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* After showing how women are underestimated at best and treated as sex slaves, brood mares and bargaining chips at worst, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' gets this tinge in its 6th season, in the form of WomenAreWiser. Almost all factions (King's Landing, the Reach, Dorne, the Iron Islands, Meereen) have come to be headed by strong, competent (at least [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen sometimes]]) female rulers (Cersei, Olenna, Ellaria, Daenerys) while the men who had previously held these positions have failed one way or another. The one faction that has a man at its throne (the North) owes its existence to Sansa Stark more than it does to its king Jon who almost got himself and his men killed and would have lost without Sansa's diplomatic skill. Even previously competent male leaders like Tyrion and Jon have turned into GeneralFailure and make a mess for the women to clean up. Women such as Brienne, Arya and Lyanna Mormont, if not queens in their own right, acquit themselves better than most men do at this point.

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* After showing how women are underestimated at best and treated as sex slaves, brood mares and bargaining chips at worst, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' gets this tinge in its 6th season, in the form of WomenAreWiser. Almost all factions (King's Landing, the Reach, Dorne, the Iron Islands, Meereen) have come to be headed by strong, competent (at least [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen sometimes]]) female rulers (Cersei, Olenna, Ellaria, Daenerys) while the men who had previously held these positions have failed one way or another. The one faction that has a man at its throne (the North) owes its existence to Sansa Stark more than it does to its king Jon who almost got himself and his men killed and would have lost without Sansa's diplomatic skill. Even previously competent male leaders like Tyrion and Jon have turned into GeneralFailure and make a mess for the women to clean up. Women such as Brienne, Arya and Lyanna Mormont, if not queens in their own right, acquit themselves better than most men do at this point. It eventually ends up being subverted by the end. Ellaria is last seen rotting in the dungeon after being defeated by Balon Greyjoy and losing her daughters, while Olenna is given the chance to commit suicide after being defeated by Jaime's forces. Most controversially, [[spoiler:Daenerys ends up JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope, going on a rampage through King's Landing and killing thousands of innocent people, not just Cersei. Jon is ultimately forced to kill Daenerys, resulting in only two female rulers remaining- Yara Greyjoy ruling over the Ironborn and Sansa as Queen in the North, and both largely got the positions by virtue of no one else being eligible for them.]]


* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show, Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, the female characters are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the male characters having to carry the scene. [[spoiler: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]


* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, the female characters are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the male characters having to carry the scene. [[spoiler: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]

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* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , show, Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, the female characters are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the male characters having to carry the scene. [[spoiler: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]


* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, the female characters are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the male characters having to carry the scene. [[spoilers: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]

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* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, the female characters are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the male characters having to carry the scene. [[spoilers: [[spoiler: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]


* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, there are female characters that are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own without the help of the male characters.

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* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, there are the female characters that are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own as characters without the help of the male characters. characters having to carry the scene. [[spoilers: In the end, Lelouchs sister Nunnally becomes the Empress of Britannia after the death of her brother.]]

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* ''Anime/CodeGeass'' Although the two main characters in the show , Lelouch and Suzuki, are male, there are female characters that are arguably the ones responsible for driving the narrative and manage to hold their own without the help of the male characters.

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* ''ComicBook/AForce'': A Marvel superhero team consisting entirely of women from the Avengers, including several names found elsewhere on this list like Captain Marvel and She-Hulk.
* ''ComicBook/UnstoppableWasp'': Nadia van Dyne is an enthusiastic {{Science Hero}}ine eager for adventures. Her recurring mentor is her [[GoodStepmother stepmother]] Janet van Dyne, the original Wasp and the first female Avenger. Nearly all of her supporting characters, not to mention her most prominent team-ups, are women and girls, many of whom are her friends through [[FunWithAcronyms Genius In action Research Labs]].


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* ''Disney/RalphBreaksTheInternet'' has an extended sequence in which Vanellope meets the characters who comprise the Franchise/DisneyPrincess lineup. They [[LampshadeHanging jokingly acknowledge]] some of the more sexist tropes that have informed the franchise (focus on external over internal beauty, DamselInDistress status, etc.), act as {{Big Sister Mentor}}s to Vanellope, and [[spoiler:in the climax, the fourteen of them basically become a superhero team, using their unique skills and {{Iconic Item}}s to save Ralph's life.]]


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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Megamind}}'' is an AffectionateParody of the Silver Age of Comics. Roxanne Ritchie is a ComicBook/LoisLane-style reporter and frequent DamselInDistress for various evil schemes, but she's easily the most level-headed character and her skills as a journalist save the day repeatedly throughout the movie. The villain Tighten turns evil when Roxanne tells him that she is not interested in him, as he had figured that heroics would automatically entitle him to his crush.


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* ''WesternAnimation/DCSuperHeroGirls'' is spearheaded by Creator/LaurenFaust, a name you'll see much of as this section continues. As the title suggests, it follows six heroines from DC Comics [[HighSchoolAU reimagined as high school students]]. They have wildly different personalities, but have a common drive to serve their city and consistently support each other, a reflection of Faust's "there's no 'wrong' way to be a girl" philosophy. Apart from MonsterOfTheWeek situations, the majority of the villains are also female, and nearly every episode passes UsefulNotes/TheBechdelTest. Consider the show's TitleDrop moment: after the heroines have saved the city, a group of preteen girls cheer, amazed to see a group of super hero girls.

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* ''Literature/TheImmortalJourney'' takes place after a ZombieApocalypse in the future, where the few remaining humans can't afford to be weak-willed, no matter their gender. The protagonist is female, but even outside of her none of the women in this story are to be trifled with. Daisy the instructor is stated to be the main reason Emily's team hasn't gone soft, [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Carol]] regularly rebuffs the man she bodyguards, her maker Nicole is an extremely gifted WrenchWench (while Carol's impossibly advanced AI was created by another woman), and the leader of the Manhattan vampires (Manhattan being one of the last bastions of life on Earth) is also female.


** Director Creator/KunihikoIkuhara's work as a whole tends to fall into this category, although his most recent series, ''Anime/YurikumaArashi'', may actually unseat ''Utena'' in terms of [[AuthorTract unbridled fury]] at the patriarchal structure of Japanese society, particularly in how it affects the way that women, especially lesbians, are portrayed in fictional media. Initially presented as a surreal fairy-tale take on the YuriGenre set in an all-female high school in a world where humans and bears have been separated by a massive Severance Wall, it rapidly becomes clear that not only does Ikuhara intend to [[DeconstructorFleet subvert and even deconstruct]] [[UnfortunateImplications the sexist and homophobic assumptions]] [[ValuesDissonance underlying many such works and tropes]], but to explore how the implicit and explicit condemnation of nonconformity (especially with love, sexuality and gender roles) adversely affects how individuals look at themselves and others. It's certainly [[MindScrew not the easiest nut to crack]], but the message and the passion behind it shines through regardless.

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** Director Creator/KunihikoIkuhara's work as a whole tends to fall into this category, although his most recent series, ''Anime/YurikumaArashi'', ''Anime/YurikumaArashi'' may actually unseat ''Utena'' in terms of [[AuthorTract unbridled fury]] at the patriarchal structure of Japanese society, particularly in how it affects the way that women, especially lesbians, are portrayed in fictional media. Initially presented as a surreal fairy-tale take on the YuriGenre set in an all-female high school in a world where humans and bears have been separated by a massive Severance Wall, it rapidly becomes clear that not only does Ikuhara intend to [[DeconstructorFleet subvert and even deconstruct]] [[UnfortunateImplications the sexist and homophobic assumptions]] [[ValuesDissonance underlying many such works and tropes]], but to explore how the implicit and explicit condemnation of nonconformity (especially with love, sexuality and gender roles) adversely affects how individuals look at themselves and others. It's certainly [[MindScrew not the easiest nut to crack]], but the message and the passion behind it shines through regardless.



* ''Manga/PrincessKnight'': One of the first manga to tackle gender issues. [[FairForItsDay Was considered very feminist at its time, maybe not so much today]], but it is still highly influential and is even the ''first shoujo'' manga.
* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' has a strong focus on the Feminine as a source of power, with the Princesses of various celestial bodies acting as the protectors of the universe. These powers are passed from mother to daughter, with WordOfGod explicitly stating that there is no current Sailor Earth because men cannot become Sailor Warriors. Tuxedo Kamen (the Prince of Earth) is TheOneGuy of the group, and primarily there to provide support to the women rather than to rescue or protect them. Female sensuality and sexuality are subtly and respectfully explored in the series, avoiding equating [[IncorruptiblePurePureness purity]] with VirginPower as the heroine is both [[OnlyThePureOfHeart the purest of heart]] ''and'' intimate with her boyfriend. The relationship between Haruka and Michiru is portrayed without the typical fanservice related to lesbian couples, instead focusing on the strength of their devotion to each other.
** The 20th anniversary series, ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'' is even more blatant right in its OpeningTheme, ''Moon Pride''.

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* %%* ''Manga/PrincessKnight'': One of the first manga to tackle gender issues. [[FairForItsDay Was considered very feminist at its time, maybe not so much today]], but it is still highly influential and is even the ''first shoujo'' manga.
* ''Franchise/SailorMoon'' has a strong focus on the Feminine feminine as a source of power, with the Princesses of various celestial bodies acting as the protectors of the universe. These powers are passed from mother to daughter, with WordOfGod explicitly stating that there is no current Sailor Earth because men cannot become Sailor Warriors. Tuxedo Kamen (the Mask, the Prince of Earth) Earth, is TheOneGuy of the group, and primarily there to provide support to the women rather than to rescue or protect them. Female sensuality and sexuality are subtly and respectfully explored in the series, avoiding equating [[IncorruptiblePurePureness purity]] with VirginPower as the heroine is both [[OnlyThePureOfHeart the purest of heart]] ''and'' intimate with her boyfriend. The relationship between Haruka and Michiru is portrayed without the typical fanservice related to lesbian couples, instead focusing on the strength of their devotion to each other.
** The 20th anniversary 20th-anniversary series, ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'' ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', is even more blatant right in its OpeningTheme, ''Moon Pride''.



** The notable thing about Sailor Moon, however, is that it doesn't go and present the path of an idealized 'super tomboy' as an alternative, but contains large amounts of pink and frills and unicorns... and turns them into symbols of cosmic power, generally avoiding the message that you have to fit into a certain "box". Sure, there's one tomboyish character, but she's not ''defined'' by that and gets intricate motivations and characterization. There's a princessy hopeless romantic, but also someone who wants to become a doctor. What really set the show apart (especially compared to the American cartoons of the time who just had a token smurfette, BettyAndVeronica or at best a TomboyAndGirlyGirl contrast where the character is completely defined by their possesion or lack of whatever "girlyness" is supposed to be) is that the various female characters have distinct, varied personalities not built around stereotypes related to their gender, but something that is sensibly related to the plot, such as the elemental powers associated with their planets.

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** The notable thing about Sailor Moon, the series, however, is that it doesn't go and present the path of an idealized 'super tomboy' as an alternative, but contains large amounts of pink and frills and unicorns... and turns them into symbols of cosmic power, generally avoiding the message that you have to fit into a certain "box". Sure, there's one tomboyish character, but she's not ''defined'' by that and gets intricate motivations and characterization. There's a princessy hopeless romantic, but also someone who wants to become a doctor. What really set the show apart (especially compared to the American cartoons of the time who just had a token smurfette, BettyAndVeronica or at best a TomboyAndGirlyGirl contrast where the character is completely defined by their possesion or lack of whatever "girlyness" is supposed to be) is that the various female characters have distinct, varied personalities not built around stereotypes related to their gender, but something that is sensibly related to the plot, such as the elemental powers associated with their planets.


* [[http://www.btchflcks.com/2013/01/no-man-may-have-me-red-sonja-a-feminist-film-in-disguise.html#.XLMmhFQzaUk There's a case to be made]] about ''Fim/RedSonja'', the 1985 film adaptation of the eponymous comics.

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* [[http://www.btchflcks.com/2013/01/no-man-may-have-me-red-sonja-a-feminist-film-in-disguise.html#.XLMmhFQzaUk There's a case to be made]] about ''Fim/RedSonja'', ''Film/RedSonja'', the 1985 film adaptation of the eponymous comics.

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* [[http://www.btchflcks.com/2013/01/no-man-may-have-me-red-sonja-a-feminist-film-in-disguise.html#.XLMmhFQzaUk There's a case to be made]] about ''Fim/RedSonja'', the 1985 film adaptation of the eponymous comics.


* ''Film/Ghostbusters2016'' is a {{Reboot}} of the franchise, starring a GenderFlipped cast. The team consists of a group of female scientists (and an amateur historian) who wear practical uniforms and kick plenty of ass while fighting to get the respect they've earned.

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* ''Film/Ghostbusters2016'' is a {{Reboot}} of the franchise, starring a GenderFlipped cast. The team consists of a group of female scientists (and an amateur historian) who wear practical uniforms and kick plenty of ass while fighting to get the respect they've earned. The filmography of director Creator/PaulFeig itself tends towards the trope in the comedy genre.



* ''Film/WonderWoman2017'' stars the aforementioned comic book superhero of the same name and is about her journey from the LadyLand of Themyscira into Man's World at the height of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI where she fights to end one of the deadliest conflicts in human history. True to the comics, Wonder Woman embodies a number of positive, strong feminine ideals such as empathy, love and truth while also being a super strong demigoddess capable of kickings ''tons'' of ass. In a meta sense, the film is also the first tent pole superhero film to be [[Creator/PattyJenkins directed by a woman]] and the first theatrical comic book adaptation with a female lead ''ever'' to receive critical acclaim and commercial success.

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* ''Film/WonderWoman2017'' ''Film/{{Wonder Woman|2017}}'' stars the aforementioned comic book superhero of the same name and is about her journey from the LadyLand of Themyscira into Man's World at the height of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI where she fights to end one of the deadliest conflicts in human history. True to the comics, Wonder Woman embodies a number of positive, strong feminine ideals such as empathy, love and truth while also being a super strong demigoddess capable of kickings ''tons'' of ass. In a meta sense, the film is also the first tent pole superhero film to be [[Creator/PattyJenkins directed by a woman]] and the first theatrical comic book adaptation with centered around a female lead ''ever'' to receive critical acclaim and commercial success.



* ''Film/CaptainMarvel2019'' is a fiercely and unapologetically Feminist film, bringing the heroine to the screen in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'''s first film to star a woman. An AmnesiacHero, Vers is a Kree warrior fighting in the galactic war against the shapeshifting Skrulls when she crash-lands on Earth in the 1990s. Forming a partnership with a young Nick Fury, Vers beings to discover clues to her own past as a human fighter pilot named Carol Danvers. The film features several TakeThat moments to common criticisms that women face such as seeming unfriendly for not "smiling enough" or being required to prove themselves to gate-keeping men. In a twist on the classic mythos, [[spoiler: the mysterious woman from Carol's past turns out to have been the original Mar-Vell]] and the final confrontation concludes with [[spoiler: Carol ignoring her former commander's taunts to fight him on ''his'' terms, blasting him into a mountain before stating she doesn't have to prove herself to him]]. The film is a Power Fantasy for women, portraying numerous badass women that are unapologetic in their confidence and ability. It also takes the time to include messages of inspiration for the next generation of girls, encouraging them to pursue their ambitions without compromise.

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* ''Film/CaptainMarvel2019'' ''Film/{{Captain Marvel|2019}}'' is a fiercely and unapologetically Feminist film, bringing the heroine to the screen in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'''s first film to star be centered around a woman.female protagonist. An AmnesiacHero, Vers is a Kree warrior fighting in the galactic war against the shapeshifting Skrulls when she crash-lands on Earth in the 1990s. Forming a partnership with a young Nick Fury, Vers beings to discover clues to her own past as a human fighter pilot named Carol Danvers. The film features several TakeThat moments to common criticisms that women face such as seeming unfriendly for not "smiling enough" or being required to prove themselves to gate-keeping men. In a twist on the classic mythos, [[spoiler: the mysterious woman from Carol's past turns out to have been the original Mar-Vell]] and the final confrontation concludes with [[spoiler: Carol ignoring her former commander's taunts to fight him on ''his'' terms, blasting him into a mountain before stating she doesn't have to prove herself to him]]. The film is a Power Fantasy for women, portraying numerous badass women that are unapologetic in their confidence and ability. It also takes the time to include messages of inspiration for the next generation of girls, encouraging them to pursue their ambitions without compromise.


* ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} has had multiple incarnations, but is always one of the most powerful heroes around.

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* ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} has had multiple incarnations, but is always one of the most powerful heroes around.around since she is the DistaffCounterpart to Franchise/{{Superman}}.


Note that this is not (necessarily) a LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, which [[TheUnfairSex denigrates men]] and/or [[AllAbusersAreMale relegates them to villain status]] [[PositiveDiscrimination in the name of being "feminist"]]. Nor does it have to be {{Anvilicious}} about gender issues to qualify. Often brought to extremes with fantasy that features an ImprobablyFemaleCast.

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Note that this is not (necessarily) a LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, which [[TheUnfairSex denigrates men]] and/or [[AllAbusersAreMale relegates them to villain status]] [[PositiveDiscrimination in the name of being "feminist"]]. Nor does it have to be {{Anvilicious}} about gender issues to qualify. Often brought to extremes with fantasy that features an ImprobablyFemaleCast.


Note that this is not (necessarily) a LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, which denigrates men or relegates them to villain status in the name of being "feminist". Nor does it have to be {{Anvilicious}} about gender issues to qualify. Often brought to extremes with fantasy that features an ImprobablyFemaleCast.

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Note that this is not (necessarily) a LifetimeMovieOfTheWeek, which [[TheUnfairSex denigrates men or men]] and/or [[AllAbusersAreMale relegates them to villain status status]] [[PositiveDiscrimination in the name of being "feminist"."feminist"]]. Nor does it have to be {{Anvilicious}} about gender issues to qualify. Often brought to extremes with fantasy that features an ImprobablyFemaleCast.

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