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In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_traditional_rulers although it does have traditional ceremonial "princes"]] (not that the mark would be expected to know that either).

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In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, code, since believe it or not this ''is'' a crime in Nigeria. However, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_traditional_rulers although it does have traditional ceremonial "princes"]] (not that the mark would be expected to know that either).


* In ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'', if you took the PDA from Larry Kaczynski, one of his messages contains a 419 scam written by a certain "John Okonkwo" (included in this link [[https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/pc/672365-doom-3-bfg-edition/faqs/31621 here]].

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'', if you took the PDA from Larry Kaczynski, one of his messages contains a 419 scam written by a certain "John Okonkwo" (included in this link [[https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/pc/672365-doom-3-bfg-edition/faqs/31621 here]].here]]).

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Doom 3}}'', if you took the PDA from Larry Kaczynski, one of his messages contains a 419 scam written by a certain "John Okonkwo" (included in this link [[https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/pc/672365-doom-3-bfg-edition/faqs/31621 here]].

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* The ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "Scammed Yankees" centers on Carter and Peter falling for this scam.


The advance fee fraud, known colloquially as the '''419 scam''', is a form of Internet fraud commonly associated with UsefulNotes/{{Nigeria}} (hence its alternative name, the Nigerian scam). The character is contacted by someone who claims (in [[DelusionsOfEloquence suspiciously shaky English]]) to have a large sum of money which is rightfully his but which he cannot access for various reasons (sealed account, locked trust fund, etc.), and he needs the mark's help to be able to access it. If he helps out, he'll get a substantial share of the money, which could be millions of dollars. To do this, the scammer typically needs the mark's own bank account to help him transfer the money, and he needs some of the mark's own money in advance to help authorize the transfer, bribe officials, or do anything else the scammer can think of. But the money doesn't exist; once the scammer gets the mark's money or access to his bank account, he cuts off all contact. It's basically the SpanishPrisoner scam for the Internet age.

As a trope, though, it's not usually used as a way to drive the overall plot like the SpanishPrisoner scam is; instead, it usually goes to show how stupid or gullible a character is for falling for it. The subversion would thus take the form of the money being real and the other characters being the fools for being too cynical to help out a poor Nigerian prince. A particularly clever character might become a "scambaiter", who pretends to fall for the scam and strings the scammer along until he gets him into a humiliating or compromising situation.

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The advance fee fraud, known colloquially as the '''419 scam''', is a form of Internet fraud commonly associated with UsefulNotes/{{Nigeria}} (hence its alternative name, the Nigerian scam). The character is contacted by someone who claims (in [[DelusionsOfEloquence suspiciously shaky English]]) to have a large sum of money which is rightfully his but which he cannot access for various reasons (sealed account, locked trust fund, etc.), and he needs the mark's help to be able to access it. If he helps out, he'll get a substantial share of the money, which could be millions of dollars. To do this, the scammer typically needs the mark's own bank account to help him transfer the money, and he needs some of the mark's own money in advance to help authorize the transfer, bribe officials, or do anything else the scammer can think of. But the money doesn't exist; once the scammer gets the mark's money or access to his bank account, he cuts off all contact. It's basically the SpanishPrisoner "Spanish Prisoner" scam for the Internet age.

As a trope, though, it's not usually used as a way to drive the overall plot like the SpanishPrisoner Spanish Prisoner scam is; instead, it usually goes to show how stupid or gullible a character is for falling for it. The subversion would thus take the form of the money being real and the other characters being the fools for being too cynical to help out a poor Nigerian prince. A particularly clever character might become a "scambaiter", who pretends to fall for the scam and strings the scammer along until he gets him into a humiliating or compromising situation.


* In ''VideoGame/HypnospaceOutlaw'', a Hypnospace user sends the player character an e-mail. He claims that a rich person will grant him a submarine if he gathers enough Hypnocoin in time, which would allow him to hunt for treasure that he'd really share with the donors. [[spoiler:He ends up being serious.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/HypnospaceOutlaw'', a Hypnospace user sends the player character an e-mail. He claims that a rich person will grant him a submarine if he gathers enough Hypnocoin [[FictionalCurrency Hypnocoin]] in time, which would allow him to hunt for treasure that he'd really share with the donors. [[spoiler:He ends [[spoiler:He's serious. If you choose to donate to him, he actually acquires a submarine and sets off to find the treasure; he posts his coordinates to Hypnospace, which end up being serious.his last known location before going missing.]]


* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' had ''Music/KatyPerry'' as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.

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* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' had ''Music/KatyPerry'' Music/KatyPerry as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.


[[caption-width-right:350:{{Meanwhile|Scene}}...[[note]]https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nigeria_83.png[[/note]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:{{Meanwhile|Scene}}...[[note]]https://static.[[caption-width-right:350:An uncommon case of Bart applying some common sense.[[labelnote:Meanwhile...]]https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nigeria_83.png[[/note]]]]
png[[/labelnote]]]]


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* Manages to reach ''Equestria'' in ''[[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/109516/dear-friend Dear Friend]]'', within the [[Fanfic/TriptychContinuum Triptych Continuum]]. Spike fires off a series of ersatz scrolls after ingesting some "griffon-made canned lunch meat", one of which is clearly based on a classic 419. It involves the previously-unsuspected son of Sombra, twenty million bits deposited in Ponyville, and a request to help free the money so it can be used for retaking the homeland after the actions of the maniacal Preencess Celestia and the knownownown insane killer unicorn, Twilight Sparkle. (The scroll is filled with similar errors, including "horsepital" and "proponysal".) And just to top it off, it's signed "Sucker Bet".

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* Manages to reach ''Equestria'' in ''[[http://www.fimfiction.net/story/109516/dear-friend Dear Friend]]'', Friend,]]'' within the [[Fanfic/TriptychContinuum Triptych Continuum]]. Spike fires off a series of ersatz scrolls after ingesting some "griffon-made canned lunch meat", one of which is clearly based on a classic 419. It involves the previously-unsuspected son of Sombra, twenty million bits deposited in Ponyville, and a request to help free the money so it can be used for retaking the homeland after the actions of the maniacal Preencess Celestia and the knownownown insane killer unicorn, Twilight Sparkle. (The scroll is filled with similar errors, including "horsepital" and "proponysal".) And just to top it off, it's signed "Sucker Bet".


* A strip from ''Webcomic/RealLifeComics'' has Greg Dean looking through his email, which is full of these scams. The email is asking for a monetary donation because the daughter (or other relation) of the sender is suffering from [[SoapOperaDisease some terminal illness]]. Except with each scam email he reads, the sickness gets progressively less severe and the asking amount for the donation progressively more, with the last one asking for a $100 donation for a cold.

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* A strip from ''Webcomic/RealLifeComics'' has Greg Mae Dean looking through his her email, which is full of these scams. The email is asking for a monetary donation because the daughter (or other relation) of the sender is suffering from [[SoapOperaDisease some terminal illness]]. Except with each scam email he she reads, the sickness gets progressively less severe and the asking amount for the donation progressively more, with the last one asking for a $100 donation for a cold.


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[[folder:FanFic]]
[[folder:Fan Works]]


* ''419'' by Will Ferguson is named after and centres on one of these scams. Laura Curtis' father, Henry, dies in a car crash after getting ensnared in one, and she goes to Nigeria looking to bring the perpetrator to justice. [[spoiler:Said perpetrator was taught to try to exploit latent or active WhiteGuilt in his targets, but they [[StrawHypocrite don't even believe it]].]]

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* ''419'' by Will Ferguson is named after and centres centers on one of these scams. Laura Curtis' father, Henry, dies in a car crash after getting ensnared in one, and she goes to Nigeria looking to bring the perpetrator to justice. [[spoiler:Said perpetrator was taught to try to exploit latent or active WhiteGuilt in his targets, but they [[StrawHypocrite don't even believe it]].]]


* [[http://xkcd.com/1777/ This]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' strip has an odd example, in that Black Hat Guy is writing one to his own diary.

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* *''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'':
**
[[http://xkcd.com/1777/ This]] ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'' strip has an odd example, in that Black Hat Guy is writing one to his own diary.diary.
** [[https://xkcd.com/1948/ A series of political fundraising e-mails]] ends with one which claims to be from a Nigerian prince who is running for Congress.


In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_traditional_rulers although does have traditional ceremonial "princes"]] (not that the mark would be expected to know that either).

to:

In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_traditional_rulers although it does have traditional ceremonial "princes"]] (not that the mark would be expected to know that either).

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