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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond'': Terry is getting tired of balancing his normal life and superhero life and tries to tell Bruce he wants a break for at least one day. The latter isn't having any of it because Gotham will always need Batman.
-->'''Terry:''' One night's not gonna make any difference!\\
'''Bruce:''' ''[grabs him by his shirt]'' One night ''always'' makes the difference!

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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Sadly, this attitude has crept into U.S. politics. The other party's candidate (and voters, too, for that matter) is nothing less than evil incarnate. If he or she were to win the next election, it would spell inevitable and permanent doom for the nation, or even the entire world!
[[/folder]]


* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion from winning,]] but also needs to win every year to prevent oblivion from winning once.]]

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* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion [[EvilVersusOblivion prevent oblivion from winning,]] but also needs to win every year to prevent oblivion from winning once.]]


* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion from winning once.]]]]

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* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion from winning,]] but also needs to win every year to prevent oblivion from winning once.]]]]]]


* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion for everyone.]]]]

to:

* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed. Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion for everyone.from winning once.]]]]


* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed.]]

to:

* In ''Film/TheCabinInTheWoods'', [[spoiler:the Ancient Ones are kept asleep by giving them sacrifices. The sacrifices have to happen every year (there are numerous backups, and at least one has to succeed), but missing the deadline means the Ancient Ones wake up and the world is screwed.]] Played with in this case, as evil need only win once to [[EvilVersesOblivion prevent oblivion for everyone.]]]]


* In a sense, this trope is inverted with any game that has a [[VideoGameLives extra life system]]. In this case the ''player'' really only has to win the one time to beat the game. The antagonists have to keep winning in order to stop the player from doing so.
** Taken [[UpToEleven to its logical conclusion]] in ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'': Given enough [[{{Determinator}} determination]] [[spoiler:and in-universe SaveScumming]], the protagonist can never truly be defeated. If you take the VillainProtagonist route, the only hope of the heroes you fight is that you get bored or frustrated and quit. [[spoiler:And if you complete this route just once, your game will be forever ruined; even doing the pacifist route afterwards still results in the Fallen Child escaping the Underground and being able to wreak havoc on humanity. You can go so far as to alter or even delete the files on your computer, which will in fact allow you to earn the Pacifist ending again, but ''even then'' the game ''still knows you did that'' and will call you out on it. There's no escaping the consequences of allowing the Fallen Child a single victory -- after all, creating the most horrific, cruel ending scenario possible was entirely [[YouBastard your decision]].]]



* In a sense, this trope is inverted with any game that has a [[VideoGameLives extra life system]]. In this case the ''player'' really only has to win the one time to beat the game. The antagonists have to keep winning in order to stop the player from doing so.
** Taken [[UpToEleven to its logical conclusion]] in ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'': Given enough [[{{Determinator}} determination]] [[spoiler:and in-universe SaveScumming]], the protagonist can never truly be defeated. If you take the VillainProtagonist route, the only hope of the heroes you fight is that you get bored or frustrated and quit. [[spoiler:And if you complete this route just once, your game will be forever ruined; even doing the pacifist route afterwards still results in the Fallen Child escaping the Underground and being able to wreak havoc on humanity. You can go so far as to alter or even delete the files on your computer, which will in fact allow you to earn the Pacifist ending again, but ''even then'' the game ''still knows you did that'' and will call you out on it. There's no escaping the consequences of allowing the Fallen Child a single victory -- after all, creating the most horrific, cruel ending scenario possible was entirely [[YouBastard your decision]].]]


* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears, and whoever in the Belmont clan currently possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail... well, everyone's going to pay the price, but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good]]). It's even more apparent in that Dracula is also resurrected several times outside of this hundred-year loop (Shaft controlling Richter Belmont five years after ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Rondo of Blood]]'' to resurrect Dracula in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night]]'', the death and destruction caused by the UsefulNotes/{{World|WarI}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] bringing the castle back in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines Bloodlines]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', or the eponymous [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] utilizing glyphs to resurrect Dracula), but none of these obstruct the "fated" resurrections, which happen on their own regardless.

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* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears, and whoever in the Belmont clan currently possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail... well, everyone's going to pay the price, but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaChroniclesOfSorrow a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good]]). It's even more apparent in that Dracula is also resurrected several times outside of this hundred-year loop (Shaft controlling Richter Belmont five years after ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Rondo of Blood]]'' to resurrect Dracula in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night]]'', the death and destruction caused by the UsefulNotes/{{World|WarI}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] bringing the castle back in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines Bloodlines]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', or the eponymous [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] utilizing glyphs to resurrect Dracula), but none of these obstruct the "fated" resurrections, which happen on their own regardless.


* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears, and whoever in the Belmont clan currently possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail... well, everyone's going to pay the price, but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good). It's even more apparent in that Dracula is also resurrected several times outside of this hundred-year loop (Shaft controlling Richter Belmont five years after ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Rondo of Blood]]'' to resurrect Dracula in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night]]'', the death and destruction caused by the UsefulNotes/{{World|WarI}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] bringing the castle back in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines Bloodlines]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', or the eponymous [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] utilizing glyphs to resurrect Dracula), but none of these obstruct the "fated" resurrections, which happen on their own regardless.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears, and whoever in the Belmont clan currently possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail... well, everyone's going to pay the price, but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good).good]]). It's even more apparent in that Dracula is also resurrected several times outside of this hundred-year loop (Shaft controlling Richter Belmont five years after ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Rondo of Blood]]'' to resurrect Dracula in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night]]'', the death and destruction caused by the UsefulNotes/{{World|WarI}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] bringing the castle back in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines Bloodlines]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', or the eponymous [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] utilizing glyphs to resurrect Dracula), but none of these obstruct the "fated" resurrections, which happen on their own regardless.


* In Samurai Showdown 2, by the time you reach Mizuki Rashojin, she's created all kinds of havoc worldwide, killed Amakusa, completely subjugated [[GreaterScopeVillain Ambrosia]] (the very being who turned her evil in the first place), and opened an extremely scary-looking gateway. Defeat her or the whole world literally goes to Hell.

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* In Samurai Showdown 2, ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown II'', by the time you reach Mizuki Rashojin, she's created all kinds of havoc worldwide, killed Amakusa, completely subjugated [[GreaterScopeVillain Ambrosia]] (the very being who turned her evil in the first place), and opened an extremely scary-looking gateway. Defeat her or the whole world literally goes to Hell.

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has a version of this where the Ascians have been behind each of the many Calamities which led to the Umbral Ages of Hydaleyn. ''Heavensward'' reveals that they do this to revive their god Zodiark, the antithesis to Hydaleyn, and they need 13 pieces. One for each Calamity.


** Possibly inverted in the ending of [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal]]: [[spoiler:a good character can choose to embrace the divine power of Bhaal, purified by its evil essence, and become a power of goodness in the planes. While this doesn't stop evil per se from existing, nor murder as the current god of murder Cyric is still in charge, it stops specifically the Bhaal's taint, which caused so much suffering and havoc during the game, from infesting the world.]]

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** Possibly inverted averted in the ending of [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal]]: [[spoiler:a good character can choose to embrace the divine power of Bhaal, purified by its evil essence, and become a power of goodness in the planes. While this doesn't stop evil per se from existing, nor murder as the current god of murder Cyric is still in charge, it stops specifically the Bhaal's taint, which caused so much suffering and havoc during the game, from infesting the world.world once and for all.]]

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* Played straight in the ending of [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn]]: [[spoiler:the main character is facing moral challenges in Hell, with various choices each with two different possible outcomes, one is "good" and the other "evil", the latter representing a character following the nature of a spawn of the god of murder. Even a lawful good paladin that always made good deeds in the game and chooses the good choice in all trials but one, will instantly become evil, because for a single moment he/she succumbed to Bhaal's taint]].
** Possibly inverted in the ending of [[VideoGame/BaldursGateII Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal]]: [[spoiler:a good character can choose to embrace the divine power of Bhaal, purified by its evil essence, and become a power of goodness in the planes. While this doesn't stop evil per se from existing, nor murder as the current god of murder Cyric is still in charge, it stops specifically the Bhaal's taint, which caused so much suffering and havoc during the game, from infesting the world.]]


* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' is mentioned in the trope description, but it's actually more of a funny variant of the trope rather than a completely straight example. By the time the events of the original game play out (after being RetCanon'd by the movie), not only has evil already won once, but has been doing so for the past 500 years or so. The tournament that is being documented by the game is actually the tenth such tournament following a string of nine victories by current champion Goro. If the Earthrealm fighters fail to crown a champion of their own in this tournament, Shao Kahn and Outworld has free rein to invade and conquer Earthrealm. So in ''Mortal Kombat'''s case, it's "Evil Only Has To Win Ten Times...But This Is The Tenth Time." A look in the series' backstory reveals that the entire tournament [[spoiler:is actually rigged to keep anyone from uniting all of the Realms. The Elder Gods split the Realms to prevent the One Being from ever returning. Evil only has to win one more time...but the ones in charge won't let it win if they can help it.]]
* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears and whoever in the Belmont clan (except [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines the one time]] that Morris guy had it at the start of the 20th century) possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail...well, everyone's going to pay the price but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good).

to:

* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' is mentioned in the trope description, but it's actually more of a funny variant of the trope rather than a completely straight example. By the time the events of the original game play out (after being RetCanon'd by the movie), not only has evil already won once, but has been doing so for the past 500 years or so. The tournament that is being documented by the game is actually the tenth such tournament following a string of nine victories by current champion Goro. If the Earthrealm fighters fail to crown a champion of their own in this tournament, Shao Kahn and Outworld has free rein to invade and conquer Earthrealm. So in ''Mortal Kombat'''s case, it's "Evil Only Has To Win Ten Times...But This Is The Tenth Time." One More Time". A look in the series' backstory reveals that the entire tournament [[spoiler:is actually rigged to keep anyone from uniting all of the Realms. The Elder Gods split the Realms to prevent the One Being from ever returning. Evil only has to win one more time... but the ones in charge won't let it win if they can help it.]]
* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' operates on this principle, though so far it hasn't had to actually employ the trope. Every hundred years, Dracula's castle reappears reappears, and whoever in the Belmont clan (except [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines the one time]] that Morris guy had it at the start of the 20th century) currently possesses the Vampire Killer whip has to storm the castle and slap Dracula back to the abyss. Should they fail... well, everyone's going to pay the price price, but all Dracula has to do is wait another hundred years (a stone's throw in vampire time) and he gets to try all over again (until 1999 and a well-timed eclipse screwed him over for good).good). It's even more apparent in that Dracula is also resurrected several times outside of this hundred-year loop (Shaft controlling Richter Belmont five years after ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaRondoOfBlood Rondo of Blood]]'' to resurrect Dracula in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaSymphonyOfTheNight Symphony of the Night]]'', the death and destruction caused by the UsefulNotes/{{World|WarI}} [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Wars]] bringing the castle back in ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaBloodlines Bloodlines]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaPortraitOfRuin Portrait of Ruin]]'', or the eponymous [[VideoGame/CastlevaniaOrderOfEcclesia Order of Ecclesia]] utilizing glyphs to resurrect Dracula), but none of these obstruct the "fated" resurrections, which happen on their own regardless.


* In the LordOfTheRings TabletopGame/{{Risk}} game, this trope is the essential mechanic to the Good vs Evil gameplay mode. The One Ring moves along its path towards Mt Doom at the end of each turn. If an Evil player controls the territory it was in, they get a chance to find/claim it by rolling a 12 (or lower if they have other factors in play). Good wins if the game lasts long enough for the Ring to reach the end of the path, but Evil wins if they can even ''once'' find/claim the ring at any point during the game.

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* In the LordOfTheRings Literature/TheLordOfTheRings TabletopGame/{{Risk}} game, this trope is the essential mechanic to the Good vs Evil gameplay mode. The One Ring moves along its path towards Mt Doom at the end of each turn. If an Evil player controls the territory it was in, they get a chance to find/claim it by rolling a 12 (or lower if they have other factors in play). Good wins if the game lasts long enough for the Ring to reach the end of the path, but Evil wins if they can even ''once'' find/claim the ring at any point during the game.

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