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[[quoteright:300:[[WesternAnimation/SouthPark https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/basement_5691.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:300:Doesn't always have to live in a basement.]]-]



-->-- '''Timmy the Internet''', ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'', "[[TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E37TheInternet The Internet]]"


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-->-- '''Timmy the Internet''', ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'', "[[TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E37TheInternet "[[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E37TheInternet The Internet]]"

Internet]]"

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[[quoteright:300:[[WesternAnimation/SouthPark https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/basement_5691.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:300:Doesn't always have to live in a basement.]]-]

->''I can be a jerk to anyone, while I'm behind the screen, in the safety and comfort of my own home.''"
-->-- '''Timmy the Internet''', ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'', "[[TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E37TheInternet The Internet]]"



This is a {{Subtrope}} to SeriousBusiness. VocalMinority is from where most of this comes. See also InternetToughGuy, {{Troll}}, GarbagePostKid, ADarkerMe, BecameTheirOwnAntithesis, TheGadfly, and {{Griefer}} for specific forms of this, or any comment section. Compare to WhatYouAreInTheDark.

to:

This is a {{Subtrope}} to SeriousBusiness. VocalMinority is from where most of this comes. See also InternetToughGuy, {{Troll}}, GarbagePostKid, ADarkerMe, BecameTheirOwnAntithesis, TheGadfly, and {{Griefer}} for specific forms of this, or any comment section. Compare to WhatYouAreInTheDark.


[[caption-width-right:350:some caption text]]


[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dickwad.png]]

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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dickwad.org/pmwiki/pub/images/dickwad_0.png]]


Added DiffLines:

[[caption-width-right:350:some caption text]]


This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The [[https://www.eff.org/about Electronic Frontier Foundation]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation has more info on them as well.]][[/labelnote]]

Sadly, this leads to a large number of people thinking that cyberbullying is funny, and that the Internet is the perfect place to spew all the bigoted, {{hypocrit|e}}ical, provocative, or otherwise hateful bile they would never say in-person. The GIFT also contributes to the pervasiveness of cyberbullying [[KidsAreCruel amongst young children]] [[TeensAreMonsters and teenagers]], which has led to [[DrivenToSuicide suicides]]. The academic name of the phenomenon is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_disinhibition_effect Online Disinhibition Effect]]. It should be noted that the Online Disinhibition Effect cuts both ways: While some people become jerks, other people discover that the anonymity and lack of consequence on the Internet allows them to be more honest and talk about issues which, under normal circumstances, they would be unable to address. These issues can be as simple as [[PeripheryDemographic liking a movie, show, or musician normally seen as outside their demographic]], as serious as mental health issues, or somewhere in the middle like an embarrassing sexual fetish. In any case, the exact same anonymity that turns some people into jerkasses allows them to discuss certain things that they might want to talk about but are unable to do normally out of fear of social stigma.

to:

This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world real-world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The [[https://www.eff.org/about Electronic Frontier Foundation]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation has more info on them as well.]][[/labelnote]]

Sadly, this leads to a large number of people thinking that cyberbullying is funny, and that the Internet is the perfect place to spew all the bigoted, {{hypocrit|e}}ical, provocative, or otherwise hateful bile they would never say in-person. The GIFT also contributes to the pervasiveness of cyberbullying [[KidsAreCruel amongst young children]] [[TeensAreMonsters and teenagers]], which has led to [[DrivenToSuicide suicides]]. The academic name of the phenomenon is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_disinhibition_effect Online Disinhibition Effect]]. It should be noted that the Online Disinhibition Effect cuts both ways: While some people become jerks, other people discover that the anonymity and lack of consequence on the Internet allows allow them to be more honest and talk about issues which, under normal circumstances, they would be unable to address. These issues can be as simple as [[PeripheryDemographic liking a movie, show, or musician normally seen as outside their demographic]], as serious as mental health issues, or somewhere in the middle like an embarrassing sexual fetish. In any case, the exact same anonymity that turns some people into jerkasses allows them to discuss certain things that they might want to talk about but are unable to do normally out of fear of social stigma.


The rise of social media networks such as Website/{{Facebook}} and comment sections, in which people may have to attach their real name and maybe even other details about themselves to any posts they make, has caused a re-evaluation of the theory. Plenty of people seem quite willing to act just as obnoxious, rude, bigoted, and abusive while posting under their real identity as they would if they were posting under a pseudonym. A lack of anonymity might dissuade some people from being jerks, but it does not appear to effectively push people into good behavior as was originally thought.

to:

The rise of social media networks such as Website/{{Facebook}} and comment sections, in which people may have to attach their real name and maybe even other details about themselves to any posts they make, has caused a re-evaluation of the theory. Plenty of people seem quite willing to act just as obnoxious, rude, bigoted, and abusive while posting under their real identity as they would if they were posting under a pseudonym. A lack of anonymity might dissuade some people from being jerks, but it does not appear to effectively push people into good behavior as was originally thought.
thought. This may be because while social media discourages anonymity, it also doesn't offer any real consequence.


[[caption-width-right:350:The Greater Internet Dickwad Theory]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:The Greater Internet Dickwad Theory]][[caption-width-right:350:[[CrapsackWorld Just an average day out on the Internet!]]]]


The Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory ("GIFT"), first [[TropeNamer given a name]] by ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'', is a theory that tries to explain why many people seem to become anti-social {{Jerkass}}es online in spite of any in-person behavior.

to:

The Greater Internet Fuckwad Theory ("GIFT"), ("[[FunWithAcronyms GIFT]]"), first [[TropeNamer given a name]] by ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'', is a theory that tries to explain why many people seem to become anti-social {{Jerkass}}es online in spite of any in-person behavior.


This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation has more info on them as well.]][[/labelnote]]

to:

This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.[[https://www.eff.org/about]] org/about Electronic Frontier Foundation]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation has more info on them as well.]][[/labelnote]]


This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. Wiki/{{The Other Wiki}} has more info on them as well[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]

Sadly, this leads to a large number of people thinking that cyberbullying is funny, and that the Internet is the perfect place to spew all the bigoted, {{hypocrit|e}}ical, provocative, or otherwise hateful bile they would never say in-person. The GIFT also contributes to the pervasiveness of cyberbullying [[KidsAreCruel amongst young children]] [[TeensAreMonsters and teenagers]], which has led to [[DrivenToSuicide suicides]]. The academic name of the phenomenon is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_disinhibition_effect Online Disinhibition Effect]]. It should be noted that the Online Disinhibition Effect cuts both ways: While some people become jerks, other people discover that the anonymity and lack of consequence on the Internet allows them to be more honest and talk about issues which, under normal circumstances, they would be unable to address. These issues can be as simple as [[PeripheryDemographic liking a movie, show, or musician normally seen as outside their demographic]], as serious as mental health issues, or somewhere in the middle like an embarrassing sexual fetish. In any case, the exact same anonymity that turns some people into jerkasses allows them to discuss certain things that they might want to talk about but are unable to do normally out of fear of social stigma.

to:

This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. Wiki/{{The [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki}} has more info on them as well[[https://en.Wiki]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]

org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation has more info on them as well.]][[/labelnote]]

Sadly, this leads to a large number of people thinking that cyberbullying is funny, and that the Internet is the perfect place to spew all the bigoted, {{hypocrit|e}}ical, provocative, or otherwise hateful bile they would never say in-person. The GIFT also contributes to the pervasiveness of cyberbullying [[KidsAreCruel amongst young children]] [[TeensAreMonsters and teenagers]], which has led to [[DrivenToSuicide suicides]]. The academic name of the phenomenon is the [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_disinhibition_effect Online Disinhibition Effect]]. It should be noted that the Online Disinhibition Effect cuts both ways: While some people become jerks, other people discover that the anonymity and lack of consequence on the Internet allows them to be more honest and talk about issues which, under normal circumstances, they would be unable to address. These issues can be as simple as [[PeripheryDemographic liking a movie, show, or musician normally seen as outside their demographic]], as serious as mental health issues, or somewhere in the middle like an embarrassing sexual fetish. In any case, the exact same anonymity that turns some people into jerkasses allows them to discuss certain things that they might want to talk about but are unable to do normally out of fear of social stigma.


This is a {{Subtrope}} to SeriousBusiness and InternetBackdraft. VocalMinority is from where most of this comes. See also InternetToughGuy, {{Troll}}, GarbagePostKid, ADarkerMe, BecameTheirOwnAntithesis, TheGadfly, and {{Griefer}} for specific forms of this, or any comment section. Compare to WhatYouAreInTheDark.

to:

This is a {{Subtrope}} to SeriousBusiness and InternetBackdraft.SeriousBusiness. VocalMinority is from where most of this comes. See also InternetToughGuy, {{Troll}}, GarbagePostKid, ADarkerMe, BecameTheirOwnAntithesis, TheGadfly, and {{Griefer}} for specific forms of this, or any comment section. Compare to WhatYouAreInTheDark.


This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. Wiki/{{TheOtherWiki}} has more info on them as well[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]

to:

This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. Wiki/{{TheOtherWiki}} Wiki/{{The Other Wiki}} has more info on them as well[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]


This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. TheOtherWiki has more info on them as well[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]

to:

This phenomenon has been studied in an academic setting; by all accounts, the comic's satirical analysis is spot-on: Normal people become more aggressive when they think their behavior carries no real world social consequences. When people do not have to worry about getting in trouble with their [[NeverLiveItDown loved ones, school, or place of employment]], or getting into [[TalkToTheFist a direct]] [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown physical altercation]] with anyone, they feel they have nothing to lose by being shameless, insufferable jerks behind the veil of anonymity that is TheInternet. [[labelnote:Although...]]''true'' anonymity is ''much'' more difficult to achieve. In fact, the illusion of anonymity can be extremely dangerous for giving people a false sense of security. Much of internet users' data and metadata is actually quite accessible, and many times, unwittingly so; IP addresses and other identifying information can be found using relatively basic tools by people with nefarious intent. Add to it that many active users on social media platforms will often give out their own information without realizing the potential consequences, and you have a recipe for disaster. True anonymity requires a lot of active privacy, threat modeling with cybersecurity, discretion with sharing information, and an overall change in lifestyle habits in general. Many organizations are privacy-oriented and encourage this kind of thing. The Electronic Frontier Foundation[[https://www.eff.org/about]] is one such organization that encourages anonymity, and definitely a good place to start if you want to be more secure. TheOtherWiki Wiki/{{TheOtherWiki}} has more info on them as well[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_Frontier_Foundation]].[[/labelnote]]

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