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** The ''[[VideoGame/UFOAfterBlank]]'' deserves special mention for literally having the encyclopedia written as reports given to a commanding officer. In the first game in particular, the entry for the alien weapons specifically include "you hold it here, and pull the trigger here, and the energy beam is emitted here" in a text-only report.

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** The ''[[VideoGame/UFOAfterBlank]]'' ''VideoGame/UFOAfterBlank'' series deserves special mention for literally having the encyclopedia written as reports given to a commanding officer. In the first game in particular, the entry for the alien weapons specifically include "you hold it here, and pull the trigger here, and the energy beam is emitted here" in a text-only report.

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** ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' and ''VideoGame/XCOM2'', however, do not have an official in-game encyclopedia, meaning there's no information on the basic XCOM equipment like there is in the original games from the 90's. However, every time a research project is finished, you're given a report on the project, which usually includes information that is not specific to the game mechanics (for example, Cyberdisks are stated to include a small amount of conventional biological material, but mostly seem to somehow be a silicon-based lifeform), fleshing out the lore and providing some {{Foreshadowing}} on the motivations of the alien invaders. [[spoiler: The reports are lost in the destruction of XCOM headquarters in the canonical end of the first game, though XCOM rebuilds and improves on their knowledge in the second game.]]
** The ''[[VideoGame/UFOAfterBlank]]'' deserves special mention for literally having the encyclopedia written as reports given to a commanding officer. In the first game in particular, the entry for the alien weapons specifically include "you hold it here, and pull the trigger here, and the energy beam is emitted here" in a text-only report.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Fanfic/VigilantesDawn'': Every chapter begins with an excerpt from a book written by one of Oliver and Laurel's descendants, published one hundred years in the future.


* The ''Encyclopedia Galactica'', Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series.

to:

* The Creator/IsaacAsimov:
** "Literature/BlindAlley": ''Essays on History'', by Ligurn Vier, provides an {{Epigraph}} for this story when it was published in ''Magazine/TheEarlyAsimov''. This FictionalDocument and author also appears in some early (1940s) publications of ''Literature/TheFoundationTrilogy'' stories.
-->"Only once in Galactic History was an intelligent race of non-Humans discovered--" -- ''Essays on History'', by Ligurn Vier
** ''{{Literature/Foundation}}'': Terminus is founded based on the premise that they will be collecting all of history and science into a single reference volume, an
''Encyclopedia Galactica'', Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series.Galactica''. Said volume is used to illustrate certain setting details relevant to the story/chapter it prefaces as an {{Epigraph}}. More specifically, the 116th edition, published in [[AlternativeCalendar 1020 F.E.]] In "Literature/TheEncyclopedists", the colonists learn that Hari Seldon had tricked them, and that he never expected any volumes to be published. Despite this, they continue to collate information and publish revisions as InUniverse ScienceMarchesOn and TechnologyMarchesOn. In ''Literature/FoundationsEdge'', Golan Trevise mentions the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' is now [[TheWikiRule a continually updated computer archive]] (an idea predating the establishment of ''Wiki/{{Wikipedia}}'', ''Microsoft Encarta'' or ''Encyclopedia Britannica Online'').
*** "Literature/ThePsychohistorians": This story expands the role that the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' plays, providing excerpts from the entries for Hari Seldon, Trantor, Psychohistory, and The Commission of Public Safety. It also establishes the book as the objective pursued by everyone [[ReassignedToAntarctica sent to Terminus]].
*** "Literature/TheEncyclopedists": When published in ''Literature/Foundation1951'', this story is prefaced by the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' entry for Terminus.
*** "Literature/TheTraders": When published in ''Literature/Foundation1951'', this story is prefaced by the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' entry for the Traders.
*** "Literature/TheMule": When published in ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', two ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' entries were added. Chapter 11 (first chapter of "The Mule") has an entry on the Mule, and chapter 22 has an entry on Neotrantor.


* ''Webcomic/FoundationThePsychohistorians'': This adaptation expands the details given by some of the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' entries, since they're displayed as [[TheWikiRule a computer window]] with [[OurGraphicsWillSuckInTheFuture extremely plain graphics, like what you might find in the 1980s]] instead of paragraphs that can start/end with ellipsis.



* In the Literature/WhateleyUniverse, the author of the Phase novels often does this, with quotes from rock songs as lead-ins for chapters. But the quotes are usually from the fictional band Brass Monkey, so they can be as relevant as the author wants.

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* In the Literature/WhateleyUniverse, the ''Literature/WhateleyUniverse'': The author of the Phase novels often does this, with quotes from rock songs as lead-ins for chapters. But the quotes are usually from the fictional band Brass Monkey, so they can be as relevant as the author wants.


* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': One of Nol Lapp's revolutionary themed poems is used as the intro to an issue focusing on WonderWoman leading a revolution against a slave trading empire.

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* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': One of Nol Lapp's revolutionary themed poems is used as the intro to an issue focusing on WonderWoman Franchise/WonderWoman leading a revolution against a slave trading empire.

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* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': One of Nol Lapp's revolutionary themed poems is used as the intro to an issue focusing on WonderWoman leading a revolution against a slave trading empire.


* Creator/RobertEHoward puts epigraphs of dramatically manly poetry before each chapter of ''Literature/ThePhoenixOnTheSword'', but does not do this for other Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian stories.
* Creator/BrandonSanderson uses this trope with his longer ''[[Literature/TheCosmere Cosmere]]'' works. Specifically:
** In the ''[[Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy Mistborn Trilogy]]'', each book has epigraphs that are taken from an in-universe text that the characters discover at some point in the story.
** In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', each section of each book follows a theme, from ancient texts to letters to quotations from the dying, all in-universe sources.
* Creator/{{Carl Sagan}}'s ''Cosmos'' presents three extracts from the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' about three intelligent species of the Milky Way, detailing among other things data on its home star and planet, biochemistry, mean mass and lifetime, and survival probability within a determinate amount of time [[spoiler: We're the third species detailed there and things look bleak for our future existence.]]
* In Donald Kingsbury's ''Literature/CourtshipRite'', each chapter starts with a quote from a fictional historical or religious document of Geta. Many of them are charmingly disturbing.



* Some ''Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse'' novels have these. ''Theatre of War'' has excerpts from its fictional playwright's work, and scholarly works about his plays and theatre in general. ''The Also People'' quotes fictional pop songs, including regular DWEU [[TheGhost unseen background character]] Johnny Chess, Silurian punk ("Outta My Way, [[SonOfAnApe Monkeyboy]]" by Third Eye), and Cyberman blues ("Tears of Rust" by Cyberblind).



* ''Literature/ElementalLogic'': Each section of ''Fire Logic'' is prefaced by quotes from three imaginary books: Mackapee's ''Principles for Community'', Mabin's ''Warefare'', and Medric's ''History of My Father's People''. Mackapee was an ancient earth witch whose book became the basis of Shaftali culture and ideals. Mabin is a leader of LaResistance who is becoming very like the Sainnite invaders she so hates. And Medric, son a Sainnite man and a Shaftali woman, is trying to make peace between both peoples, because he realizes that the alternative is the destruction of both the Sainnites in Shaftal and much of Shaftali culture. Their views suggest the past, present, and future of the country, and the writing and distribution of Medric's book is a major plot in the sequel.



* ''Literature/TheGrimnoirChronicles'' uses quotes from a variety of sources at the beginning of each chapter. Some are from or about characters in the books, but many just fill in details of the world, such as UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt dying in combat against the Kaiser's zombies in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.
* ''Literature/HeroicsForBeginners'': Each chapter starts with a quote from ''The Handbook of Practical Heroics'' that happens to be relevant to the events of the chapter.



* The ''Literature/PriscillaHutchins'' series uses journal entries, newspaper clippings, and the like to give you some perspective on the story, with two unusual features: one, the entries appear at the ''end'' of a chapter, to give you some perspective on what you just read, and two, you occasionally get a whole list of newspaper headlines, which not only gives you a broader perspective on the setting, but lets you see how far up list of top stories the story you're following has gotten.



* Played with in Creator/KeithLaumer's ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' series. Many of the stories start with an excerpt from the official records of the CDT, explaining the story you're about to read. The official version never comes ''close'' to describing what actually happened, and Retief is rarely mentioned, let alone given credit for saving the day.



* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes from the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas the Rhymer" in this way.

to:

* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes ''Literature/TheStoneDanceOfTheChameleon'' prefaces all its chapters with excerpts from in-universe documents, most often the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas writings of the Rhymer" in this way.Wise.
* Creator/CharlesSheffield's ''Summertide'' (book 1 of the Heritage Universe) has excerpts from Lang's Catalogue of Builder Artifacts to explain the mysterious structures mentioned throughout the book. Extra points to the fact that the author of the catalogue is a main character.



* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes from the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas the Rhymer" in this way.




* Creator/RobertEHoward puts epigraphs of dramatically manly poetry before each chapter of ''[[Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian The Phoenix On The Sword]]'', but does not do this for other Conan stories.
* Creator/CharlesSheffield's ''Summertide'' (book 1 of the Heritage Universe) has excerpts from Lang's Catalogue of Builder Artifacts to explain the mysterious structures mentioned throughout the book. Extra points to the fact that the author of the catalogue is a main character.
* Literature/TheGrimnoirChronicles uses quotes from a variety of sources at the beginning of each chapter. Some are from or about characters in the books, but many just fill in details of the world, such as UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt dying in combat against the Kaiser's zombies in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI.
* Played with in Creator/KeithLaumer's ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' series. Many of the stories start with an excerpt from the official records of the CDT, explaining the story you're about to read. The official version never comes ''close'' to describing what actually happened, and Retief is rarely mentioned, let alone given credit for saving the day.
* Some ''Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse'' novels have these. ''Theatre of War'' has excerpts from its fictional playwright's work, and scholarly works about his plays and theatre in general. ''The Also People'' quotes fictional pop songs, including regular DWEU [[TheGhost unseen background character]] Johnny Chess, Silurian punk ("Outta My Way, [[SonOfAnApe Monkeyboy]]" by Third Eye), and Cyberman blues ("Tears of Rust" by Cyberblind).
* In Donald Kingsbury's ''Literature/CourtshipRite'', each chapter starts with a quote from a fictional historical or religious document of Geta. Many of them are charmingly disturbing.
* The ''Literature/PriscillaHutchins'' series uses journal entries, newspaper clippings, and the like to give you some perspective on the story, with two unusual features: one, the entries appear at the ''end'' of a chapter, to give you some perspective on what you just read, and two, you occasionally get a whole list of newspaper headlines, which not only gives you a broader perspective on the setting, but lets you see how far up list of top stories the story you're following has gotten.
* ''Literature/TheStoneDanceOfTheChameleon'' prefaces all its chapters with excerpts from in-universe documents, most often the writings of the Wise.
* ''Literature/HeroicsForBeginners'': Each chapter starts with a quote from ''The Handbook of Practical Heroics'' that happens to be relevant to the events of the chapter.
* Creator/BrandonSanderson uses this trope with his longer works. Specifically:
** In the [[Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy Mistborn Trilogy]] each book has epigraphs that are taken from an in-universe text that the characters discover at some point in the story.
** In Literature/TheStormlightArchive each section of each book follows a theme, from ancient texts to letters to quotations from the dying, all in-universe sources.
* Each section of ''[[Literature/ElementalLogic Fire Logic]]'' is prefaced by quotes from three imaginary books: Mackapee's ''Principles for Community'', Mabin's ''Warefare'', and Medric's ''History of My Father's People''. Mackapee was an ancient earth witch whose book became the basis of Shaftali culture and ideals. Mabin is a leader of LaResistance who is becoming very like the Sainnite invaders she so hates. And Medric, son a Sainnite man and a Shaftali woman, is trying to make peace between both peoples, because he realizes that the alternative is the destruction of both the Sainnites in Shaftal and much of Shaftali culture. Their views suggest the past, present, and future of the country, and the writing and distribution of Medric's book is a major plot in the sequel.
* Creator/{{Carl Sagan}}'s ''Cosmos'' presents three extracts from the ''Encyclopedia Galactica'' about three intelligent species of the Milky Way, detailing among other things data on its home star and planet, biochemistry, mean mass and lifetime, and survival probability within a determinate amount of time [[spoiler: We're the third species detailed there and things look bleak for our future existence]]


[[folder: Anime & Manga ]]
* ''Manga/{{One Piece}}'' brought up such exorts when presenting Little Garden and a ship falling from the sky

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[[folder: Anime [[folder:Anime & Manga ]]
Manga]]
* ''Manga/{{One Piece}}'' brought up such exorts excerpts when presenting Little Garden and a ship falling from the skysky.



[[folder: Comic Books ]]

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[[folder: Comic Books ]][[folder:Comic Books]]



[[folder: Fan Fiction ]]

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[[folder: Fan Fiction ]][[folder:Fanfiction]]



* The ''Encyclopedia Galactica'', Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series.
* ''The Book of Counted Sorrows'', Creator/DeanKoontz, repeatedly.
* ''The Book of Counted Joys'', Creator/DeanKoontz, not quite as often.
* The Secret Book of Cadwallon the Druid, ''Literature/{{Deverry}}''.
* Princess Irulan's histories in ''Literature/{{Dune}}''. All of Frank Herbert's ''Dune'' novels make use of this, quoting from fictional (auto)biographies, treatises on religion/politics, journals...
** Almost every other major work by Herbert.
* Orson Scott Card does this in ''Literature/EndersGame'' and ''Literature/SpeakerForTheDead''.
* A few sources of the {{epigraph}}s in Creator/KatherineKurtz's works are from within the ''Literature/{{Deryni}}'' universe. The first chapter of ''Deryni Checkmate'' has an epigraph from a "St. Veneric" which mentions the fickleness of Gwynedd's weather in March, and chapter fifteen of the same book has this from an unknown Deryni monk: "The humans kill what they do not understand."
* The Guide itself, ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy.''
** And sometimes the ''Encyclopaedia Galactica'' in the series, although the Guide has the major selling point of being slightly cheaper and having "'''Don't Panic'''" printed in large friendly letters on the cover (as well as not taking up a parking lot).
** Also subverted; sometimes the Guide's entries are full of non-sequiturs and gags completely irrelevant to the story. Sometimes these are never mentioned again, and sometimes they become plot-critical {{brick joke}}s as a double-subversion.
* The biography of Literature/ThursdayNext, and several other fictional documents, in the ''Thursday Next'' series.
* Every chapter in the ''Literature/NurseryCrime'' series begins this way. The first book uses quotes from various local newspapers, while the second book draws exclusively from ''The Bumper Book of Berkshire Records''.
* The introduction to Michael Crichton's ''Literature/TheAndromedaStrain'' is written as an introduction to some official report of the events of the novel. All his novels after that one followed suit.
* Juliet [=McKenna=] likes them even more; she prefaces nearly every chapter with a fictional document, some of them only tangentially relevant.



* ''Literature/AmericanGods'' has quotations from a book being written by one of the characters, Mr Ibis.
* The introduction to Michael Crichton's ''Literature/TheAndromedaStrain'' is written as an introduction to some official report of the events of the novel. All his novels after that one followed suit.
%%* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' does this in a couple of books.
* Several of the novels in the ''Literature/ArrivalsFromTheDark'' and ''Trevelyan's Mission'' series make use of fictional texts to provide exposition, which doesn't stop the protagonist from repeating some of those facts later. In particular, ''The Faraway Saikat'' has every chapter end with a passage from one of the four or five fictional books on the [[HumanAliens Kni'lina]] mentioned early on, describing the race's history, politics, culture, and religion (for example, ''Analogies between Buddhism and Yezdan'tabi'' by Pal Bonjipadhal).



* The title and chapter pages of Creator/StephenKing's more epic novels quote anything and everything from T.S. Eliot and Thomas Wolfe to Blue Oyster Cult and King's own fictional characters.
* The ''[[Literature/RealmOfTheElderlings Farseer]]'' and ''Tawny Man'' trilogies by Creator/RobinHobb.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' humorous fantasy novels written by Robert Lynn Asprin. Each chapter has a fictitious quote. An example might be something like, "Violence is never the right thing to do" - Attila the Hun.
** Asprin has commented that he bitterly came to regret doing this, as making up all the quotes proved to be the hardest part of writing the novels. The later books in the series drop the practice.
* Jack [=McKinney's=] ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'' [[TieInNovel Tie-In Novels]] use quotes from various in-universe sources to comment on the events of each chapter.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes from the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas the Rhymer" in this way.
* The prologue of ''[[Literature/YoungWizards So You Want To Be A Wizard]]'' quotes extensively from the [[GreatBigBookOfEverything wizard's manual]] in order establish what wizards are and how [[InsistentTerminology wizardry]] works.
** The ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series in general contains a few quotes from the ''Book of Night with Moon''.
* ''Literature/AmericanGods'' has quotations from a book being written by one of the characters, Mr Ibis.
* ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'' did this frequently; the characters often debated the relative merits of the books.

to:

* The title and chapter pages of Creator/StephenKing's more epic novels quote anything and everything from T.S. Eliot and Thomas Wolfe to Blue Oyster Cult and King's own fictional characters.
* The ''[[Literature/RealmOfTheElderlings Farseer]]'' and ''Tawny Man'' trilogies by Creator/RobinHobb.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' humorous fantasy novels written by Robert Lynn Asprin. Each chapter
''Literature/CatsCradle'' has a fictitious quote. An example might be something like, "Violence is never the right thing to do" - Attila the Hun.
** Asprin has commented that he bitterly came to regret doing this, as making up all the quotes proved to be the hardest part of writing the novels. The later books in the series drop the practice.
* Jack [=McKinney's=] ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'' [[TieInNovel Tie-In Novels]] use quotes from various in-universe sources to comment on the events of each chapter.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes
excerpts from the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas the Rhymer" in this way.
* The prologue
Books of ''[[Literature/YoungWizards So You Want To Be A Wizard]]'' quotes extensively from the [[GreatBigBookOfEverything wizard's manual]] in order establish what wizards are and how [[InsistentTerminology wizardry]] works.
** The ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series in general contains a few quotes from the ''Book of Night with Moon''.
* ''Literature/AmericanGods'' has quotations from a book being written by one of the characters, Mr Ibis.
* ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'' did this frequently; the characters often debated the relative merits of the books.
Bokonon to explain Bokononist philosophy.



* Every chapter in the ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' series opens with one or two quotes from InUniverse works, many of which are philosophical or historical in nature. One notable such work is a history of the events of the first trilogy, written after the fact by Drusas Achamian, one of the main characters, which makes the first trilogy also a mild case of DirectLineToTheAuthor.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': In-universe books are often quoted before the prologue or after the epilogue of a book. Typically, the quotations are from history books written after the end of the series, or prophecies written long before.
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' does this in a couple of books.
* ''Literature/{{Redwall}}''
* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves''. Either half of it, or all of it, or if you're really brave, none of it.
* Creator/RobertRankin has ''The Suburban Book of the Dead'', the rewritten ''Suburban Book of the Dead'', works by the guru's guru Hugo Rune, and works ''about'' Hugo Rune by Sir John Rimmer. And that's just for starters.
* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' features epigraphs from ''The Book of Nome'' (a CargoCult religious text) in the first two books and ''A Scientific Encyclopedia For The Enquiring Young Nome'' (which misunderstands things almost as much, but in a different way) in the third.
** ''Discworld/AHatFullOfSky'' starts with an excerpt from ''Fairies and How to Avoid Them''. It also contains part of a text on capturing hivers, although that stops when the writer goes crazy and, it's implied, gets more or less vaporized.
* Cantra yos'Phelium's logbook in the ''[[Literature/LiadenUniverse Liaden]]'' series.

to:

* A few sources of the {{epigraph}}s in Creator/KatherineKurtz's works are from within the ''Literature/{{Deryni}}'' universe. The first chapter of ''Deryni Checkmate'' has an epigraph from a "St. Veneric" which mentions the fickleness of Gwynedd's weather in March, and chapter fifteen of the same book has this from an unknown Deryni monk: "The humans kill what they do not understand."
* The Secret Book of Cadwallon the Druid, ''Literature/{{Deverry}}''.
* Every chapter in the ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' series opens of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'' starts with one or two quotes an extract from InUniverse works, many of which are philosophical or historical in nature. One notable such work is a history of the events of the first trilogy, written after the fact by Drusas Achamian, one of the main characters, which makes the first trilogy also a mild case of DirectLineToTheAuthor.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': In-universe books are often quoted before the prologue or after the epilogue of a book. Typically, the quotations are from history books written after the end of the series, or prophecies written long before.
* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' does this in a couple of books.
* ''Literature/{{Redwall}}''
* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves''. Either half of it, or all of it, or if you're really brave, none of it.
* Creator/RobertRankin has ''The Suburban Book of the Dead'', the rewritten ''Suburban Book of the Dead'', works by the guru's guru Hugo Rune, and works ''about'' Hugo Rune by Sir John Rimmer. And that's just for starters.
* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' features epigraphs from
either ''The Book of Nome'' (a CargoCult religious text) in the first two books True Names'', which speaks about species of dinosaurs and their applications in society, or ''A Scientific Encyclopedia For The Enquiring Primer to Paradise for the Improvement of Young Nome'' (which misunderstands things almost as much, but in a different way) in Minds'', which focuses on the third.
** ''Discworld/AHatFullOfSky'' starts with an excerpt
FantasyPantheon of Paradise.
* Princess Irulan's histories in ''Literature/{{Dune}}''. All of Frank Herbert's ''Dune'' novels make use of this, quoting
from ''Fairies and How to Avoid Them''. It also contains part of a text fictional (auto)biographies, treatises on capturing hivers, although that stops when the writer goes crazy and, it's implied, gets more or less vaporized.
* Cantra yos'Phelium's logbook in the ''[[Literature/LiadenUniverse Liaden]]'' series.
religion/politics, journals...
** Almost every other major work by Herbert.



* The ''Literature/DaughterOfTheLioness'' have quotes of useful bits of advice Aly got at the start of each chapter - stuff from books, people she knows, etc. One example is Daine telling her that the Gods can sense lies, but if you don't make them suspicious enough to read your mind, they won't know if you [[LieOfOmission left something out]].
* ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr''. "A Season for Slaughter" heads each chapter with [[InfoDump extensive]] quotes from the "Red Book", a guide to the alien invaders to which the protagonist has contributed heavily.

to:

* Orson Scott Card does this in ''Literature/EndersGame'' and ''Literature/SpeakerForTheDead''.
* The ''Literature/DaughterOfTheLioness'' have quotes of useful bits of advice Aly got at the start of each chapter - stuff from books, people she knows, etc. One example is Daine telling her that the Gods can sense lies, but if you don't make them suspicious enough to read your mind, they won't know if you [[LieOfOmission left something out]].
* ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr''. "A Season for Slaughter" heads each chapter with [[InfoDump extensive]] quotes from the "Red Book", a guide to the alien invaders to which the protagonist has contributed heavily.
''Encyclopedia Galactica'', Creator/IsaacAsimov's ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series.



* The Guide itself, ''Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy''.
** And sometimes the ''Encyclopaedia Galactica'' in the series, although the Guide has the major selling point of being slightly cheaper and having "'''Don't Panic'''" printed in large friendly letters on the cover (as well as not taking up a parking lot).
** Also subverted; sometimes the Guide's entries are full of non-sequiturs and gags completely irrelevant to the story. Sometimes these are never mentioned again, and sometimes they become plot-critical {{brick joke}}s as a double-subversion.
* ''Literature/HouseOfLeaves''. Either half of it, or all of it, or if you're really brave, none of it.
* ''Literature/JonathanStrangeAndMrNorrell'' did this frequently; the characters often debated the relative merits of the books.
* The title and chapter pages of Creator/StephenKing's more epic novels quote anything and everything from T.S. Eliot and Thomas Wolfe to Blue Oyster Cult and King's own fictional characters.
* Creator/DeanKoontz:
** ''The Book of Counted Sorrows'', repeatedly.
** ''The Book of Counted Joys'', not quite as often.
* Cantra yos'Phelium's logbook in the ''[[Literature/LiadenUniverse Liaden]]'' series.
* Juliet [=McKenna=] likes them even more; she prefaces nearly every chapter with a fictional document, some of them only tangentially relevant.
* The ''Literature/MythAdventures'' humorous fantasy novels written by Robert Lynn Asprin. Each chapter has a fictitious quote. An example might be something like, "Violence is never the right thing to do" - Attila the Hun.
** Asprin has commented that he bitterly came to regret doing this, as making up all the quotes proved to be the hardest part of writing the novels. The later books in the series drop the practice.
* Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/NomesTrilogy'' features epigraphs from ''The Book of Nome'' (a CargoCult religious text) in the first two books and ''A Scientific Encyclopedia For The Enquiring Young Nome'' (which misunderstands things almost as much, but in a different way) in the third.
** ''Discworld/AHatFullOfSky'' starts with an excerpt from ''Fairies and How to Avoid Them''. It also contains part of a text on capturing hivers, although that stops when the writer goes crazy and, it's implied, gets more or less vaporized.
* Every chapter in the ''Literature/NurseryCrime'' series begins this way. The first book uses quotes from various local newspapers, while the second book draws exclusively from ''The Bumper Book of Berkshire Records''.
* The ''Literature/PrinceRoger'' series follows in Eddings' footsteps by having the book open with commentary from a biographer who is writing from a much later point after the events in the books. Some of the things the biographer says are quite important, especially the bits that show that [[spoiler:Roger never really shakes the reputation the BigBad planted that he killed his family and drove his mother mad in order to force her to abdicate so that he could take over the Empire]].



* The ''[[Literature/PrinceRoger Empire of Man]]'' series follows in Eddings' footsteps by having the book open with commentary from a biographer who is writing from a much later point after the events in the books. Some of the things the biographer says are quite important, especially the bits that show that [[spoiler: Roger never really shakes the reputation the BigBad planted that he killed his family and drove his mother mad in order to force her to abdicate so that he could take over the Empire]].
* ''Literature/CatsCradle'' has excerpts from the Books of Bokonon to explain Bokononist philosophy.
* Every chapter of books in the ''Franchise/StarWars: Republic Commando'' series is preceded by an excerpt from an in-universe document. One book even had a Mandalorian-to-English dictionary as an appendix.
* The novel-length ''Literature/CiaphasCain'' stories contain "excerpts" from various fictional sources--often Jenit Sulla's [[PurpleProse unreadable]] biography--in-between chapters.

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* Creator/RobertRankin has ''The Suburban Book of the Dead'', the rewritten ''Suburban Book of the Dead'', works by the guru's guru Hugo Rune, and works ''about'' Hugo Rune by Sir John Rimmer. And that's just for starters.
%%*
The ''[[Literature/PrinceRoger Empire of Man]]'' series follows in Eddings' footsteps ''[[Literature/RealmOfTheElderlings Farseer]]'' and ''Tawny Man'' trilogies by having the book open with commentary Creator/RobinHobb.
%%* ''Literature/{{Redwall}}''
* Jack [=McKinney's=] ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'' [[TieInNovel Tie-In Novels]] use quotes
from a biographer who is writing from a much later point after various in-universe sources to comment on the events of each chapter.
* Every chapter
in the books. Some ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' series opens with one or two quotes from InUniverse works, many of which are philosophical or historical in nature. One notable such work is a history of the things events of the biographer says are quite important, especially first trilogy, written after the bits that show that [[spoiler: Roger never really shakes fact by Drusas Achamian, one of the reputation main characters, which makes the BigBad planted that he killed his family and drove his mother mad in order to force her to abdicate so that he could take over the Empire]].
* ''Literature/CatsCradle'' has excerpts from the Books
first trilogy also a mild case of Bokonon to explain Bokononist philosophy.
DirectLineToTheAuthor.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'': Every chapter of books in the ''Franchise/StarWars: Republic Commando'' ''Literature/RepublicCommando'' series is preceded by an excerpt from an in-universe document. One book even had a Mandalorian-to-English dictionary as an appendix.
* ''Literature/TheToughGuideToFantasyland'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones calls these "gnomic utterances". One of her novels, ''Literature/FireAndHemlock'', also uses quotes from the ballads "Literature/TamLin" and "Thomas the Rhymer" in this way.
* The biography of ''Literature/ThursdayNext'', and several other fictional documents.
* ''Literature/TortallUniverse'': The ''Literature/TrickstersDuet'' has quotes of useful bits of advice Aly got at the start of each chapter stuff from books, people she knows, etc. One example is Daine telling her that the Gods can sense lies, but if you don't make them suspicious enough to read your mind, they won't know if you [[LieOfOmission left something out]].
* ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr''. "A Season for Slaughter" heads each chapter with [[InfoDump extensive]] quotes from the "Red Book", a guide to the alien invaders to which the protagonist has contributed heavily.
* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'':
The novel-length ''Literature/CiaphasCain'' stories contain "excerpts" from various fictional sources--often Jenit Sulla's [[PurpleProse unreadable]] biography--in-between chapters.chapters.
* ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'': In-universe books are often quoted before the prologue or after the epilogue of a book. Typically, the quotations are from history books written after the end of the series, or prophecies written long before.
* ''Literature/YoungWizards'':
** The prologue of ''So You Want to Be a Wizard'' quotes extensively from the [[GreatBigBookOfEverything wizard's manual]] in order establish what wizards are and how [[InsistentTerminology wizardry]] works.
** The series in general contains a few quotes from the ''Book of Night with Moon''.



* Every chapter of ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'' starts with an extract from either ''The Book Of True Names'', which speaks about species of dinosaurs and their applications in society, or ''A Primer To Paradise For The Improvement Of Young Minds'', which focuses on FantasyPantheon of Paradise.
* Several of the novels in the ''Literature/ArrivalsFromTheDark'' and ''Trevelyan's Mission'' series make use of fictional texts to provide exposition, which doesn't stop the protagonist from repeating some of those facts later. In particular, ''The Faraway Saikat'' has every chapter end with a passage from one of the four or five fictional books on the [[HumanAliens Kni'lina]] mentioned early on, describing the race's history, politics, culture, and religion (for example, ''Analogies between Buddhism and Yezdan'tabi'' by Pal Bonjipadhal).



[[folder:Music]]
* The booklets of Music/{{Dragonland}}'s album ''The Battle Of The Ivory Plains'', ''Holy War'', and ''Under The Grey Banner'' feature extracts from fictional books of the setting shared by the three albums.[[/folder]]

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* The booklets of Music/{{Dragonland}}'s album ''The Battle Of The Ivory Plains'', ''Holy War'', and ''Under The Grey Banner'' feature extracts from fictional books of the setting shared by the three albums.[[/folder]]

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* The booklets of Music/{{Dragonland}}'s album ''The Battle Of The Ivory Plains'', ''Holy War'', and ''Under The Grey Banner'' feature extracts from fictional books of the setting shared by the three albums.
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* The loading screens of the later ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' games (''[[VideoGame/RomeTotalWar Rome]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II]]'') have these. Plus in ''[[VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar Shogun]]'' there's a philosipher in the throne room, who if clicked on gives you random quotes from ''Literature/TheArtOfWar''.

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* The loading screens of the later ''VideoGame/TotalWar'' games (''[[VideoGame/RomeTotalWar Rome]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II]]'') have these. Plus in ''[[VideoGame/ShogunTotalWar Shogun]]'' there's a philosipher in the throne room, who if clicked on gives you random quotes from ''Literature/TheArtOfWar''.''Literature/{{The Art of War|SunTzu}}''.


* ''A User's Guide to the Apocalypse'', the ''RolePlay/{{ReplayValueUniverse}}'' fan-supplement for ''TabletopGame/ChuubosMarvelousWishGrantingEngine'', has one quote for every chapter and nearly every section heading. Although some are taken from ''Literature/HitherbyDragons'' and various books, the majority are fictional. "Sources" for these fictional quotes include in-character blog posts, a "Gamebreaker's Glossary", various self-help guides in the style of game FAQs, and even an in-universe novel series written by one dryadTornado.

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* ''A User's Guide to the Apocalypse'', the ''RolePlay/{{ReplayValueUniverse}}'' fan-supplement for ''TabletopGame/ChuubosMarvelousWishGrantingEngine'', has one quote for every chapter and nearly every section heading. Although some are taken from ''Literature/HitherbyDragons'' and various books, the majority are fictional. "Sources" for these fictional quotes include in-character blog posts, a "Gamebreaker's Glossary", various self-help guides in the style of game FAQs, [=FAQs=], and even [[StoryWithinAStory an in-universe novel series series]] written by one dryadTornado.

Added DiffLines:

* ''A User's Guide to the Apocalypse'', the ''RolePlay/{{ReplayValueUniverse}}'' fan-supplement for ''TabletopGame/ChuubosMarvelousWishGrantingEngine'', has one quote for every chapter and nearly every section heading. Although some are taken from ''Literature/HitherbyDragons'' and various books, the majority are fictional. "Sources" for these fictional quotes include in-character blog posts, a "Gamebreaker's Glossary", various self-help guides in the style of game FAQs, and even an in-universe novel series written by one dryadTornado.


* In the ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'' fanfic ''[[FanFic/AThingOfVikings]]'', each chapter opens with an {{Epigraph}} sourced from a fictional work from the future of the alternate history, talking about some element of foreshadowing, worldbuilding, or exposition, with the framing for each being as varied as textbooks, to a Norse-flavored Wiki, to military dossiers on the dragon breeds.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'' fanfic ''[[FanFic/AThingOfVikings]]'', ''FanFic/AThingOfVikings'', each chapter opens with an {{Epigraph}} sourced from a fictional work from the future of the alternate history, talking about some element of foreshadowing, worldbuilding, or exposition, with the framing for each being as varied as textbooks, to a Norse-flavored Wiki, to military dossiers on the dragon breeds.

Added DiffLines:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'' fanfic ''[[FanFic/AThingOfVikings]]'', each chapter opens with an {{Epigraph}} sourced from a fictional work from the future of the alternate history, talking about some element of foreshadowing, worldbuilding, or exposition, with the framing for each being as varied as textbooks, to a Norse-flavored Wiki, to military dossiers on the dragon breeds.

Added DiffLines:

* Several of the novels in the ''Literature/ArrivalsFromTheDark'' and ''Trevelyan's Mission'' series make use of fictional texts to provide exposition, which doesn't stop the protagonist from repeating some of those facts later. In particular, ''The Faraway Saikat'' has every chapter end with a passage from one of the four or five fictional books on the [[HumanAliens Kni'lina]] mentioned early on, describing the race's history, politics, culture, and religion (for example, ''Analogies between Buddhism and Yezdan'tabi'' by Pal Bonjipadhal).

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