Sony's software division clearly made the right choice by caring more about profits from licensing the engine out than exclusivity.

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* [=PhyreEngine=], engine provided by Sony Computer Entertainment for developing UsefulNotes/{{PS3}}, PSP, UsefulNotes/PSVita, and (assumedly) UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} games. Version 3.70 was leaked to the internet so you too can learn what makes your favorite console games tick. Games build on this engine include: ''VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptunia'', ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', the ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series from ''[[VideoGame/AtelierRoronaTheAlchemistOfArland Rorona]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAyeshaTheAlchemistOfDusk Ayesha]]'', ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'', and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Ironically, support Support for targetting Microsoft's UsefulNotes/Xbox360 and UsefulNotes/XboxOne, Android, iOS, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and even Windows was later added to the game- game engine, allowing games written on the engine to be easily ported to and from Sony's software division clearly made the right choice by caring more about profits from licensing the engine out than exclusivity. platform.


* [=PhyreEngine=], engine provided by Sony Computer Entertainment for developing UsefulNotes/{{PS3}}, PSP, UsefulNotes/PSVita, and (assumedly) UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} games. Version 3.70 was leaked to the internet so you too can learn what makes your favorite console games tick. Games build on this engine include: ''VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptunia'', ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', the ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series from ''[[VideoGame/AtelierRoronaTheAlchemistOfArland Rorona]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAyeshaTheAlchemistOfDusk Ayesha]]'', ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'', and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''.

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* [=PhyreEngine=], engine provided by Sony Computer Entertainment for developing UsefulNotes/{{PS3}}, PSP, UsefulNotes/PSVita, and (assumedly) UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} games. Version 3.70 was leaked to the internet so you too can learn what makes your favorite console games tick. Games build on this engine include: ''VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptunia'', ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'', ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'', the ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' series from ''[[VideoGame/AtelierRoronaTheAlchemistOfArland Rorona]]'' to ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAyeshaTheAlchemistOfDusk Ayesha]]'', ''VideoGame/Disgaea4APromiseUnforgotten'', and ''VideoGame/{{Journey}}''. Ironically, support for targetting Microsoft's UsefulNotes/Xbox360 and UsefulNotes/XboxOne, Android, iOS, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and even Windows was later added to the game- Sony's software division clearly made the right choice by caring more about profits from licensing the engine out than exclusivity.


* SDL and SFML are commonly mistaken as game engines but they actually are multimedia libraries which can be used to make engines out of.

to:

* SDL and SFML are commonly mistaken as game engines but they actually are multimedia libraries which can be used to make engines out of.of[[not1e]]The former was initially developed to make it possible to ''port'' game engines that uses DirectX exclusively and thus only targets Windows otherwise over to Linux[[/note]].


** id Tech 6: ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 2016''

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** id Tech 6: ''VideoGame/{{Doom}} 2016''2016'', ''VideoGame/WolfensteinIITheNewColossus''


** Unreal Engine 3 (probably the most popular engine during TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames): ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar''[[note]]And the commercials by Creator/DigitalDomain[[/note]], ''VideoGame/UnrealTournamentIII'', ''VideoGame/{{Bulletstorm}}'', ''Rainbow Six: Vegas'', ''VideoGame/{{BioShock Infinite}}'', the ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series, ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant'', ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'', ''VideoGame/MirrorsEdge'', ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'', ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'', ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'', ''VideoGame/DungeonDefenders'', ''VideoGame/LollipopChainsaw'', ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'', ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'', ''[[VideoGame/XComEnemyUnknown XCOM: Enemy Unknown]]''[[note]]And, by extention, ''[=XCOM: Enemy Within=]''[[/note]], ''[[VideoGame/GuiltyGear Guilty Gear Xrd]]'', [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Unreal_Engine_games#Unreal_Engine_3 etc]]. It has also seen use in the TV series ''Series/LazyTown''

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** Unreal Engine 3 (probably the most popular engine during TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames): UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames): ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar''[[note]]And the commercials by Creator/DigitalDomain[[/note]], ''VideoGame/UnrealTournamentIII'', ''VideoGame/{{Bulletstorm}}'', ''Rainbow Six: Vegas'', ''VideoGame/{{BioShock Infinite}}'', the ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series, ''VideoGame/TheLastRemnant'', ''VideoGame/LostOdyssey'', ''VideoGame/MirrorsEdge'', ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamAsylum'', ''VideoGame/BatmanArkhamCity'', ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'', ''VideoGame/DungeonDefenders'', ''VideoGame/LollipopChainsaw'', ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'', ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'', ''[[VideoGame/XComEnemyUnknown XCOM: Enemy Unknown]]''[[note]]And, by extention, ''[=XCOM: Enemy Within=]''[[/note]], ''[[VideoGame/GuiltyGear Guilty Gear Xrd]]'', [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Unreal_Engine_games#Unreal_Engine_3 etc]]. It has also seen use in the TV series ''Series/LazyTown''


* SCUMM (Script Creation Utility for Maniac Mansion) by Creator/LucasArts (while it's only possible to make adventure games with it, it's usually considered an engine due to its complexity and wide variety of games): ''VideoGame/ManiacMansion'' (obviously), ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series (up to ''[[VideoGame/TheCurseOfMonkeyIsland Curse]]''), ''SamAndMaxHitTheRoad'', ''VideoGame/TheDig'', ''VideoGame/{{Loom}}'', the ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' adventure games. Creator/HumongousEntertainment used it for every single game they made, such as the ''VideoGame/PuttPutt'', ''VideoGame/FreddiFish'', ''VideoGame/PajamaSam'', ''VideoGame/SPYFox'', and ''VideoGame/BackyardSports'' series. Went through 11 versions, each one adding more features. Also popular for fanmade games, thanks to [[http://www.scummvm.org/ ScummVM]].

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* SCUMM (Script Creation Utility for Maniac Mansion) by Creator/LucasArts (while it's only possible to make adventure games with it, it's usually considered an engine due to its complexity and wide variety of games): ''VideoGame/ManiacMansion'' (obviously), ''VideoGame/MonkeyIsland'' series (up to ''[[VideoGame/TheCurseOfMonkeyIsland Curse]]''), ''SamAndMaxHitTheRoad'', ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxHitTheRoad'', ''VideoGame/TheDig'', ''VideoGame/{{Loom}}'', the ''Franchise/IndianaJones'' adventure games. Creator/HumongousEntertainment used it for every single game they made, such as the ''VideoGame/PuttPutt'', ''VideoGame/FreddiFish'', ''VideoGame/PajamaSam'', ''VideoGame/SPYFox'', and ''VideoGame/BackyardSports'' series. Went through 11 versions, each one adding more features. Also popular for fanmade games, thanks to [[http://www.scummvm.org/ ScummVM]].


* The [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar]] Advanced Game Engine ([[FunWithAcronyms RAGE]]), which is used in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'', ''MidnightClub: Los Angeles'', ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'', ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', and ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV''. Was first used to make [[CreatorsOddball a table tennis game]].

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* The [[Creator/TakeTwoInteractive Rockstar]] Advanced Game Engine ([[FunWithAcronyms RAGE]]), which is used in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'', ''MidnightClub: ''VideoGame/MidnightClub: Los Angeles'', ''VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption'', ''VideoGame/MaxPayne3'', and ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV''. Was first used to make [[CreatorsOddball a table tennis game]].


** Bethesda's Creation Engine, which, based on independent research, seems to be based on the same heavily modified Gamebryo Bethesda used from Morrowind onwards. Used in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' and ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}''.

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** Bethesda's * {{Creator/Bethesda}}'s Creation Engine, which, Engine (which, based on independent research, seems to be based on the same heavily modified Gamebryo Bethesda used in the ''Elder Scrolls'' series from Morrowind onwards. Used ''Morrowind'' onwards) is used in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' and ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}''.


** Later engines included Torque 2D and Torque 3D, the latter being even more versatile and flexible in game creation with examples like ''VideoGame/BeamNG.drive''. It still retains many of the admin/debug quirks such as the F11 edit mode and the F7/F8 Drop Player/Camera at Camera/Player.

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** Later engines included Torque 2D and Torque 3D, the latter being allowing even more versatile and flexible in game creation modification with examples like ''VideoGame/BeamNG.drive''. It still retains many of the admin/debug quirks such as the F11 edit mode and the F7/F8 Drop Player/Camera at Camera/Player.


* The Torque Game Engine family by Creator/{{Dynamix}} (later, [[http://www.garagegames.com/ Garage Games]]), first developed for ''[[Videogame/{{Tribes}} Tribes 2]]'' and later licensed out. It was one of the first affordable engines available to indie developers at a mere $100 in 2002. Powers ''VideoGame/{{Blockland}}'', ''Videogame/FrozenSynapse'', ''VideoGame/MarbleBlastGold'', ''VideoGame/PennyArcadeAdventures'', ''VideoGame/SpacePiratesAndZombies'', ''Videogame/ThinkTanks''.
** Later engines included Torque 2D and Torque 3D, the latter being even more versatile and flexible in game creation with examples like ''VideoGame/BeamNG.drive''. It still retains many of the admin/debug quirks such as the F11 edit mode and the F7/F8 Drop Player/Camera and Camera/Player.

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* The Torque Game Engine family by Creator/{{Dynamix}} (later, [[http://www.garagegames.com/ Garage Games]]), first developed for ''[[Videogame/{{Tribes}} Tribes 2]]'' and later licensed out. It was one of the first affordable engines available to indie developers at a mere $100 in 2002. Powers ''VideoGame/{{Blockland}}'', ''Videogame/FrozenSynapse'', ''VideoGame/MarbleBlastGold'', ''VideoGame/PennyArcadeAdventures'', ''VideoGame/SpacePiratesAndZombies'', ''Videogame/ThinkTanks''.
''Videogame/ThinkTanks''. A neat feature about maps is that the terrain continues to loop beyond the edge of the map itself, resulting in you finding an exact copy of the map in any cardinal direction sans any "interior" (structure) objects. This makes maps theoretically infinite but travelling far enough from the spawn point causes characters and objects to jitter graphically.
** Later engines included Torque 2D and Torque 3D, the latter being even more versatile and flexible in game creation with examples like ''VideoGame/BeamNG.drive''. It still retains many of the admin/debug quirks such as the F11 edit mode and the F7/F8 Drop Player/Camera and at Camera/Player.


* [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Hedgehog]] Engine by Creator/{{Sega}}: An engine built to render CGI-quality graphics using global illumination (allowing for complex lighting and directional shadows) very quickly. Used in the HD versions of ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'', ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' and ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld''.

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* [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Hedgehog]] Engine by Creator/{{Sega}}: An engine built to render CGI-quality graphics using global illumination (allowing for complex lighting and directional shadows) very quickly. Used in the HD versions of ''VideoGame/SonicUnleashed'', ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' and ''VideoGame/SonicLostWorld''. An improved version of the engine, dubbed "Hedgehog Engine 2", was used in ''VideoGame/SonicForces''.
* Dragon Engine by Creator/{{Sega}}: An engine made to take full advantage of the Playstation 4's technical prowess for the ''VideoGame/{{Yakuza}}'' series. First used in ''VideoGame/Yakuza6'', it is also used in ''[[VideoGame/Yakuza2 Yakuza Kiwami 2]]''.


* ''[=GameMaker=] Studio'' (1999-present): Started out as ''Animo'', a 2D animation program, and was simply called ''[=GameMaker=]'' prior to a major overhaul in 2012. It is now technically complex enough to be considered a full-fledged 2D GameEngine, not a GameMaker. [[{{Irony}} Ironic.]] If you know what you're doing, you can even make 3D games with it. Those are much less common, though, and with good reason: they are much harder to do than any 2D game. Examples of games made with this engine include ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', ''VideoGame/{{HyperLightDrifter}}'', games by Locomalito (including ''VideoGame/MalditaCastilla'' and ''VideoGame/{{Hydorah}}''), as well as earlier versions of ''VideoGame/{{Spelunky}}'' and ''VideoGame/HotlineMiami''.

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* ''[=GameMaker=] Studio'' (1999-present): Started out as ''Animo'', a 2D animation program, and was simply called ''[=GameMaker=]'' prior to a major overhaul in 2012. It is now technically complex enough to be considered a full-fledged 2D GameEngine, not a GameMaker. [[{{Irony}} Ironic.]] If you know what you're doing, you can even make 3D games with it. Those are much less common, though, and with good reason: they are much harder to do than any 2D game. Examples of games made with this engine include ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', ''VideoGame/{{HyperLightDrifter}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Imscared}}'', games by Locomalito (including ''VideoGame/MalditaCastilla'' and ''VideoGame/{{Hydorah}}''), as well as earlier versions of ''VideoGame/{{Spelunky}}'' and ''VideoGame/HotlineMiami''.

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