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As a trope, though, it's not usually used as a way to drive the overall plot like the SpanishPrisoner scam is; instead, it usually goes to show how a stupid or gullible a character is for falling for it. The subversion would thus take the form of the money being real and the other characters being the fools for being too cynical to help out a poor Nigerian prince. A particularly clever character might become a "scambaiter", who pretends to fall for the scam and strings the scammer along until he gets him into a humiliating or compromising situation.

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As a trope, though, it's not usually used as a way to drive the overall plot like the SpanishPrisoner scam is; instead, it usually goes to show how a stupid or gullible a character is for falling for it. The subversion would thus take the form of the money being real and the other characters being the fools for being too cynical to help out a poor Nigerian prince. A particularly clever character might become a "scambaiter", who pretends to fall for the scam and strings the scammer along until he gets him into a humiliating or compromising situation.

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* The series WebVideo/{{Scamalot}} is about its host James' response to such scams.


* Many scambaiting sites have publishing sections where scambaiters regale their exploits, including:
** [[http://www.419eater.com/html/letters.htm 419]][[http://forum.419eater.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=10 Eater]]
** [[http://sweetchillisauce.com/nigeria.html Sweet Chilli Sauce]]
** [[http://www.scamorama.com/ Scam-o-Rama]]

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* Many scambaiting sites have publishing sections where scambaiters regale their exploits, including:
**
including [[http://www.419eater.com/html/letters.htm 419]][[http://forum.419 Eater]] (and its [[http://forum.419eater.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=10 Eater]]
**
forum]]), [[http://sweetchillisauce.com/nigeria.html Sweet Chilli Sauce]]
**
Sauce]] and [[http://www.scamorama.com/ Scam-o-Rama]]Scam-o-Rama]]. Some of the exploits go enough into seemingly DisproportionateRetribution that scambaiters have to remind readers that their targets are criminals to dispel any feelings of pity for them.


The advance fee fraud, known colloquially as the '''419 scam''', is a form of Internet fraud commonly associated with UsefulNotes/{{Nigeria}}. The character is contacted by someone who claims (in [[DelusionsOfEloquence suspiciously shaky English]]) to have a large sum of money which is rightfully his but which he cannot access for various reasons (sealed account, locked trust fund, etc.), and he needs the mark's help to be able to access it. If he helps out, he'll get a substantial share of the money, which could be millions of dollars. To do this, the scammer typically needs the mark's own bank account to help him transfer the money, and he needs some of the mark's own money in advance to help authorize the transfer, bribe officials, or do anything else the scammer can think of. But the money doesn't exist; once the scammer gets the mark's money or access to his bank account, he cuts off all contact. It's basically the SpanishPrisoner scam for the Internet age.

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The advance fee fraud, known colloquially as the '''419 scam''', is a form of Internet fraud commonly associated with UsefulNotes/{{Nigeria}}.UsefulNotes/{{Nigeria}} (hence its alternative name, the Nigerian scam). The character is contacted by someone who claims (in [[DelusionsOfEloquence suspiciously shaky English]]) to have a large sum of money which is rightfully his but which he cannot access for various reasons (sealed account, locked trust fund, etc.), and he needs the mark's help to be able to access it. If he helps out, he'll get a substantial share of the money, which could be millions of dollars. To do this, the scammer typically needs the mark's own bank account to help him transfer the money, and he needs some of the mark's own money in advance to help authorize the transfer, bribe officials, or do anything else the scammer can think of. But the money doesn't exist; once the scammer gets the mark's money or access to his bank account, he cuts off all contact. It's basically the SpanishPrisoner scam for the Internet age.

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* In ''Literature/JesusOnThyFace'', Jesus receives a message from the son of a former deceased president who knows the location of King Solomon's Mines and needs someone to help him assist in transferring the funds.


* A sketch on ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' had three wealthy brothers phoning up members of the public to give them a free "''massive'' yacht," provided they paid off a few legal fees. Naturally, they were quite confused that nobody was interested in their free yachts despite their "warm and reassuring" voices and the insignificance of the legal fees when compared to the value of a ''massive'' yacht.

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* A sketch on ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' had three wealthy brothers phoning up members of the public to give them a free "''massive'' yacht," provided they paid off a few legal fees. Naturally, they were quite confused that nobody was interested in their free yachts despite their "warm and reassuring" (that is: robotic and automated-sounding) voices and the insignificance of the legal fees when compared to the value of a ''massive'' yacht.yacht.
** In a later episode, the same characters were excited to give the millionth visitor to their website a free ''massive'' yacht, but since the popup link they personally sent looked suspiciously like a scam this too was rejected, much to their shock.


* ‘’Series/HowIMetYourMother’’ had ‘’Music/KatyPerry’’ as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.

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* ‘’Series/HowIMetYourMother’’ ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' had ‘’Music/KatyPerry’’ ''Music/KatyPerry'' as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.


* In one episode of ''Blog/TextsFromSuperheroes'', [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor]] [[http://textsfromsuperheroes.com/image/126467709993 falls for one]].

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* In one episode of ''Blog/TextsFromSuperheroes'', [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor]] [[http://textsfromsuperheroes.com/image/126467709993 com/post/178805902427/prince falls for one]].


* ‘’Series/HowIMetYourMother’’ had ‘’Creator/KatyPerry’’ as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.

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* ‘’Series/HowIMetYourMother’’ had ‘’Creator/KatyPerry’’ ‘’Music/KatyPerry’’ as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.

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* ‘’Series/HowIMetYourMother’’ had ‘’Creator/KatyPerry’’ as a guest star who played an extremely gullible girl who fell for one of these.


* In the episode "Danger Games", Piper was determined to get $1,000 after receiving an email claiming to be from the Prince of Yerba who would give them $1 million in exchange for their help. However, this became a subversion of the trope as scam was actually revealed to be real and Piper's nemesis Jana gave the prince the money, leading to the two of them dating.


In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this).

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In RealLife, the term "419 scam" derives from the relevant section of the Nigerian criminal code; however, it's used to refer to all scams of this kind, even when they don't involve Nigeria or bank accounts at all. The RealLife workings of this trope are explained in greater detail on the [[Analysis/FourOneNineScam Analysis page]]. But to be a trope, it helps to use shorthand, and that's why it nearly always involves a Nigerian with a big bank account he can't access. This Nigerian is also often a prince, even though Nigeria is a republic and not a monarchy (not that the mark would be expected to know this).
this), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigerian_traditional_rulers although it actually does have traditional ceremonial "princes"]] (not that the mark would be expected to know that either).

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* In the episode "Danger Games", Piper was determined to get $1,000 after receiving an email claiming to be from the Prince of Yerba who would give them $1 million in exchange for their help. However, this became a subversion of the trope as scam was actually revealed to be real and Piper's nemesis Jana gave the prince the money, leading to the two of them dating.


* Michael Scott on ''Series/TheOffice'' has been mentioned to support "about twenty Nigerian princesses".

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* Michael Scott on ''Series/TheOffice'' ''Series/{{The Office|US}}'' has been mentioned to support "about twenty Nigerian princesses".

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* In one of the ''[[Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo Grantville Gazette]]'' short stories, this scam is applied against members of minor nobility by some who were familiar with it from uptime 20th century literature, with said nobility being too concerned about their reputation to try to assist catching the perpetrator.

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