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Working In Formal Attire. For some reason, the characters are doing their jobs in clothing that is far more formal than appropriate. Getting to see the actors in formal outfits can be a form of {{fanservice}}.

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Working '''Working In Formal Attire. Attire'''
For some reason, the characters are doing their jobs in clothing that is far more formal than appropriate. Getting to see the actors in formal outfits can be a form of {{fanservice}}.{{fanservice}}.



* "Weren't you frightened?" "Frightened? Child, you're talking to a man who's laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom, and chuckled at catastrophe... I was petrified."

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* "Weren't you frightened?" "Frightened? Child, you're talking to a man who's laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom, and chuckled at catastrophe... I was petrified."


* In an episode of CSI, the investigators get called out of an awards banquet to the scene of a death at a posh prom party.

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* In an episode of CSI, the investigators get Grisssom gets called out of an awards banquet to the scene of a death at a posh prom party.party, leaving Catherine to make his speech in honor of Ecklie for him. She is not pleased.



* Not sure if this is a lampshading of a trope, or just a lampshade of the show's particular situation, but in the episode with the CSI TakeThat, an obsessive fan is outside the murder scene and asks Sharona to get her petition to the lead actor, complaining about the show changing theme songs. Sharona agrees that she hates when they do that. This, of course, was after ''Monk'' changed its theme from an instrumental to "It's a Jungle Out There". To hammer it in, at the end of the episode, the fan ends up at Monk's house at one in the morning, having shifted her obsession to Monk after he arrested the lead actor for the murder, tells him that he should get his own TV show some day, and then makes him promise that when he does, he'd never change the theme song. The old theme song then plays over the closing credits rather than the new one.

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* Not sure if this is a lampshading of a trope, or just a lampshade of the show's particular situation, but in the episode with the CSI TakeThat, an obsessive fan is outside the murder scene and asks Sharona to get her petition to the lead actor, complaining about the show changing theme songs. Sharona agrees that she hates when they do that. This, of course, was after ''Monk'' changed its theme from an instrumental to "It's a Jungle Out There". There." To hammer it in, at the end of the episode, the fan ends up at Monk's house at one in the morning, having shifted her obsession to Monk after he arrested the lead actor for the murder, tells him that he should get his own TV show some day, and then makes him promise that when he does, he'd never change the theme song. The old theme song then plays over the closing credits rather than the new one.



** One, the insane chaotic violence surrounding the characters in any given action scene, like selective character shields on flippin' steroids. If I were to name it, I'd probably say Jackson Heroics (as this also afflicts ''The Lord of the Rings'' at times, especially in ''Return of the King''.)
** Two, when people do die, usually there's a whole lot of people killed at once. Given the amount of people we've seen previously, it's pretty reasonable to guess that it would thin the group down to the central characters... but this is not the case. If I were to name it, I'd say... Regenerative Crew.

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** One, the insane chaotic violence surrounding the characters in any given action scene, like selective character shields on flippin' steroids. If I were to name it, I'd probably say Jackson Heroics (as this also afflicts ''The Lord of the Rings'' at times, especially in ''Return of the King''.)
King'').
** Two, when people do die, usually there's a whole lot of people killed at once. Given the amount of people we've seen previously, it's pretty reasonable to guess that it would thin the group down to the central characters... but this is not the case. If I were to name it, I'd say... Regenerative Crew.



* Just saw the latest episode, "New Year's Day", and I'd ''like'' to update the CruelTwistEnding page, but I'm not entirely sure if it's an example of that or KarmicTwistEnding... Help, anyone? The twist in question is that [[spoiler:the character we've been following throughout the whole episode was a zombie the whole time. The episode actually ends with what I shall call "Zombies In Loooove!"; she and a male zombie are seen holding hands, stalking a helpless woman]]... then the film "melts" for no reason. Speaking of degrading filmstrips, what trope does ''that'' one go under?

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* Just saw the latest episode, "New Year's Day", Day," and I'd ''like'' to update the CruelTwistEnding page, but I'm not entirely sure if it's an example of that or KarmicTwistEnding... KarmicTwistEnding...Help, anyone? The twist in question is that [[spoiler:the character we've been following throughout the whole episode was a zombie the whole time. The episode actually ends with what I shall call "Zombies In Loooove!"; she and a male zombie are seen holding hands, stalking a helpless woman]]... then the film "melts" for no reason. Speaking of degrading filmstrips, what trope does ''that'' one go under?


* In on of CSI:NY, Mac and Lindsay are called to a crime scene that Danny is already working. Mac shows up in a tux, having been at a benefit for the mayor. Lindsay arrives wearing a formal dress since she was at the opera. Danny comments about being underdressed.

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* In on one of CSI:NY, Mac and Lindsay are called to a crime scene that Danny is already working. Mac shows up in a tux, having been at a benefit for the mayor. Lindsay arrives wearing a formal dress since she was at the opera. Danny comments about being underdressed. In a later episode, Mac chases down and arrests a purse snatcher while dressed in a tux again; he's about to attend another formal event.

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* In on of CSI:NY, Mac and Lindsay are called to a crime scene that Danny is already working. Mac shows up in a tux, having been at a benefit for the mayor. Lindsay arrives wearing a formal dress since she was at the opera. Danny comments about being underdressed.


'''GreenLantern'''

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'''GreenLantern''''''ComicBook/GreenLantern'''


'''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''', continues from DidIJustSayThatOutLoud

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'''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''', '''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''', continues from DidIJustSayThatOutLoud


* In ''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry'', initially the plot sets up the female Captain Vivian Medlock as the BigBad, but even then, the plot focuses more on her [[TheDragon main enforcer]], the male Ralph Werec, as a villain. Then, about 2/3rds in, [[spoiler:he betrays her, revealing himself as the ''real'' villain. I am not certain if this is an example of FemalesAreMoreInnocent, as Medlock is not really given a sympathetic backstory to my knowledge, but the show seems to have the idea that, while women can be kickass ''heroines'' and good gals, a woman ''cannot'' be a good main villain- [[ARealManIsAKiller that's a man's job]]]]. There is probably a DoubleStandard trope to describe this, but I don't really know which one it is. Is there a trope that says that [[spoiler:a woman can't be a true villain, not because women are inherently good, but because they are incompetent as villains? Like Smart Heroines, Stupid Villainesses, Smart Male Villain?]]

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* In ''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry'', initially the plot sets up the female Captain Vivian Medlock as the BigBad, but even then, the plot focuses more on her [[TheDragon main enforcer]], the male Ralph Werec, as a villain. Then, about 2/3rds in, [[spoiler:he betrays her, revealing himself as the ''real'' villain. I am not certain if this is an example of FemalesAreMoreInnocent, as Medlock is not really given a sympathetic backstory to my knowledge, knowledge while Ralph ''is'', but the show seems to have the idea that, while women can be kickass ''heroines'' and good gals, a woman ''cannot'' be a good main villain- [[ARealManIsAKiller that's a man's job]]]]. There is probably a DoubleStandard trope to describe this, but I don't really know which one it is. Is there a trope that says that [[spoiler:a woman can't be a true villain, not because women are inherently good, but because they are incompetent as villains? Like Smart Heroines, Stupid Villainesses, Smart Male Villain?]]


* In ''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry'', initially the plot sets up the female Captain Vivian Medlock as the BigBad, but even then, the plot focuses more on her [[TheDragon main enforcer]], the male Ralph Werec, as a villain. [[spoiler:Then, about 2/3rds in, he betrays her, revealing himself as the ''real'' villain. I am not certain if this is an example of FemalesAreMoreInnocent, as Medlock is not really given a sympathetic backstory to my knowledge, but the show seems to have the idea that, while women can be kickass ''heroines'' and good gals, a woman ''cannot'' be a good main villain- [[ARealManIsAKiller that's a man's job]]]]. There is probably a DoubleStandard trope to describe this, but I don't really know which one it is. Is there a trope that says that [[spoiler:a woman can't be a true villain, not because women are inherently good, but because they are incompetent as villains? Like Smart Heroines, Stupid Villainesses, Smart Male Villain?]]

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* In ''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry'', initially the plot sets up the female Captain Vivian Medlock as the BigBad, but even then, the plot focuses more on her [[TheDragon main enforcer]], the male Ralph Werec, as a villain. [[spoiler:Then, Then, about 2/3rds in, he [[spoiler:he betrays her, revealing himself as the ''real'' villain. I am not certain if this is an example of FemalesAreMoreInnocent, as Medlock is not really given a sympathetic backstory to my knowledge, but the show seems to have the idea that, while women can be kickass ''heroines'' and good gals, a woman ''cannot'' be a good main villain- [[ARealManIsAKiller that's a man's job]]]]. There is probably a DoubleStandard trope to describe this, but I don't really know which one it is. Is there a trope that says that [[spoiler:a woman can't be a true villain, not because women are inherently good, but because they are incompetent as villains? Like Smart Heroines, Stupid Villainesses, Smart Male Villain?]]

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'''I know this is a sexist DoubleStandard, but which one?'''
* In ''Anime/StrainStrategicArmoredInfantry'', initially the plot sets up the female Captain Vivian Medlock as the BigBad, but even then, the plot focuses more on her [[TheDragon main enforcer]], the male Ralph Werec, as a villain. [[spoiler:Then, about 2/3rds in, he betrays her, revealing himself as the ''real'' villain. I am not certain if this is an example of FemalesAreMoreInnocent, as Medlock is not really given a sympathetic backstory to my knowledge, but the show seems to have the idea that, while women can be kickass ''heroines'' and good gals, a woman ''cannot'' be a good main villain- [[ARealManIsAKiller that's a man's job]]]]. There is probably a DoubleStandard trope to describe this, but I don't really know which one it is. Is there a trope that says that [[spoiler:a woman can't be a true villain, not because women are inherently good, but because they are incompetent as villains? Like Smart Heroines, Stupid Villainesses, Smart Male Villain?]]


The song "Belle" from the beginning of Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast is definitely one of these, but I'm not sure which.

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* The song "Belle" from the beginning of Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast is definitely one of these, but I'm not sure which.

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'''MorningRoutine or ADayInTheLife?'''
The song "Belle" from the beginning of Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast is definitely one of these, but I'm not sure which.



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** Close, but itís SequelDifficultySpike.



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** SweetAndSourGrapes.





* In the first two seasons of ''Series/{{Angel}}'', Angel, a vampire with a soul, wears black and other dark colors (as he does throughout the series), while Wesley, a former Watcher (which is like a Slayer's [[StarWars Jedi Master]]), wears a lot of light-colored clothing. Consequently, there's always a nice contrast when they stand next to each other, and it's hard not to think, WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic? Also, Wesley's wardrobe gets considerably darker as he becomes a darker character.

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* In the first two seasons of ''Series/{{Angel}}'', Angel, a vampire with a soul, wears black and other dark colors (as he does throughout the series), while Wesley, a former Watcher (which is like a Slayer's [[StarWars [[Franchise/StarWars Jedi Master]]), wears a lot of light-colored clothing. Consequently, there's always a nice contrast when they stand next to each other, and it's hard not to think, WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic? Also, Wesley's wardrobe gets considerably darker as he becomes a darker character.





** ''Maybe'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment not a good idea to have a trope like this]], lest it devolve into [[Administrivia/ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontLike Complaining About People You Don't Like]] or {{Flame War}}s.

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** ''Maybe'' [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment [[Administrivia/RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment not a good idea to have a trope like this]], lest it devolve into [[Administrivia/ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontLike Complaining About People You Don't Like]] or {{Flame War}}s.

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