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* Similarly, ''Series/SpartacusBloodAndSand'' suffers this to a great degree given its sheer InterplayOfSexAndViolence. While it does portray the Roman acceptance of sex acts like orgies accurately, it also includes practices like oral sex, lesbianism, and adultery among wives that historical Rome condemned. But of course, {{fanservice}} sells, and GirlOnGirlIsHot.

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* Similarly, ''Series/SpartacusBloodAndSand'' suffers this to a great degree given its sheer InterplayOfSexAndViolence. While it does portray Romans did have lots and lots of sex, the show still plays this trope straight in regards to its use of female on female relationships; while it wasn't unheard of for slaves to perform lesbian sexual acts in secret for their mistress's entertainment, and possible for her to join in, lesbianism was not considered appropriate by general society (in most cases, it was simply disbelieved to exist however). Male same-sex relations were legal, but frequently mocked and often socially unacceptable to some degree. The main issue for Romans was who penetrated in anal sex, with the latter usually being of a lower social class, younger or a slave. If a man of higher standing ''received'' anal sex this was considered a huge disgrace and could result in a loss of social status ("infamy"). This was the primary distinction in Roman acceptance of thought then on sexuality-"dominant" and "submissive", not the person's sex acts like orgies accurately, it also includes practices like oral or gender. In fairness, though this doesn't come up all the consensual relationships between men which we see are by non-Romans/slaves who probably wouldn't care. The ''Lex Scantinia'' might have penalized sex with a freeborn minor male, or taking receptive anal sex, lesbianism, though it's unclear (and was not enforced much if so, mostly in harassing opponents). Also a large sexual appetite, as the show has frequently, was condemned medically and adultery among wives that historical Rome condemned. But ethically (of any kind), which cuts against much of course, {{fanservice}} sells, and GirlOnGirlIsHot.the depiction (at least for Romans) though of course this doesn't mean it didn't happen.


* ''Film/ShakespeareInLove'': Viola gets off completely as a result of her affair, though going by the mores of the time her reputation would have been irretrievably ruined. In reality Lord Wessex most likely would have canceled their engagement. Plus, no one else would marry her due to the stigma. However, as he's desperate to get money, going through with it might not be wholly unrealistic (though he would want to insure she hadn't gotten pregnant by Shakespeare). On that note, there's no indication that she ever fears either pregnancy or [=STDs=], though the former would also cause her ruin and the latter could be deadly with syphilis then (it's theorized by some Shakespeare contracted it).

to:

* ''Film/ShakespeareInLove'': Viola gets off completely suffers no negative consequences as a result of her affair, though going by the mores of the time her reputation would have been irretrievably ruined. In reality Lord Wessex most likely would have canceled their engagement. Plus, no one else would marry her due to the stigma. However, as he's desperate to get money, going through with it might not be wholly unrealistic (though he would want to insure she hadn't gotten pregnant by Shakespeare). On that note, there's no indication that she ever fears either pregnancy or [=STDs=], though the former would also cause her ruin and the latter could be deadly with syphilis then (it's theorized by some Shakespeare contracted it).


* Subverted in the ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BecomingFree''. While Anna, Kristoff, and a few of the staff who noticed support Elsa's and Freya's SecretRelationship, it is made clear that same-gender romances are not acceptable in the 1840s. Freya was outright run out of her old town because she fell for a friend and kissed her (her friend [[IncompatibleOrientation didn't like her back]]).



* In the 1840s Arendelle of ''Fanfic/TheCutOfYourLoveNeverHurtsBaby'', same-gender marriage is legal, though not universally accepted. The queen trying to arrange a marriage between herself and a neighboring princess is unconventional but not something too outlandish.

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* ''Literature/KushielsLegacy'': It's the norm of D'Angeline society. It's considered rather strange if you don't, which is part of why the Cassiline Brotherhood is seen as overly strict and austere.


* ''Series/{{Rome}}'' was ''filled'' with sex and violence, supposedly historically vetted. But while the show prides itself on well-researched use of DeliberateValuesDissonance, it also makes a few mistakes. For example, oral sex, referenced frequently with its Western connotations, was considered vulgar and disgusting by the otherwise-licentious Romans.[[note]][[BlueAndOrangeMorality To be more precise, it was a matter of perceived social dominance - ''receiving'' oral sex was quite OK, ''giving'' it was vilified. The same went for anal sex]].[[/note]]

to:

* ''Series/{{Rome}}'' was ''filled'' with sex and violence, supposedly historically vetted. But while the show prides itself on well-researched use of DeliberateValuesDissonance, it also makes a few mistakes. For example, oral sex, referenced frequently with its Western connotations, was considered vulgar and disgusting by the otherwise-licentious Romans.[[note]][[BlueAndOrangeMorality To be more precise, it was a matter of perceived social dominance dominance]] - ''receiving'' oral sex was quite OK, ''giving'' it was vilified. The same went for For anal sex]].sex it was the opposite.[[/note]]



* ''[[WebOriginal/{{Planetcopia}}]]'', most of the creatures

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* ''[[WebOriginal/{{Planetcopia}}]]'', most of the creaturescreatures.


* ''Film/TheLegendOfZorro'' is set in mid-19th century California. The wealthy and socially prominent main characters (Antonio Banderas, Catherine Zeta-Jones) get divorced, and the woman continues to raise their son and is apparently still socially prominent. (And remember that this is Spanish-Mexican California, a ''Catholic'' culture, where divorce was even more intolerable than in Protestant countries, although loopholes did of course exist.)

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* ''Film/TheLegendOfZorro'' is set in mid-19th century California. The wealthy and socially prominent main characters (Antonio Banderas, Catherine Zeta-Jones) get divorced, and the woman continues to raise their son and is apparently still socially prominent. (And prominent (and remember that this is Spanish-Mexican California, a ''Catholic'' culture, where divorce was even more intolerable than in Protestant countries, although loopholes did of course exist.)exist).



* ''Film/{{Emmanuelle}}'': Emmanuelle is told that monogamy is dead and is seduced in having sex with both men and women.


* ''Film/{{Kinsey}}'' has a lot of fun playing with this one. It's 1947 and teaching human sexuality in public settings is forbidden, even at otherwise liberal state universities. In fact, Dr. Alfred Kinsey is a ''zoologist'' before beginning his infamous study. However, as Kinsey and his aides quickly discover, this hasn't prevented Americans of all varieties from "experimenting", and practitioners of masturbation, pedophilia, and [[BestialityIsDepraved worse]] soon come forward to tell them everything, some of them quite gleefully.
** This was a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinsey_Reports#Criticism major source]] of the RealLife criticism of his reports, as many of the more prudish people in society would not take part with the interviews, whereas populations like male prositutes and criminals were highly over-represented in his sample, leading many to question how representative his sample was of the population at large.

to:

* ''Film/{{Kinsey}}'' has a lot of fun playing with this one. It's 1947 and teaching human sexuality in public settings is forbidden, even at otherwise liberal state universities. In fact, Dr. Alfred Kinsey is a ''zoologist'' before beginning his infamous study. However, as Kinsey and his aides quickly discover, this hasn't prevented Americans of all varieties from "experimenting", and practitioners of masturbation, pedophilia, and [[BestialityIsDepraved worse]] soon come forward to tell them everything, some of them quite gleefully.
**
gleefully. This was a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinsey_Reports#Criticism major source]] of the RealLife criticism of his reports, as many of the more prudish people in society would not take part with the interviews, whereas populations like male prositutes prostitutes and criminals were highly over-represented in his sample, leading many to question how representative his sample was of the population at large.large.
* ''Film/ShakespeareInLove'': Viola gets off completely as a result of her affair, though going by the mores of the time her reputation would have been irretrievably ruined. In reality Lord Wessex most likely would have canceled their engagement. Plus, no one else would marry her due to the stigma. However, as he's desperate to get money, going through with it might not be wholly unrealistic (though he would want to insure she hadn't gotten pregnant by Shakespeare). On that note, there's no indication that she ever fears either pregnancy or [=STDs=], though the former would also cause her ruin and the latter could be deadly with syphilis then (it's theorized by some Shakespeare contracted it).


* ''Series/{{Rome}}'' was ''filled'' with sex and violence, supposedly historically vetted. But while the show prides itself on well-researched use of DeliberateValuesDissonance, it also makes a few mistakes. For example, oral sex, referenced frequently with its Western connotations, was considered vulgar and disgusting by the otherwise-licentious Romans.[[note]][[BlueAndOrangeMorality To be more precise, it was a matter of perceived social dominance - ''receiving'' oral sex was quite OK, ''giving'' it was villified]].[[/note]]

to:

* ''Series/{{Rome}}'' was ''filled'' with sex and violence, supposedly historically vetted. But while the show prides itself on well-researched use of DeliberateValuesDissonance, it also makes a few mistakes. For example, oral sex, referenced frequently with its Western connotations, was considered vulgar and disgusting by the otherwise-licentious Romans.[[note]][[BlueAndOrangeMorality To be more precise, it was a matter of perceived social dominance - ''receiving'' oral sex was quite OK, ''giving'' it was villified]].vilified. The same went for anal sex]].[[/note]]



* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'':
** There's no indication that Hunith lost any prestige for having a child out of wedlock or any indication that Merlin received any persecution for being born to her. In fact, when they discuss it in ''Sins Of The Father'', Arthur treats it like Merlin lost his father. Justified in that it's a family show and they couldn't ''say'' the word "bastard", much less discuss what it means. It's also a FantasyCounterpartCulture, so they can have whatever moral views the writers decide.
** Even more so with Morgana, not only [[spoiler:illegitimate daughter of Uther (and who therefore would not, by the way, be eligible for the throne), but the result of an adulterous affair with the wife of his best knight, Gorlois. Kings ''could'' legitimate their children (usually if they had no other heir), but he never does, and once she committed high treason by seizing the throne for herself, she'd have forfeited any chance]].[[note]]On the other hand medieval mores were in reality a good bit more relaxed than the official Church position would have one think. Commoners especially could be quite casual about such things. A woman ''could'' live down bearing an illegitimate child and a man ''would'' be pressured to provide for same but without anybody being cast into outer darkness. The upper classes might be more judgmental of their own but what the common folk got up too wouldn't faze them much. This also varied with nobles ([[DoubleStandard men, that is]]) who in some times and places were very open in regards to their mistresses, along with the children which resulted (those without children from their wives even often had them legitimated).[[/note]]


Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale-- a man is [[UnexpectedVirgin not a virgin]] too long past puberty, after all.)

to:

Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] (And very few people have thought to justify a sexually-free noblewoman by having her [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney pay people to shut up,]] or [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections have her family call her exploits "bad rumors.")]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead led to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, sex/virginity among commoners, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale-- a man is [[UnexpectedVirgin not a virgin]] too long past puberty, after all.)


* Similarly, ''Series/SpartacusBloodAndSand'' suffers this to a great degree given its sheer InterplayOfSexAndViolence. While it does portray the Roman acceptance of sex acts like orgies accurately, it also includes practices like oral sex, lesbianism, and adultery among wives that historical Rome condemned. But of course, {{Fanservice}} sells, and GirlOnGirlIsHot.
* Downplayed on an episode of ''Foyle's War'' with a gay, UsefulNotes/WW2-era RAF pilot. He feels a great deal of {{gayngst}} and has to stay closeted because he knows that if it gets out, they'll never let him fly another mission. He tries to get a girl to be [[TheBeard his beard]], but she's disgusted by him. It's a clever episode because the audience can see the tragedy of his situation without any AuthorFilibuster pointing it out. Still, it's only a partial aversion because Foyle himself, being the saintly gentleman that he is, has absolutely no problem with the fact that this guy is madly in love with Foyle, Jr. A bit of a stretch, but not completely implausible; while homosexual acts weren't legalized in the UK until 1967, efforts to decriminalize them had begun ten years earlier and public opinion began to shift earlier still, and, for example, Creator/NoelCoward was generally known to be gay. (The law against homosexual acts was not enforced very actively even by then -- Turing was prosecuted because he'd confessed to a policeman, and he'd been "out" to some of his colleagues since the War.)
* In BBC's ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'', true to the legend, Merlin is a bastard. This has absolutely no effect on his mother's or his own honor, and it's made clear by the end of Series 2 that his mother and father willingly had sex out of wedlock rather than it being a rape as it usually is in the legends. In a conversation between the two of them in "Sins of the Father", Arthur sees nothing wrong with Merlin not knowing his father, even comparing it to his own loss of a mother in childbirth. Then again, it doesn't seem intended to be historically accurate, [[FantasyCounterpartCulture since they're magic and everything]].[[note]]On the other hand medieval mores were in reality a good bit more relaxed than the official Church position would have one think. Commoners especially could be quite casual about such things. A woman ''could'' live down bearing an illegitimate child and a man ''would'' be pressured to provide for same but without anybody being cast into outer darkness. The upper classes might be more judgmental of their own but what the common folk got up too wouldn't faze them much. This also varied with nobles ([[DoubleStandard men, that is]]) who in some times and places were very open in regards to their mistresses, along with the children which resulted (those without children from their wives even often had them legitimated).[[/note]]

to:

* Similarly, ''Series/SpartacusBloodAndSand'' suffers this to a great degree given its sheer InterplayOfSexAndViolence. While it does portray the Roman acceptance of sex acts like orgies accurately, it also includes practices like oral sex, lesbianism, and adultery among wives that historical Rome condemned. But of course, {{Fanservice}} {{fanservice}} sells, and GirlOnGirlIsHot.
* Downplayed on an episode of ''Foyle's War'' with a gay, UsefulNotes/WW2-era RAF pilot. He feels a great deal of {{gayngst}} and has to stay closeted because he knows that if it gets out, they'll never let him fly another mission. He tries to get a girl to be [[TheBeard his beard]], but she's disgusted by him. It's a clever episode because the audience can see the tragedy of his situation without any AuthorFilibuster pointing it out. Still, it's only a partial aversion because Foyle himself, being the saintly gentleman that he is, has absolutely no problem with the fact that this guy is madly in love with Foyle, Jr. A bit of a stretch, but not completely implausible; while homosexual acts weren't legalized in the UK until 1967, efforts to decriminalize them had begun ten years earlier and public opinion began to shift earlier still, and, for example, Creator/NoelCoward was generally known to be gay. (The gay (the law against homosexual acts was not enforced very actively even by then -- Turing was prosecuted because he'd confessed to a policeman, and he'd been "out" to some of his colleagues since the War.)
War).
* In BBC's ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'', true to the legend, Merlin is a bastard. This has absolutely ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'':
** There's
no effect on his mother's or his own honor, and it's made clear by the end of Series 2 indication that his mother and father willingly had sex Hunith lost any prestige for having a child out of wedlock rather than it or any indication that Merlin received any persecution for being a rape as born to her. In fact, when they discuss it usually is in the legends. In a conversation between the two of them in "Sins of the Father", ''Sins Of The Father'', Arthur sees nothing wrong with treats it like Merlin lost his father. Justified in that it's a family show and they couldn't ''say'' the word "bastard", much less discuss what it means. It's also a FantasyCounterpartCulture, so they can have whatever moral views the writers decide.
** Even more so with Morgana,
not knowing only [[spoiler:illegitimate daughter of Uther (and who therefore would not, by the way, be eligible for the throne), but the result of an adulterous affair with the wife of his father, even comparing it to his own loss of a mother in childbirth. Then again, it doesn't seem intended to be historically accurate, [[FantasyCounterpartCulture since they're magic best knight, Gorlois. Kings ''could'' legitimate their children (usually if they had no other heir), but he never does, and everything]].once she committed high treason by seizing the throne for herself, she'd have forfeited any chance]].[[note]]On the other hand medieval mores were in reality a good bit more relaxed than the official Church position would have one think. Commoners especially could be quite casual about such things. A woman ''could'' live down bearing an illegitimate child and a man ''would'' be pressured to provide for same but without anybody being cast into outer darkness. The upper classes might be more judgmental of their own but what the common folk got up too wouldn't faze them much. This also varied with nobles ([[DoubleStandard men, that is]]) who in some times and places were very open in regards to their mistresses, along with the children which resulted (those without children from their wives even often had them legitimated).[[/note]]


Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale-- a man is not a virgin too long past puberty, after all.)

to:

Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale-- a man is [[UnexpectedVirgin not a virgin virgin]] too long past puberty, after all.)


Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale--AManIsNotAVirgin too long past puberty, after all.)

to:

Additionally, this may vary for social classes within the ''same'' culture; the virginity of women with BlueBlood was important not only because a noblewoman functioned as a living bargaining chip or political merger, but to distinguish them from the lower classes as [[VirginPower untouched and pure.]] The sex life of a farmer/townswoman would basically be BeneathNotice to those of high status, since nobody was counting on her to make royal babies or cement an alliance with troublesome rivals. Of course, while it would often lead to a more relaxed view of sex/virginity, it also had the harsh cultural side-effect of making nobles think [[ValuesDissonance "peasant women are easy sluts" or "anyone can screw a farmgirl, it's not like they're important anyway."]] (Also note that this would be frequently if not AlwaysFemale--AManIsNotAVirgin AlwaysFemale-- a man is not a virgin too long past puberty, after all.)


* Subverted in the ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BecomingFree''. While Anna, Kristoff, and a few of the staff who noticed support Elsa's and Freya's SecretRelationship, it is made clear that same-gender romances are not acceptable in the 1840s. Freya was outright run out of her old town because she fell for a friend and kissed her (she [[IncompatibleOrientation didn't like her back]]).
* For characters living in the 1980s, the characters in the ''Ranma 1/2'' oneshot ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/13305459/1/Everything-s-Changing Everything's Changing]]'' are pretty accepting on queer issues. Akane's {{transgender}} feelings aren't given much note and neither is the relationship between Ranma and Akane. They even use terms like [[{{Asexuality}} ace-spectrum]], which didn't become commonplace until the 2010s.

to:

* Subverted in the ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BecomingFree''. While Anna, Kristoff, and a few of the staff who noticed support Elsa's and Freya's SecretRelationship, it is made clear that same-gender romances are not acceptable in the 1840s. Freya was outright run out of her old town because she fell for a friend and kissed her (she (her friend [[IncompatibleOrientation didn't like her back]]).
* For characters living in the 1980s, the characters in the ''Ranma 1/2'' oneshot ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/13305459/1/Everything-s-Changing Everything's Changing]]'' are pretty accepting on queer issues. Akane's {{transgender}} feelings aren't given much note and neither is the relationship between Ranma and Akane. They even use terms like [[{{Asexuality}} ace-spectrum]], "[[{{Asexuality}} ace-spectrum]]", which didn't become commonplace until the 2010s.2010s.
* In the 1840s Arendelle of ''Fanfic/TheCutOfYourLoveNeverHurtsBaby'', same-gender marriage is legal, though not universally accepted. The queen trying to arrange a marriage between herself and a neighboring princess is unconventional but not something too outlandish.

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[[/folder]]

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[[folder: Web Original]]
*''[[WebOriginal/{{Planetcopia}}]]'', most of the creatures

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