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* '''The comic book anthology series''': This type of comic book featured multiple genres and art styles waned during the 1940s and 1950s and finally died by the mid-1960s, both because the massive size of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks was no longer viable and because publishers began to realize that single-genre comics were more marketable. Prior to this shift, however, the standard practice was to present short eight-to-ten-page stories, usually a few superhero features, a few pulp-inspired civilian adventurer characters, and various humor strips. When characters like ComicBook/{{Superman}} and ComicBook/{{Batman}} got self-titled comics featuring only their adventures, the comics still featured multiple short stories about those characters rather than one long story. As late as the mid-1960s, Creator/DCComics still tended to present two stories of the star character in its superhero titles, as well as one or two half-page, usually crudely-drawn gag strip features. By UsefulNotes/{{the Bronze Age|OfComicBooks}}, however, this format was was abandoned.

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* '''The comic book anthology series''': This type of comic book featured multiple genres and art styles waned during the 1940s and 1950s and finally died by the mid-1960s, both because the massive size of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks was no longer viable and because publishers began to realize that single-genre comics were more marketable. Prior to this shift, however, the standard practice was to present short eight-to-ten-page stories, usually a few superhero features, a few pulp-inspired civilian adventurer characters, and various humor strips. When characters like ComicBook/{{Superman}} and ComicBook/{{Batman}} got self-titled comics featuring only their adventures, the comics still featured multiple short stories about those characters rather than one long story. As late as the mid-1960s, Creator/DCComics still tended to present two stories of the star character in its superhero titles, as well as one or two half-page, usually crudely-drawn gag strip features. By UsefulNotes/{{the Bronze Age|OfComicBooks}}, however, this format was was abandoned.



** Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie referenced it in their Internet Help Desk skit, as a character they call the [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Twelve o'Clock Flasher]]:
--->'''Wes:''' "We've got a serious Twelve o'Clock Flasher here. All the appliances in his house are always flashing twelve. It's impossible to get a Twelve o'Clock Flasher online, it ''can't be done!'' I've seen people eat their own headsets trying!"

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** Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie referenced it in their Internet Help Desk skit, as a character they call the [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant Twelve o'Clock O'clock Flasher]]:
--->'''Wes:''' "We've got a serious Twelve o'Clock O'clock Flasher here. All the appliances in his house are always flashing twelve. It's impossible to get a Twelve o'Clock O'clock Flasher online, it ''can't be done!'' I've seen people eat their own headsets trying!"



** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E19LisasWedding Lisa's Wedding]]" that take place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture the far of future]] of 2010 has a quick gag where we see that the Big Ben has replaced its analogue face with an digital one... blinking at 12:00.

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** ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The episode "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E19LisasWedding Lisa's Wedding]]" that take place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture the far of off future]] of 2010 has a quick gag where we see that the Big Ben has replaced its analogue face with an digital one... blinking at 12:00.


* '''The officer fallen on hard times''': The British army commissioned a lot of officers from outside of the traditional officer class during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and after the war most of these men had to return to their former stations in life. This was a popular character type in post-war British fiction, but most of those novels are now forgotten, with one of the few exceptions being ''Literature/LadyChatterleysLover'', in which Mellors the gamekeeper is a former officer. An example set earlier, but written more recently, would be [[Literature/AubreyMaturin Jack Aubrey]] whenever peace breaks out.

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* '''The officer fallen on hard times''': The British army commissioned a lot of officers from outside of the traditional officer class during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, and after the war most of these men had to return to their former stations in life. This was a popular character type in post-war British fiction, but most of those novels are now forgotten, with one of the few exceptions being ''Literature/LadyChatterleysLover'', in which Mellors the gamekeeper is a former officer. An example set earlier, but written more recently, would be [[Literature/AubreyMaturin Napoleonic-era naval officers ([[Literature/AubreyMaturin Jack Aubrey]] Aubrey]], Literature/HoratioHornblower) whenever peace breaks out.


-->'''Mary:''' Give me back my maid!
-->'''Dick:''' I'm sorry, Mary, but Cathy is not some product to be bought or sold on the open market. She is a living, breathing human being with feelings, thoughts, and emotions -- you don't own her. ''[beat]'' I do!

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-->'''Mary:''' --->'''Mary:''' Give me back my maid!
-->'''Dick:''' --->'''Dick:''' I'm sorry, Mary, but Cathy is not some product to be bought or sold on the open market. She is a living, breathing human being with feelings, thoughts, and emotions -- you don't own her. ''[beat]'' I do!



-->'''Tyrion:''' Wars haven been started for less.

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-->'''Tyrion:''' --->'''Tyrion:''' Wars haven been started for less.




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** The trope held on long enough to make it into the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Bewitched}}'', where actual magic is necessary to get a table lighter to work.
--->'''Darrin:''' I have yet to see a table lighter that works. ''[poof]''



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** In "3 Scenes Plus a Tag from a Marriage" episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', we see that Homer and Marge lived in a fifth-floor walk-up before marrying. When asked by Bart, Homer replies he took the elevator... on the building across the street, crawling to his building through a plank.


* '''Inferior Japanese products ''': For a few years after World War II, there was the stereotype that any product made in Japan was very cheap and of poor quality. We can see this trope was alive as late as the 70's, (e.g., Miles Monroe shouting "Goddamn Japanese model!" in ''Film/{{Sleeper}}''). This is even referenced in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartIII'', where 1955 Doc Brown doesn't seem surprised when a circuit failed since it was made in Japan (Marty then makes it clear that in his time, the best products are actually made in Japan; words that truly shock Doc Brown). Around the 80's, and thanks to its economic rise, this image changed, and cutting-edge technology and high quality are usually what anyone thinks about Japanese products. Sure, maybe the idea of JapanTakesOverTheWorld was a li'l too much, but it is still regarded as a super-power that excels in a lot of industries, specially cars and electronic devices.

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* '''Inferior Japanese products ''': products''': For a few years after World War II, there was the stereotype that any product made in Japan was very cheap and of poor quality. We can see this trope was alive as late as the 70's, (e.g., Miles Monroe shouting "Goddamn Japanese model!" in ''Film/{{Sleeper}}''). This is even referenced in ''Film/BackToTheFuturePartIII'', where 1955 Doc Brown doesn't seem surprised when a circuit failed since it was made in Japan (Marty then makes it clear that in his time, the best products are actually made in Japan; words that truly shock Doc Brown). Around the 80's, and thanks to its economic rise, this image changed, and cutting-edge technology and high quality are usually what anyone thinks about Japanese products. Sure, maybe the idea of JapanTakesOverTheWorld was a li'l too much, but it is still regarded as a super-power that excels in a lot of industries, specially cars and electronic devices.



* '''All Old Folks Like Series/{{Matlock}}''': a common joke in sitcoms and stand-up routines was to make fun of how old people like that show. Of course, nowadays is hard to find anyone not only using the joke, but even remembering the show at all. FridgeBrilliance: The elderly audience for the show in the 1990's are mostly dead now.

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* '''All Old Folks Like Series/{{Matlock}}''': a A common joke in sitcoms and stand-up routines was to make fun of how old people like that show. Of course, nowadays is hard to find anyone not only using the joke, but even remembering the show at all. FridgeBrilliance: The elderly audience for the show in the 1990's are mostly dead now.



* '''Surrogate Cool Big Brother''' characters in anime and manga, that is, older characters who hung around with younger characters who weren't necessarily related to them, but went on exciting adventures with them anyway, were fairly big in the early days of Shonen demographic manga as well as some tokusatsu, such as Goro and Hiroshi in Film/GodzillaVsMegalon. This trope was killed for twofold reasons: The changing family dynamic in Japanese culture after the 70s were over, and the fact that adult men hanging around child characters in dangerous situations constantly is [[PaedoHunt frowned upon heavily]]. In addition, the character dynamics of many, such as the aforementioned Goro and Hiroshi, [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation simply leads modern audiences]] to think that the "big bros" are simply [[HoYay a gay couple with an adopted child.]] If this ever shows up in a modern work, expect the [[AdorablyPrecociousChild kid to be more mature]] [[ManChild than the adult(s)]].

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* '''Surrogate Cool Big Brother''' characters Brother''': Characters in anime and manga, that is, older characters who hung around with younger characters who weren't necessarily related to them, but went on exciting adventures with them anyway, were fairly big in the early days of Shonen demographic manga as well as some tokusatsu, such as Goro and Hiroshi in Film/GodzillaVsMegalon. This trope was killed for twofold reasons: The changing family dynamic in Japanese culture after the 70s were over, and the fact that adult men hanging around child characters in dangerous situations constantly is [[PaedoHunt frowned upon heavily]]. In addition, the character dynamics of many, such as the aforementioned Goro and Hiroshi, [[AlternateCharacterInterpretation simply leads modern audiences]] to think that the "big bros" are simply [[HoYay a gay couple with an adopted child.]] If this ever shows up in a modern work, expect the [[AdorablyPrecociousChild kid to be more mature]] [[ManChild than the adult(s)]].



* '''Gay Men ''Really'' Love Their Mommies'''. In pop culture of decades past, there was a perceived correlation between a man being gay and having a very unhealthy attachment to his mother. Best seen in the novelization and a deleted scene from the movie of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'', where Marty, anticipating what might happen on his date with Lorraine, fears it might turn him gay ([[HaveAGayOldTime the punchline being the Doc being clueless about that usage of the term]]). The 1990s changed this perception, with really late examples in 1993's ''The Powers That Be'', in which the senator's illegitimate daughter, upon learning that a guest likes long walks on the beach with his mother, immediately asks if he's gay, and an episode of ''Series/BlackBooks'' from 2000 where Fran, on a date with a closeted gay man, uses the fact that he calls his mother frequently as supporting evidence of his homosexuality. Now, this trope is so far forgotten that the writer of [[http://www.cracked.com/article_22820_6-inappropriate-moments-wisely-cut-from-famous-movies_p2.html this]] {{Website/Cracked}} article expresses genuine confusion in his discussion of the deleted scene.

* '''The Check is in the Mail'''. Once a valid excuse as to why a debt for loan or service has not been paid, it later evolved into jokes about said excuses. The joke was, of course, "the mail is slow, blame them". As [[TechnologyMarchesOn technology improved]], however, money orders and certified checks replacing ordinary checks, and then direct bank deposits and internet buying became more popular, not to mention options other than the regular post office. The joke is almost never used now.

* '''New fathers''' pacing anxiously in the waiting room as their wives are in labor and delivery. Most new fathers are right in there beside Mama these days, watching it happen. Also, no more gazing through the big glass window, with all the other new fathers, asking each other "Which one is yours?" Modern hospitals room the little sweeties in with the mothers, where dads and grandparents can visit. Only babies needing special care stay in the nursery, and for security and privacy reasons, viewing of the newborn nursery is no longer open to outsiders.

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* '''Gay Men ''Really'' Love Their Mommies'''. Mommies''': In pop culture of decades past, there was a perceived correlation between a man being gay and having a very unhealthy attachment to his mother. Best seen in the novelization and a deleted scene from the movie of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'', where Marty, anticipating what might happen on his date with Lorraine, fears it might turn him gay ([[HaveAGayOldTime the punchline being the Doc being clueless about that usage of the term]]). The 1990s changed this perception, with really late examples in 1993's ''The Powers That Be'', in which the senator's illegitimate daughter, upon learning that a guest likes long walks on the beach with his mother, immediately asks if he's gay, and an episode of ''Series/BlackBooks'' from 2000 where Fran, on a date with a closeted gay man, uses the fact that he calls his mother frequently as supporting evidence of his homosexuality. Now, this trope is so far forgotten that the writer of [[http://www.cracked.com/article_22820_6-inappropriate-moments-wisely-cut-from-famous-movies_p2.html this]] {{Website/Cracked}} article expresses genuine confusion in his discussion of the deleted scene.

* '''The Check is in the Mail'''. Mail''': Once a valid excuse as to why a debt for loan or service has not been paid, it later evolved into jokes about said excuses. The joke was, of course, "the mail is slow, blame them". As [[TechnologyMarchesOn technology improved]], however, money orders and certified checks replacing ordinary checks, and then direct bank deposits and internet buying became more popular, not to mention options other than the regular post office. The joke is almost never used now.

* '''New fathers''' pacing fathers''': Pacing anxiously in the waiting room as their wives are in labor and delivery. Most new fathers are right in there beside Mama these days, watching it happen. Also, no more gazing through the big glass window, with all the other new fathers, asking each other "Which one is yours?" Modern hospitals room the little sweeties in with the mothers, where dads and grandparents can visit. Only babies needing special care stay in the nursery, and for security and privacy reasons, viewing of the newborn nursery is no longer open to outsiders.


** The play's plot overview (a rugged American is positively contrasted with continental [[UpperClassTwit Upper Class Twits]]) also counts as a forgotten trope - european writers would applaud American egalitarianism and free-spiritedness (the title character is the hero of the story, and his LoveInterest romanticizes life in New England during a monologue). This trope was killed around the time american writers such as Creator/FScottFitzgerald described american class prejudices in the [=1920ies].

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** The play's plot overview (a rugged American is positively contrasted with continental [[UpperClassTwit Upper Class Twits]]) also counts as a forgotten trope - european writers would applaud American egalitarianism and free-spiritedness (the title character is the hero of the story, and his LoveInterest romanticizes life in New England during a monologue). This trope was killed around the time american writers such as Creator/FScottFitzgerald described american class prejudices in the [=1920ies].
[=1920ies=].



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** The play's plot overview (a rugged American is positively contrasted with continental [[UpperClassTwit Upper Class Twits]]) also counts as a forgotten trope - european writers would applaud American egalitarianism and free-spiritedness (the title character is the hero of the story, and his LoveInterest romanticizes life in New England during a monologue). This trope was killed around the time american writers such as Creator/FScottFitzgerald described american class prejudices in the [=1920ies].



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** ''Film/KingKong2005'' is a rare modern example, and only because of the homage to the original ''Film/KingKong''.



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** [[Series/FawltyTowers Basil Fawlty]] excuses his wife Sybil's [[AnnoyingLaugh giggling]] by claiming "I'm afraid her local finishing school was bombed."


* '''Invasion literature''': A popular British sub-genre of ScienceFiction (not named as such at that point) in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. This genre focused on the invasion of Britain TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (or earlier) by a foreign power. This foreign power was most often either France or Germany, depending on which seemed Britain's most likely enemy at the time. Its mainstream incarnation vanished during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, presumably because they had ''actual'' wars with Germany.

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* '''Invasion literature''': A popular British sub-genre of ScienceFiction (not named as such at that point) in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras. This genre focused on the invasion of Britain TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture (or earlier) by a foreign power. This foreign power was most often either France or Germany, depending on which seemed Britain's most likely enemy at the time. Its mainstream incarnation vanished during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, presumably because they had ''actual'' wars with Germany. There are occasional not-explicitly-science fiction examples of the genre afterwards, such as ''Film/RedDawn'', but the [[GenreKiller proliferation of nuclear weapons has more or less made direct armed invasions of first-world countries obsolete]], so [[VoodooShark such stories have to a lot of explaining to do]].


** With the advent of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} and {{Film}} they morphed into Travelogues and travel programs, Up-Close-With-Wildlife programs, and Nature Documentaries
** Even when those were most popular in the 19th century (see Creator/JulesVerne works), Creator/EdgarAllanPoe wrote a StealthParody (''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'') to mock the credulous readers.

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** With the advent of {{UsefulNotes/Television}} and {{Film}} they morphed into Travelogues and travel programs, Up-Close-With-Wildlife programs, and Nature Documentaries
Documentaries.
** Quite a few of them, such as ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Mandeville The Travels of Sir John Mandeville]]'', were seen as [[VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory somewhere between wild exaggeration and outright nonsense]] even in the fourteenth century, and slowly fell out of favour as [[ScienceMarchesOn Europeans became capable of easily traveling or corresponding with distant places]]. Even when those the more serious ones were most popular in the 19th century (see Creator/JulesVerne works), Creator/EdgarAllanPoe wrote a StealthParody (''Literature/TheNarrativeOfArthurGordonPymOfNantucket'') to mock the credulous readers.


* '''Gay Men ''Really'' Love Their Mommies'''. In pop culture of decades past, there was a perceived correlation between a man being gay and having a very unhealthy attachment to his mother. Best seen in the novelization and a deleted scene from the movie of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'', where Marty, anticipating what might happen on his date with Lorraine, fears it might turn him gay (the punchline being the Doc being clueless about that usage of the term). The 1990s changed this perception, with really late examples in 1993's ''The Powers That Be'', in which the senator's illegitimate daughter, upon learning that a guest likes long walks on the beach with his mother, immediately asks if he's gay, and an episode of ''Series/BlackBooks'' from 2000 where Fran, on a date with a closeted gay man, uses the fact that he calls his mother frequently as supporting evidence of his homosexuality. Now, this trope is so far forgotten that the writer of [[http://www.cracked.com/article_22820_6-inappropriate-moments-wisely-cut-from-famous-movies_p2.html this]] {{Website/Cracked}} article expresses genuine confusion in his discussion of the deleted scene.

to:

* '''Gay Men ''Really'' Love Their Mommies'''. In pop culture of decades past, there was a perceived correlation between a man being gay and having a very unhealthy attachment to his mother. Best seen in the novelization and a deleted scene from the movie of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'', where Marty, anticipating what might happen on his date with Lorraine, fears it might turn him gay (the ([[HaveAGayOldTime the punchline being the Doc being clueless about that usage of the term).term]]). The 1990s changed this perception, with really late examples in 1993's ''The Powers That Be'', in which the senator's illegitimate daughter, upon learning that a guest likes long walks on the beach with his mother, immediately asks if he's gay, and an episode of ''Series/BlackBooks'' from 2000 where Fran, on a date with a closeted gay man, uses the fact that he calls his mother frequently as supporting evidence of his homosexuality. Now, this trope is so far forgotten that the writer of [[http://www.cracked.com/article_22820_6-inappropriate-moments-wisely-cut-from-famous-movies_p2.html this]] {{Website/Cracked}} article expresses genuine confusion in his discussion of the deleted scene.



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** A similar mentality used to persist regarding {{game show}}s, but a more youthful approach to the genre over the years (glitzier sets, younger and/or more attractive hosts, physically and/or mentally demanding gameplay formats conducive to 20- to 30-something contestants) has helped put this trope to rest. Also helping was the rise of game shows targeted at children, most notably ''Series/{{Double Dare|1986}}''.


** The 2011-2017 BBC2/Showtime comedy, 'Episodes,' is a show about writing scripts for Hollywood and it's theme starts the show with a jaunty tune backed by typewriter noises. Interludes are also frequently bumped with typewriter sounds, such as typing, dinging bells, and ratcheting.

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** The 2011-2017 BBC2/Showtime comedy, 'Episodes,' [=BBC2=]/Showtime comedy ''Episodes'' is a show about writing scripts for Hollywood and it's its theme starts the show with a jaunty tune backed by typewriter noises. Interludes are also frequently bumped with typewriter sounds, such as typing, dinging bells, and ratcheting.

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