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[[quoteright:270:[[{{Manga/Akagi}} https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/akagi_is_jesus3.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:270:A TabletopGame/{{mahjong}} match... of ''[[Literature/TheBible Biblical]]'' proportions.]]

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[[quoteright:270:[[{{Manga/Akagi}} https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/akagi_is_jesus3.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:270:A TabletopGame/{{mahjong}} match... of ''[[Literature/TheBible Biblical]]'' proportions.]]
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* LastSupperSteal

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**''VideoGame/Halo4'' also introduces the [[KillerRobot Prometheans]], who are being used by the [[BigBad Didact]] to... destroy humanity, and transfer control of the galaxy back to the Forerunners. This is odd because Prometheus stole fire from the gods, and gave it to humanity, so that humanity could flourish.


* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda''. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness The first games in the series]] had a number of Christian elements and imagery, most of which were [[{{Bowdlerise}} removed]] from localizations as a result of [=NoA=]'s policy against the depiction of religious elements:

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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda''.''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda''. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness The first games in the series]] had a number of Christian elements and imagery, most of which were [[{{Bowdlerise}} removed]] from localizations as a result of [=NoA=]'s policy against the depiction of religious elements:


** Other allusions to the Bible appear a fair bit. One very notable example is in episode 7 of the original ''Series/{{Ultraman}}'' "The Bloe Stone of Barraj", where Science Patrol goes to the Middle East, and at the title city, they spot Mt. Ararat (the mountain Noah's Ark landed after the flood) in the background and learn that the people of Barraj worship Noah, who is represented with a statue of Ultraman. Whether this means Ultraman ''[[AllMythsAreTrue is]]'' the biblical Noah, or that Noah was a human host for Ultraman is never explained.

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** Other allusions to the Bible appear a fair bit. One very notable example is in episode 7 of the original ''Series/{{Ultraman}}'' "The Bloe Blue Stone of Barraj", where Science Patrol goes to the Middle East, and at the title city, they spot Mt. Ararat (the mountain Noah's Ark landed after the flood) in the background and learn that the people of Barraj worship Noah, who is represented with a statue of Ultraman. Whether this means Ultraman ''[[AllMythsAreTrue is]]'' the biblical Noah, or that Noah was a human host for Ultraman is never explained.


* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' has Mario Auditore actually say [[SuperMarioBros It's a me, Mario]]. Because it's a video game ABOUT video games. Get it!?

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* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' has Mario Auditore actually say [[SuperMarioBros [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros It's a me, Mario]]. Because it's a video game ABOUT video games. Get it!?


--> '''Slick''': The appeal of ''"StarWars"'' is that it's open to different interpretations. [[http://www.sinfest.net/view.php?date=2000-01-22 Let's have a look at some!]]

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--> '''Slick''': The appeal of ''"StarWars"'' ''"Franchise/StarWars"'' is that it's open to different interpretations. [[http://www.sinfest.net/view.php?date=2000-01-22 Let's have a look at some!]]


** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'': [=SeeDs=] schools are called gardens and one of the [=GFs=] is called Eden. Also, Seifer longcoat has the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Saint_James]] on the sleeves.

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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'': [=SeeDs=] schools are called gardens and one of the [=GFs=] is called Eden. Also, Seifer longcoat has the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Saint_James]] org/wiki/Cross_of_Saint_James Cross of Saint James]] on the sleeves.





* ''VideoGame/LuminousArc2'' has an interesting case with Mage Queen Elicia, whose witch title in Japanese is called "Holy Mother" and her outfit is very similar to her herself. Averted in English, which changed to Dark Queen instead.
* ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' are notorious among VideoGames for being chock-full of religious symbolism. Matters are complicated by the fact that the core story really ''is'' based around religious symbolism--''Xenogears'' in particular is heavily inspired by the Gnostic interpretation of Christianity. The creators have published writings that explain every symbol and layer of the story.
** Some of this was lost in translation. The Elementals were named for four of the nine choirs of angels. Cherubina (Kelvena), Throne (Tolone), Seraphita and Dominia. Mr. Inferiority Complex Ramsus has a phonetic Japanese spelling that makes his surname pronounced like Rameses. And Miang's surname is a shout-out to Eve (Hawwa/Chavah).
** Since it's so deeply ingrained in the story and how things play out, it's obvious the writers of Xenogers DO understand Gnosticism... they just happened to twist it beyond recognition.
** ''Xenosaga'' is much more guilty of this, tossing around heady religious, philosophical, scientific and literary references willy-nilly that serve little to no coherent symbolic purpose - e.g. the series of [[SuperRobot Super Robots]] named after the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
** Much of ''Xenosaga's'' symbolism can be understood if the gamer can significantly bend their understanding of some of the key concepts of Jungian psychology, quantum physics, and Judeo-Christian theology. If this isn't possible... then the whole thing is just a mess of references that are probably best left not understood.
** ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'', ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', and ''VideoGame/XenobladeChronicles2'' all have plenty of Biblical symbolism, with varying degrees of relevance. This is lampshaded near the end of ''2'', when Malos finds out [[spoiler:that the true names of the three Aegises]] were Logos, Ontos, and Pneuma (Greek for Mind, Body, and Soul). When Malos asks what those names mean, he is snarkily told that they mean the people who created them were pretentious fools.
* {{Creator/Bungie}} games tend to do this.
** ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' had Durandal trying to become God of the next universe, and quoting the Bible and such.
** The ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'' series is awash with Biblical and religious allusions (the Covenant, the Flood, the Ark, and the eponymous Halos, to name just the most obvious ones), most of which amount to little more than window dressing for a relatively straightforward "humans versus aliens" plot. Plus, the number 7 is hidden ''[[http://halo.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_%22seven%22_references_in_Halo EVERYWHERE]]''. That said, the Halos were built from the Ark, where the Forerunners also stored every single sentient species they could find. After they activated the Halos to kill all life left the galaxy, thus starving the Flood, they reseeded the galaxy with the life they had stored on the Ark, including humans and every Covenant species.
** Allusions to Islam also exist to a lesser extent within their games. The design team for ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' almost chose the name Dervish - an Arabic term for someone following the ascetic path of extreme poverty and austerity - instead of the Arbiter. They ultimately decided against the name considering the fact that they already had a character named "The Prophet Of Truth".

to:

* ''VideoGame/LuminousArc2'' has an interesting case with Mage Queen Elicia, whose witch title in Japanese is A little-known game called "Holy Mother" ''Adventures of Darwin'' features a tribe of monkeys that have to [[ArtisticLicenseBiology evolve into humans]] in time to survive the coming apocalypse. They are led by a monkey named Darwin, a ShoutOut that would make the actual Charles Darwin spin in his grave. Where does the symbology come in? The final boss is [[spoiler:{{God}} [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu Himself]].]] Well, okay, according to the bestiary, [[spoiler:He is actually [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Zeus]], but given the context, he's clearly meant to be a monotheistic God, not one of a pantheon.]]
* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedBrotherhood'' in the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKrtbUinWOU]] trailer toward the middle. As Ezio approaches his target
and her outfit other Assassins kill guards for him he walks (in slow motion) through a mass of cardinals, all wearing red, who get out of his way. [[Creator/{{Tobuscus}} "PART THE RED SEA!"]]
** Since he's in the Vatican, he's actually [[IncrediblyLamePun Parting the Red See]].
* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' has Mario Auditore actually say [[SuperMarioBros It's a me, Mario]]. Because it's a video game ABOUT video games. Get it!?
* The game ''VideoGame/{{Baroque}}''
is very similar ''littered'' with crosses and Gnostic imagery. If you explore the Outer World, you can find a graveyard of metal framework crosses in the background.
* ''VideoGame/TheBeginnersGuide'': The narrator presents you with a series of short games that a friend of his has made, and sometimes makes changes
to her herself. the code, to help demonstrate his theories on his friend's mental processes over the span of several years where said friend sinks into depression. [[spoiler: Or not. None of it is actually true. This tendency to see symbolism where there was none has driven the two apart, and the friend has even left behind a message telling the narrator that, because of this habit of showing these games (which have been modified to fit the narrator's perceived symbolism) to other people, he can't enjoy making games anymore.]] This all goes over the narrator's head as he [[spoiler:pleads the players to help him find his friend back, so he can feel the validation of demonstrating the games, and his theories on them, to the public again.]]
* In ''VideoGame/BrainDead13'', one of the resurrection scenes (in case Lance dies in haunted rooms) shows the "fires of rebirth" reform Lance's body and restore him to life. This is a bit strange, as it is kind of reminiscent of ThePhoenix, which is an ancient and well known symbol of death and rebirth and portrayed as a magical bird made of living flames; the story says that when a Phoenix reaches the end of its life, it would make a cinnamon stick nest and self-immolate itself with fire, and from the ashes a new Phoenix is reborn. This could explain the "fiery" resurrection scene that Lance, like a Phoenix, can rise from the ashes of defeat and start over. Weird.
* In ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'', Satanic circles are used as waypoint markers. It's supposed to fit in with the Metal theme. The Demons have a five-pointed emblem as well, but it's a Cheveron with a "V" superimposed.
*
Averted in English, which changed to Dark Queen instead.
* ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' are notorious among VideoGames for being chock-full of religious symbolism. Matters are complicated by
the fact ''VideoGame/ChzoMythos''. In ''5 Days A Stranger'', Jim at one point mentions he's been reading a copy of ''Literature/TreasureIsland'' that he found in the core story really ''is'' based around religious symbolism--''Xenogears'' library, but prefers Creator/TerryPratchett. These references neither parallel the plot in any way, nor do they have any significant personal meaning to the characters (except perhaps the way a kid named Jim takes a shine to a shady character). In Quovak's LetsPlay, Yahtzee admits that he was never even pretending there was any symbolism; at the time he wrote that scene, namedropping a couple of well-known authors for no particular is heavily inspired by the Gnostic interpretation of Christianity. The creators have published writings that explain every symbol and layer of the story.
** Some of this was lost in translation. The Elementals were named for four of the nine choirs of angels. Cherubina (Kelvena), Throne (Tolone), Seraphita and Dominia. Mr. Inferiority Complex Ramsus has a phonetic Japanese spelling that makes his surname pronounced
reason seemed like Rameses. And Miang's surname is a shout-out terribly clever thing to Eve (Hawwa/Chavah).
** Since it's
do, so deeply ingrained in the story and how things play out, it's obvious the writers of Xenogers DO understand Gnosticism... they just happened to twist it beyond recognition.
** ''Xenosaga'' is much more guilty of this, tossing around heady religious, philosophical, scientific and literary
he did it.
* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' has many
references willy-nilly that serve little to no coherent symbolic purpose - e.g. the series of [[SuperRobot Super Robots]] various religions, literary works, legends, and mythologies. ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' is a favorite: Dante was named after Dante Alighieri, after all, and Vergil was named after Publius Vergilius Maro.
** Just look at
the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
** Much of ''Xenosaga's'' symbolism can be understood if the gamer can significantly bend their understanding
names of some of the key concepts of Jungian psychology, quantum physics, and Judeo-Christian theology. If this isn't possible... then the whole thing is just a mess of references that are probably best left not understood.
** ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'', ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', and ''VideoGame/XenobladeChronicles2'' all have plenty of Biblical symbolism, with varying degrees of relevance. This is lampshaded near the end of ''2'', when Malos finds out [[spoiler:that the true names of the three Aegises]] were Logos, Ontos, and Pneuma (Greek for Mind, Body, and Soul). When Malos asks what those names mean, he is snarkily told that they mean the people who created them were pretentious fools.
* {{Creator/Bungie}} games tend to do this.
** ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' had Durandal trying to become God of the next universe, and quoting the Bible and such.
weapons (and bosses): Cerberus, Lucifer, Gilgamesh, Pandora, Ifrit...
** The ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'' series whole third game is awash with Biblical and religious allusions (the Covenant, a reimagining of Dante's Inferno. For example, the Flood, third level has Dante fight Cerberus--and who guards the Ark, and the eponymous Halos, to name just the most obvious ones), most third circle of which amount to little more than window dressing for a relatively straightforward "humans versus aliens" plot. Plus, the number 7 is hidden ''[[http://halo.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_%22seven%22_references_in_Halo EVERYWHERE]]''. That said, the Halos were built from the Ark, where the Forerunners also stored every single sentient species they could find. After they activated the Halos to kill all life left the galaxy, thus starving the Flood, they reseeded the galaxy with the life they had stored on the Ark, including humans and every Covenant species.
** Allusions to Islam also exist to a lesser extent within their games. The design team for ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}'' almost chose the name Dervish -
hell?
* One part of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' traps your characters in
an Arabic term for someone following the ascetic path of extreme poverty and austerity - instead of the Arbiter. They ultimately decided against the name considering the fact that they already had a character named EldritchLocation called "The Prophet Of Truth".Fade", and you basically travel between various "areas" of the specific level that for some reason look like the Jewish Kabbalah.



* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', this is {{Invoked}} by the Dunmeri PhysicalGod Vivec in his [[https://www.imperial-library.info/content/thirty-six-lessons-vivec-sermon-one Thirty-Six Lessons]] series. He uses ''oodles'' of biblical imagery to make sure that, if you take it seriously, there is NO WAY a person could see Vivec as anything less than the ''absolute god'' of ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe (which, of course, isn't necessarily true). Doubles with BreakingTheFourthWall, {{Anvilicious}}, Administrivia/TropesAreNotBad, and GettingCrapPastTheRadar with a sprinkling of InJoke.
* ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', wherein humanity discovers a wormhole (the titular ''EVE'') which ''delivers'' mankind to the ''New Eden'' system in another galaxy. It only gets better from this point onward, especially if you take the time to read the names of some of the systems and constellations.
** This seems to be more an example of the sort of names humans would actually come up with rather than unsubtle references.
* The Tattered Spire in ''VideoGame/FableII'' is, at its full height, a model of Hell from Dante's ''[[Literature/TheDivineComedy Inferno]]''.
* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'': The Summons. Odin, Lakshmi, Quetzalcoatl and the like make sense in the context of being gods, but [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Eden]]? [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX Ark]]?
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'': Two of the first towns are Canaan and Ur.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'': The final series of bosses is a giant throwback to ''The Divine Comedy''. The first tier of enemies consists of a demon shown from the waist up, symbolizing Hell with Lucifer frozen up to his waist. The second tier is a jumbled mess of machinery, animals and people, representing Purgatory. The third tier, the formerly overcast and dark background has beams of light shining through the clouds, and the two enemies look like Jesus lying in Mary's lap, but with "Mary" as a disembodied head and "Jesus" looking like Kefka. The fourth tier, the heroes rise up from the overcast background to a sea of glowing white and gold clouds. The final part of ''The Divine Comedy'' has Dante meet God, who tells him the meaning of life. But here, Kefka descends from on high appearing as a FallenAngel, and tells the heroes that life is meaningless.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'': The villain was named after the Kabbalist 'Sephiroth' and he is obsessed with becoming a god; also, a more correct translation of his OneWingedAngel form would be either "Sepher Sephiroth" or "Savior Sephiroth". Not to mention that the game has a sacrificed martyr character.
** In ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'', the character Genesis comes from a town famous for its apple harvest, and is producing clones of himself in an abandoned apple factory. When attempting to incite Sephiroth into rebellion against the Shinra, he offers him an apple. The rest of the final dungeon had a large amount of FauxSymbolism, too, what with Dante's Inferno references and a statue that looked like the Virgin Mary (at least in Japan).
*** Speaking of apples, one can certainly slap some Faux Symbolism onto [[spoiler:the burning apple when Tseng blows up Banora]] really, what could it mean? Especially its connection to not only Genesis but also [[spoiler:Angeal]]... speaking of names and symbolism...
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'': [=SeeDs=] schools are called gardens and one of the [=GFs=] is called Eden. Also, Seifer longcoat has the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_Saint_James]] on the sleeves.



* The ''{{Franchise/Halo}}'' series is awash with Biblical and religious allusions (the Covenant, the Flood, the Ark, and the eponymous Halos, to name just the most obvious ones), most of which amount to little more than window dressing for a relatively straightforward "humans versus aliens" plot. Plus, the number 7 is hidden ''[[http://halo.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_%22seven%22_references_in_Halo EVERYWHERE]]''. That said, the Halos were built from the Ark, where the Forerunners also stored every single sentient species they could find. After they activated the Halos to kill all life left the galaxy, thus starving the Flood, they reseeded the galaxy with the life they had stored on the Ark, including humans and every Covenant species.
** Allusions to Islam also exist to a lesser extent within their games. The design team for ''VideoGame/Halo2'' almost chose the name Dervish - an Arabic term for someone following the ascetic path of extreme poverty and austerity - instead of the Arbiter. They ultimately decided against the name considering the fact that they already had a character named "The Prophet Of Truth".
* Parodied in ''VisualNovel/HatofulBoyfriend'' where the character [[AwesomeMcCoolname Anghel Higure]] (his last name being spelled in the Japanese version with two kanji both meaning 'red') who screams all the time about being a FallenAngel, the reincarnation of the Crimson Angel of Judecca and a Servant of God born whose destiny is to battle Demon Spores. He is actually the notorious school eccentric Akagi Yoshio, and he's a member of the Manga Club--and when the player enters his fantasy world, it's just a turn-based (and outrageously cheesy) JRPG, implying he's just a DaydreamBeliever who is into media containing Faux Symbolism rather than an actual believer in angels... although delving into the Latin he uses [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane casts some doubt on this]].
* ''JESUS: Dreadful Bio Monster'': After the rise of the internet made this Japan-only game known lots of Western people were tempted to play this visual novel because it looked like if it was going to give a new view on Christianity. When they finally got their hands on it it turned out to be a visual novel that talked about aliens invading a space station. The only reason it has JESUS in the title is because that is the name that they gave to the space station of the game.
* In ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', SNKBoss Goenitz is a priest, and in his waiting for turn animation, he is seen reading a book (presumibly a Bible). He serves and awaits the return of a powerful, supernatural entity who would bring TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, who ended reincarnating in a the body of a boy named Chris; and to top it, he would throw phrases like "pray to your god" before fighting. In addittion, the SpinOff dating simulation games ''Days of Memories'' has him, Chris and Shermie wearing {{cr|eepyCoolCrosses}}ucifixes. Also, Kyo wears a black shirt with a cross in the NESTS saga.
* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' sure has a lot of maternal symbolism. One quest requires you to take a statue of a woman to an area where you can see sperm swimming around in the background, and then stand under a diagram of the uterus.
** [[spoiler: The final boss]] is all over this. [[spoiler: Especially the third form, where she takes on a really creepy version of the Virgin Mary. Also, one of her attacks is raining crosses on you.]]
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda''. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness The first games in the series]] had a number of Christian elements and imagery, most of which were [[{{Bowdlerise}} removed]] from localizations as a result of [=NoA=]'s policy against the depiction of religious elements:
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'': There's a cross engraved on Link's shield, and the Book of Magic was called "Bible" in Japan (this is especially evident from looking at its [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/4/46/TLoZ_Book_of_Magic_Artwork.png?version=072c7ff86c6faf9e0670e9aab765a143 official artwork]])
** ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'': Shields, gravestones and [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/c/cf/TAoL_Wizzrobe_Artwork.png?version=3a261d9746aec0dff3ec5421a27d8c32 Wizard enemies]] have crosses on them, and there's even a [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/3/35/TAoL_Cross_Artwork.png?version=56c1a106bc9bc1b93de1c4e4312b925a cross item]] that the player can collect.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'': In Japan, the Sanctuary was a Church, the sage there was a priest, Agahnim's deceit of the king involved claiming to be a priest sent by God (as opposed to a wizard), and there's [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/a/ab/LinkPraying.png?version=ad567538683c1ccb7c732c63bd90e856 this official artwork]] that depicts Link as a Christian praying in front of a crucifix. In addition, opening the entrance to the Desert Palace involves Link praying with church music in the background as he makes praying gestures with his hands.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' broke the trend by having Islamic elements instead. The Gerudo symbol depicted a crescent moon and star, very similar to the symbol of the Islamic faith. In addition, an Islamic prayer could be heard in the Fire Temple's background music. Both elements were removed from later versions of the game, which introduced a new Gerudo symbol being used. Said symbol was used by later games, effectively retconning the original symbol away.
* ''VideoGame/LuminousArc2'' has an interesting case with Mage Queen Elicia, whose witch title in Japanese is called "Holy Mother" and her outfit is very similar to her herself. Averted in English, which changed to Dark Queen instead.
* In the old arcade game called ''[=MagMax=]'', also made for the NES, you fight a [[HybridMonster three-headed cyborg dragon machine]] called Babylon, which is odd since the name "Babylon" is mentioned a few times in some Hebrew Bible readings and in the Literature/BookOfRevelation in the Christian Bible's New Testament (even peculiar is that in Revelation, Babylon is a symbolic harlot who has a symbolic dragon-like beast with seven heads and ten horns; that beast may be like the mechanical dragon machine you see in the game).
* ''VideoGame/{{Marathon}}'' had Durandal trying to become God of the next universe, and quoting the Bible and such.
* Inverted entirely in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'', when most people missed the oodles of valid and proper Norse symbolism. Done in-universe when a boss grabs entirely the wrong end of the stick and concludes he's ''literally'' Fenris in human form living in the first days of Ragnarok; he's not only SadlyMythtaken in how he understands the mythology, he's somehow mixed in every god he's ever heard of up to and including Cthulhu.
* ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid2'' names the Test Subjects (Golab, Harab Serap, Chagadiel) after the Kabbalist Qliphoth for no good reason, and names the Metal Gear Chaioth Ha Kadosh (host of angels) and gives it a choral piece as a {{Leitmotif}}.
** The opening scene of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' shows Snake (who had at this point abandoned his dream of having a normal life in order to fight against [[HumongousMecha Metal Gear]] proliferation, as his 'duty to the coming generations') throwing himself off a bridge with his legs together and his arms outstretched in a wide crucifix pose. He's in [[InvisibilityCloak Active Camo]] at this point, so the effect is made even more extreme by the fact that all that's visible is the outline of his long-haired, nearly-naked silhouette. Oh, and an ethereal choral song plays as he does it. [[WhatCouldHaveBeen For a while during development]], it would have been more extreme, with Snake wearing a brilliant white parachute that would spread out behind his body like a pair of angel wings. A lot of the symbolism is mollified, though, by the fact that when he lands on the surface of the Tanker there's a big HomageShot to, of all things, ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}''.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' is considered by many to be a major offender, with codenames like ADAM and EVA, Snake, and biblical comparisons in the ending monologue. Likewise with Part 3 of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', where a discussion of the events of [=MGS3=] takes place in a church and adds a very symbolic apple to the mix. It a more meta-symbolic sense, there are many easy-to-miss references to the earlier games, to the point where at least one analysis speculated that ''the way certain eggs in a loading cutscene cook'' represents earlier characters and events.
* In the first ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' game, there's a scene where villain Jade Setsuna has Maria tied to a cross, with the manga indicating that he was [[MindRape Mind Raping]] her.



* Joshua from ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' attacks with "Jesus Beams." [[spoiler:It looks as though it symbolizes his being God or Jesus, but he's really just the Composer, which is a position that is supervised by the Producer. {{God}} wouldn't have a superviser.]]
* Two of the first towns your party visits in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' are Canaan and Ur.

to:

* Joshua from ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' attacks with "Jesus Beams." [[spoiler:It looks ''VideoGame/SilhouetteMirage'' contains notable examples, such as though it symbolizes his being God or Jesus, but he's really just references like ''Megido'', ''Zohar'', and ''Metatron'', not to mention the Composer, which is a position that is supervised by the Producer. {{God}} wouldn't have a superviser.]]
* Two of the first towns your party visits in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' are Canaan and Ur.
SevenDeadlySins.



* ''VideoGame/MetalGearAcid2'' names the Test Subjects (Golab, Harab Serap, Chagadiel) after the Kabbalist Qliphoth for no good reason, and names the Metal Gear Chaioth Ha Kadosh (host of angels) and gives it a choral piece as a {{Leitmotif}}.
** The opening scene of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' shows Snake (who had at this point abandoned his dream of having a normal life in order to fight against [[HumongousMecha Metal Gear]] proliferation, as his 'duty to the coming generations') throwing himself off a bridge with his legs together and his arms outstretched in a wide crucifix pose. He's in [[InvisibilityCloak Active Camo]] at this point, so the effect is made even more extreme by the fact that all that's visible is the outline of his long-haired, nearly-naked silhouette. Oh, and an ethereal choral song plays as he does it. [[WhatCouldHaveBeen For a while during development]], it would have been more extreme, with Snake wearing a brilliant white parachute that would spread out behind his body like a pair of angel wings. A lot of the symbolism is mollified, though, by the fact that when he lands on the surface of the Tanker there's a big HomageShot to, of all things, ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}''.
** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' is considered by many to be a major offender, with codenames like ADAM and EVA, Snake, and biblical comparisons in the ending monologue. Likewise with Part 3 of ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'', where a discussion of the events of [=MGS3=] takes place in a church and adds a very symbolic apple to the mix. It a more meta-symbolic sense, there are many easy-to-miss references to the earlier games, to the point where at least one analysis speculated that ''the way certain eggs in a loading cutscene cook'' represents earlier characters and events.
* The final series of bosses in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' is a giant throwback to ''The Divine Comedy''. The first tier of enemies consists of a demon shown from the waist up, symbolizing Hell with Lucifer frozen up to his waist. The second tier is a jumbled mess of machinery, animals and people, representing Purgatory. The third tier, the formerly overcast and dark background has beams of light shining through the clouds, and the two enemies look like Jesus lying in Mary's lap, but with "Mary" as a disembodied head and "Jesus" looking like Kefka. The fourth tier, the heroes rise up from the overcast background to a sea of glowing white and gold clouds. The final part of ''The Divine Comedy'' has Dante meet God, who tells him the meaning of life. But here, Kefka descends from on high appearing as a FallenAngel, and tells the heroes that life is meaningless.
* It's pretty fair to say that so many fights wouldn't have been had about ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' if the villain hadn't been named after the Kabbalist 'Sephiroth' and he hadn't been obsessed with becoming a god and there wasn't a sacrificed martyr character.
** Add onto that that a more correct translation of his final form would be to call it Sepher Sephiroth, and watch more heads explode.
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII: VideoGame/CrisisCore'', the character Genesis comes from a town famous for its apple harvest, and is producing clones of himself in an abandoned apple factory. When attempting to incite Sephiroth into rebellion against the Shinra, he offers him an apple. The rest of the final dungeon had a large amount of FauxSymbolism, too, what with Dante's Inferno references and a statue that looked like the Virgin Mary (at least in Japan).
*** Speaking of apples, one can certainly slap some Faux Symbolism onto [[spoiler:the burning apple when Tseng blows up Banora]] really, what could it mean? Especially its connection to not only Genesis but also [[spoiler:Angeal]]... speaking of names and symbolism...
* Yet more examples from ''Franchise/FinalFantasy: The Summons''. Yeah, Odin, Lakshmi, Quetzalcoatl and the like make sense in the context of being gods, but [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Eden]]? [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX Ark]]?
** Eden = Garden of Eden. The schools where the [=SeeDs=] are educated? They are called gardens as well. And Eden bears some resemblance to the flying gardens.
* The Tattered Spire in ''VideoGame/FableII'' is, at its full height, a model of Hell from Dante's ''[[Literature/TheDivineComedy Inferno]]''.
* Inverted entirely in ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'', when most people missed the oodles of valid and proper Norse symbolism. Done in-universe when a boss grabs entirely the wrong end of the stick and concludes he's ''literally'' Fenris in human form living in the first days of Ragnarok; he's not only SadlyMythtaken in how he understands the mythology, he's somehow mixed in every god he's ever heard of up to and including Cthulhu.
* In the first ''VideoGame/SakuraWars'' game, there's a scene where villain Jade Setsuna has Maria tied to a cross, with the manga indicating that he was [[MindRape Mind Raping]] her.
* ''VideoGame/SilhouetteMirage'' contains notable examples, such as references like ''Megido'', ''Zohar'', and ''Metatron'', not to mention the SevenDeadlySins.
* ''VideoGame/EVEOnline'', wherein humanity discovers a wormhole (the titular ''EVE'') which ''delivers'' mankind to the ''New Eden'' system in another galaxy. It only gets better from this point onward, especially if you take the time to read the names of some of the systems and constellations.
** This seems to be more an example of the sort of names humans would actually come up with rather than unsubtle references.
* A little-known game called ''Adventures of Darwin'' features a tribe of monkeys that have to [[ArtisticLicenseBiology evolve into humans]] in time to survive the coming apocalypse. They are led by a monkey named Darwin, a ShoutOut that would make the actual Charles Darwin spin in his grave. Where does the symbology come in? The final boss is [[spoiler:{{God}} [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu Himself]].]] Well, okay, according to the bestiary, [[spoiler:He is actually [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Zeus]], but given the context, he's clearly meant to be a monotheistic God, not one of a pantheon.]]
* In ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', SNKBoss Goenitz is a priest, and in his waiting for turn animation, he is seen reading a book (presumibly a Bible). He serves and awaits the return of a powerful, supernatural entity who would bring TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt, who ended reincarnating in a the body of a boy named Chris; and to top it, he would throw phrases like "pray to your god" before fighting. In addittion, the SpinOff dating simulation games ''Days of Memories'' has him, Chris and Shermie wearing {{cr|eepyCoolCrosses}}ucifixes. Also, Kyo wears a black shirt with a cross in the NESTS saga.



* There's the Heaven/Hell imagery in ''VideoGame/SonicRiders''.
* If you look carefully, you can find this sprinkled through ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory''. Krosse/Cross (although the continent is shaped like a plus rather than a crucifix), Salva/Salvation, Ell/El, etc. There probably isn't much to most of it, beyond ThemeNaming with various other occult/mysticism elements in the series. [[SdrawkcabName Nede]] and the [[BigBad God's Ten Wise Men]] are a bit more germane; [[spoiler: Nede is a major place of {{Precursors}}, and the Wise Men, named for the ethnarchs of the nine angelic choirs ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg plus Lucifer]]), were the collective SuperPrototype of their latest way of maintaining control. It's worth noting that when you leave Lucifer out, you have the ''reverse'' of the actual pseudo-Dionysian hierarchy. There, Metatron ranked highest, and Gabriel ranked lowest; here, it's the other way around]]. Nonetheless, the milieu makes it clear that you're not expected to look ''that'' deeply.
* A ''VideoGame/StarOceanTillTheEndOfTime'' example. The layout for the second last room before the final boss is shaped like the Sephirot. Whether it has general meaning or is just randomness is left ambiguous. Considering that [[spoiler: the last boss--named ''Lucifer'', at that--has one very severe [[AGodAmI god complex]] with regard to his creation, it's probably yet another part of his claim to divinity over the Eternal Sphere]].



* The game ''VideoGame/{{Baroque}}'' is ''littered'' with crosses and Gnostic imagery. If you explore the Outer World, you can find a graveyard of metal framework crosses in the background.
* ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' sure has a lot of maternal symbolism. One quest requires you to take a statue of a woman to an area where you can see sperm swimming around in the background, and then stand under a diagram of the uterus.
** [[spoiler: The final boss]] is all over this. [[spoiler: Especially the third form, where she takes on a really creepy version of the Virgin Mary. Also, one of her attacks is raining crosses on you.]]
* There's the Heaven/Hell imagery in ''VideoGame/SonicRiders''.



* In ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'', Satanic circles are used as waypoint markers. It's supposed to fit in with the Metal theme. The Demons have a five-pointed emblem as well, but it's a Cheveron with a "V" superimposed.
* A ''VideoGame/StarOceanTillTheEndOfTime'' example. The layout for the second last room before the final boss is shaped like the Sephirot. Whether it has general meaning or is just randomness is left ambiguous. Considering that [[spoiler: the last boss--named ''Lucifer'', at that--has one very severe [[AGodAmI god complex]] with regard to his creation, it's probably yet another part of his claim to divinity over the Eternal Sphere]].
* If you look carefully, you can find this sprinkled through ''VideoGame/StarOceanTheSecondStory''. Krosse/Cross (although the continent is shaped like a plus rather than a crucifix), Salva/Salvation, Ell/El, etc. There probably isn't much to most of it, beyond ThemeNaming with various other occult/mysticism elements in the series. [[SdrawkcabName Nede]] and the [[BigBad God's Ten Wise Men]] are a bit more germane; [[spoiler: Nede is a major place of {{Precursors}}, and the Wise Men, named for the ethnarchs of the nine angelic choirs ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg plus Lucifer]]), were the collective SuperPrototype of their latest way of maintaining control. It's worth noting that when you leave Lucifer out, you have the ''reverse'' of the actual pseudo-Dionysian hierarchy. There, Metatron ranked highest, and Gabriel ranked lowest; here, it's the other way around]]. Nonetheless, the milieu makes it clear that you're not expected to look ''that'' deeply.
* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedBrotherhood'' in the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKrtbUinWOU]] trailer toward the middle. As Ezio approaches his target and other Assassins kill guards for him he walks (in slow motion) through a mass of cardinals, all wearing red, who get out of his way. [[Creator/{{Tobuscus}} "PART THE RED SEA!"]]
** Since he's in the Vatican, he's actually [[IncrediblyLamePun Parting the Red See]].
* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'' has Mario Auditore actually say [[SuperMarioBros It's a me, Mario]]. Because it's a video game ABOUT video games. Get it!?
* Averted in the ''VideoGame/ChzoMythos''. In ''5 Days A Stranger'', Jim at one point mentions he's been reading a copy of ''Literature/TreasureIsland'' that he found in the library, but prefers Creator/TerryPratchett. These references neither parallel the plot in any way, nor do they have any significant personal meaning to the characters (except perhaps the way a kid named Jim takes a shine to a shady character). In Quovak's LetsPlay, Yahtzee admits that he was never even pretending there was any symbolism; at the time he wrote that scene, namedropping a couple of well-known authors for no particular reason seemed like a terribly clever thing to do, so he did it.
* ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' has many references to various religions, literary works, legends, and mythologies. ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' is a favorite: Dante was named after Dante Alighieri, after all, and Vergil was named after Publius Vergilius Maro.
** Just look at the names of some of the weapons (and bosses): Cerberus, Lucifer, Gilgamesh, Pandora, Ifrit...
** The whole third game is a reimagining of Dante's Inferno. For example, the third level has Dante fight Cerberus--and who guards the third circle of hell?
* In the old arcade game called ''[=MagMax=]'', also made for the NES, you fight a [[HybridMonster three-headed cyborg dragon machine]] called Babylon, which is odd since the name "Babylon" is mentioned a few times in some Hebrew Bible readings and in the Literature/BookOfRevelation in the Christian Bible's New Testament (even peculiar is that in Revelation, Babylon is a symbolic harlot who has a symbolic dragon-like beast with seven heads and ten horns; that beast may be like the mechanical dragon machine you see in the game).
* Parodied in ''VisualNovel/HatofulBoyfriend'' where the character [[AwesomeMcCoolname Anghel Higure]] (his last name being spelled in the Japanese version with two kanji both meaning 'red') who screams all the time about being a FallenAngel, the reincarnation of the Crimson Angel of Judecca and a Servant of God born whose destiny is to battle Demon Spores. He is actually the notorious school eccentric Akagi Yoshio, and he's a member of the Manga Club--and when the player enters his fantasy world, it's just a turn-based (and outrageously cheesy) JRPG, implying he's just a DaydreamBeliever who is into media containing Faux Symbolism rather than an actual believer in angels... although delving into the Latin he uses [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane casts some doubt on this]].
* In ''VideoGame/BrainDead13'', one of the resurrection scenes (in case Lance dies in haunted rooms) shows the "fires of rebirth" reform Lance's body and restore him to life. This is a bit strange, as it is kind of reminiscent of ThePhoenix, which is an ancient and well known symbol of death and rebirth and portrayed as a magical bird made of living flames; the story says that when a Phoenix reaches the end of its life, it would make a cinnamon stick nest and self-immolate itself with fire, and from the ashes a new Phoenix is reborn. This could explain the "fiery" resurrection scene that Lance, like a Phoenix, can rise from the ashes of defeat and start over. Weird.



* ''JESUS: Dreadful Bio Monster'': After the rise of the internet made this Japan-only game known lots of Western people were tempted to play this visual novel because it looked like if it was going to give a new view on Christianity. When they finally got their hands on it it turned out to be a visual novel that talked about aliens invading a space station. The only reason it has JESUS in the title is because that is the name that they gave to the space station of the game.
* ''VideoGame/TheBeginnersGuide'': The narrator presents you with a series of short games that a friend of his has made, and sometimes makes changes to the code, to help demonstrate his theories on his friend's mental processes over the span of several years where said friend sinks into depression. [[spoiler: Or not. None of it is actually true. This tendency to see symbolism where there was none has driven the two apart, and the friend has even left behind a message telling the narrator that, because of this habit of showing these games (which have been modified to fit the narrator's perceived symbolism) to other people, he can't enjoy making games anymore.]] This all goes over the narrator's head as he [[spoiler:pleads the players to help him find his friend back, so he can feel the validation of demonstrating the games, and his theories on them, to the public again.]]
* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', this is {{Invoked}} by the Dunmeri PhysicalGod Vivec in his [[https://www.imperial-library.info/content/thirty-six-lessons-vivec-sermon-one Thirty-Six Lessons]] series. He uses ''oodles'' of biblical imagery to make sure that, if you take it seriously, there is NO WAY a person could see Vivec as anything less than the ''absolute god'' of ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe (which, of course, isn't necessarily true). Doubles with BreakingTheFourthWall, {{Anvilicious}}, Administrivia/TropesAreNotBad, and GettingCrapPastTheRadar with a sprinkling of InJoke.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda''. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness The first games in the series]] had a number of Christian elements and imagery, most of which were [[{{Bowdlerise}} removed]] from localizations as a result of [=NoA=]'s policy against the depiction of religious elements:
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'': There's a cross engraved on Link's shield, and the Book of Magic was called "Bible" in Japan (this is especially evident from looking at its [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/4/46/TLoZ_Book_of_Magic_Artwork.png?version=072c7ff86c6faf9e0670e9aab765a143 official artwork]])
** ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'': Shields, gravestones and [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/c/cf/TAoL_Wizzrobe_Artwork.png?version=3a261d9746aec0dff3ec5421a27d8c32 Wizard enemies]] have crosses on them, and there's even a [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/3/35/TAoL_Cross_Artwork.png?version=56c1a106bc9bc1b93de1c4e4312b925a cross item]] that the player can collect.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'': In Japan, the Sanctuary was a Church, the sage there was a priest, Agahnim's deceit of the king involved claiming to be a priest sent by God (as opposed to a wizard), and there's [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/a/ab/LinkPraying.png?version=ad567538683c1ccb7c732c63bd90e856 this official artwork]] that depicts Link as a Christian praying in front of a crucifix. In addition, opening the entrance to the Desert Palace involves Link praying with church music in the background as he makes praying gestures with his hands.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' broke the trend by having Islamic elements instead. The Gerudo symbol depicted a crescent moon and star, very similar to the symbol of the Islamic faith. In addition, an Islamic prayer could be heard in the Fire Temple's background music. Both elements were removed from later versions of the game, which introduced a new Gerudo symbol being used. Said symbol was used by later games, effectively retconning the original symbol away.
* One part of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' traps your characters in an EldritchLocation called "The Fade", and you basically travel between various "areas" of the specific level that for some reason look like the Jewish Kabbalah.

to:

* ''JESUS: Dreadful Bio Monster'': After Joshua from ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' attacks with "Jesus Beams." [[spoiler:It looks as though it symbolizes his being God or Jesus, but he's really just the rise of the internet made this Japan-only game known lots of Western people were tempted to play this visual novel because it looked like if it was going to give a new view on Christianity. When they finally got their hands on it it turned out to be a visual novel that talked about aliens invading a space station. The only reason it has JESUS in the title Composer, which is because a position that is supervised by the name that they gave to the space station of the game.
* ''VideoGame/TheBeginnersGuide'': The narrator presents you with a series of short games that a friend of his has made, and sometimes makes changes to the code, to help demonstrate his theories on his friend's mental processes over the span of several years where said friend sinks into depression. [[spoiler: Or not. None of it is actually true. This tendency to see symbolism where there was none has driven the two apart, and the friend has even left behind a message telling the narrator that, because of this habit of showing these games (which
Producer. {{God}} wouldn't have been modified to fit the narrator's perceived symbolism) to other people, he can't enjoy making games anymore.]] This all goes over the narrator's head as he [[spoiler:pleads the players to help him find his friend back, so he can feel the validation of demonstrating the games, and his theories on them, to the public again.a superviser.]]
* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', this is {{Invoked}} by the Dunmeri PhysicalGod Vivec in his [[https://www.imperial-library.info/content/thirty-six-lessons-vivec-sermon-one Thirty-Six Lessons]] series. He uses ''oodles'' of biblical imagery to make sure that, if you take it seriously, there is NO WAY a person could see Vivec as anything less than the ''absolute god'' of ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe (which, of course, isn't necessarily true). Doubles with BreakingTheFourthWall, {{Anvilicious}}, Administrivia/TropesAreNotBad, ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'' and GettingCrapPastTheRadar with a sprinkling of InJoke.
* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZelda''. [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness The first games in the series]] had a number of Christian elements and imagery, most of which were [[{{Bowdlerise}} removed]] from localizations as a result of [=NoA=]'s policy against the depiction
''VideoGame/{{Xenosaga}}'' are notorious among VideoGames for being chock-full of religious elements:
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'': There's a cross engraved on Link's shield, and
symbolism. Matters are complicated by the Book of Magic was called "Bible" in Japan (this is especially evident from looking at its [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/4/46/TLoZ_Book_of_Magic_Artwork.png?version=072c7ff86c6faf9e0670e9aab765a143 official artwork]])
** ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'': Shields, gravestones and [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/c/cf/TAoL_Wizzrobe_Artwork.png?version=3a261d9746aec0dff3ec5421a27d8c32 Wizard enemies]] have crosses on them, and there's even a [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/3/35/TAoL_Cross_Artwork.png?version=56c1a106bc9bc1b93de1c4e4312b925a cross item]]
fact that the player can collect.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast'': In Japan,
core story really ''is'' based around religious symbolism--''Xenogears'' in particular is heavily inspired by the Sanctuary was a Church, the sage there was a priest, Agahnim's deceit Gnostic interpretation of Christianity. The creators have published writings that explain every symbol and layer of the king involved claiming to be a priest sent by God (as opposed to a wizard), and there's [[https://d1u5p3l4wpay3k.cloudfront.net/zelda_gamepedia_en/a/ab/LinkPraying.png?version=ad567538683c1ccb7c732c63bd90e856 story.
** Some of
this official artwork]] was lost in translation. The Elementals were named for four of the nine choirs of angels. Cherubina (Kelvena), Throne (Tolone), Seraphita and Dominia. Mr. Inferiority Complex Ramsus has a phonetic Japanese spelling that depicts Link as makes his surname pronounced like Rameses. And Miang's surname is a Christian praying in front of a crucifix. In addition, opening the entrance shout-out to the Desert Palace involves Link praying with church music Eve (Hawwa/Chavah).
** Since it's so deeply ingrained
in the background as he makes praying gestures with his hands.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' broke
story and how things play out, it's obvious the trend by having Islamic elements instead. The Gerudo symbol depicted a crescent moon writers of Xenogers DO understand Gnosticism... they just happened to twist it beyond recognition.
** ''Xenosaga'' is much more guilty of this, tossing around heady religious, philosophical, scientific
and star, very similar literary references willy-nilly that serve little to no coherent symbolic purpose - e.g. the symbol series of [[SuperRobot Super Robots]] named after the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
** Much of ''Xenosaga's'' symbolism can be understood if the gamer can significantly bend their understanding of some
of the Islamic faith. In addition, an Islamic prayer could be heard in key concepts of Jungian psychology, quantum physics, and Judeo-Christian theology. If this isn't possible... then the Fire Temple's background music. Both elements were removed from later versions whole thing is just a mess of references that are probably best left not understood.
** ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}'', ''VideoGame/XenobladeChroniclesX'', and ''VideoGame/XenobladeChronicles2'' all have plenty of Biblical symbolism, with varying degrees of relevance. This is lampshaded near the end of ''2'', when Malos finds out [[spoiler:that the true names
of the game, which introduced a new Gerudo symbol being used. Said symbol was used by later games, effectively retconning the original symbol away.
* One part of ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' traps your characters in an EldritchLocation called "The Fade",
three Aegises]] were Logos, Ontos, and you basically travel between various "areas" of the specific level Pneuma (Greek for Mind, Body, and Soul). When Malos asks what those names mean, he is snarkily told that for some reason look like they mean the Jewish Kabbalah. people who created them were pretentious fools.


* Ads for TV series with a sufficient ensemble cast occasionally riff on Leonardo Da Vinci's "Last Supper". The two most famous examples are likely those for the final seasons of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' and ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}''.

to:

* Ads for TV series with a sufficient ensemble cast occasionally riff on Leonardo Da Vinci's "Last Supper". The To name just two most famous examples are likely those for the final seasons of ''Series/{{Lost}}'' and ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}''.Galactica|2003}}'' shall be mentioned.


* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', this is {{Invoked}} by the Dunmeri PhysicalGod Vivec in his [[https://www.imperial-library.info/content/thirty-six-lessons-vivec-sermon-one Thirty-Six Lessons]] series. He uses ''oodles'' of biblical imagery to make sure that, if you take it seriously, there is NO WAY a person could see Vivec as anything less than the ''absolute god'' of ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe (which, of course, isn't necessarily true). Doubles with BreakingTheFourthWall, {{Anvilicious}}, TropesAreNotBad, and GettingCrapPastTheRadar with a sprinkling of InJoke.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', this is {{Invoked}} by the Dunmeri PhysicalGod Vivec in his [[https://www.imperial-library.info/content/thirty-six-lessons-vivec-sermon-one Thirty-Six Lessons]] series. He uses ''oodles'' of biblical imagery to make sure that, if you take it seriously, there is NO WAY a person could see Vivec as anything less than the ''absolute god'' of ''The Elder Scrolls'' universe (which, of course, isn't necessarily true). Doubles with BreakingTheFourthWall, {{Anvilicious}}, TropesAreNotBad, Administrivia/TropesAreNotBad, and GettingCrapPastTheRadar with a sprinkling of InJoke.


* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miroslav_%C5%A0atan Miroslav Šatan.]]

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miroslav_%C5%A0atan org/wiki/Miroslav_[=%C5%A0=]atan Miroslav Šatan.]]


* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miroslav_Šatan Miroslav Šatan.]]

to:

* [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miroslav_Šatan org/wiki/Miroslav_%C5%A0atan Miroslav Šatan.]]


** The 1967 story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E2TheAbominableSnowmen The Abominable Snowmen]]" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.

to:

** The 1967 story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E2TheAbominableSnowmen The Abominable Snowmen]]" uses most of its Buddhist symbolism reasonably considering it's set in a Buddhist monastery - like paralleling the Doctor's use of time travel to the monks' understanding of astral projection, or how the Doctor teaches Victoria to chant 'om mani padme hum' to resist [[{{Brainwashed}} Brainwashing]]. Not all of it joins up, though - significantly, the main antagonist ([[spoiler: actually just a puppet of the Intelligence]]) is named Padmasambhava, the writer of ''[[TomeOfEldrichLore The ''The Tibetan Book of the Dead]]'', a book known about at the time due to its recent appropriation by Timothy Leary for his [[HigherUnderstandingThroughDrugs writings about LSD]] - making it random drugs symbolism as well as random Buddhist symbolism. It's very unlikely that they would have had a character called [[TheUnpronounceable Padmasambhava]] in the story if it wasn't necessary to the story they were trying to tell, yet neither the drugs nor the religious allusion seems to have any significance.

Added DiffLines:

* The four helium-3 harvesters in ''Film/{{Moon}}'' are named [[Literature/TheBible Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John]]. What does this mean? Absolutely nothing. The screenwriter said that he just needed four names and those were the ones that came to mind; he could've just as easily called them [[Music/TheBeatles John, Paul, George, and Ringo]].

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