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** The second half of the trope is subverted in the case of units with the Impetuous trait (usually knights and similar elite units), who can decide to charge the enemy on their own. They invariably do so when least convenient to the player - isn't it just ''swell'' when the linchpin of your defensive line leaves a gaping hole in it in order to charge some dirty peasants halfway across the field? TruthInTelevision, too : that's pretty much how the French lost Crécy.

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** The second half of the trope is subverted in the case of units with the Impetuous trait (usually knights and similar elite units), who can decide to charge the enemy on their own. They invariably do so when least convenient to the player - isn't it just ''swell'' when the linchpin of your defensive line leaves a gaping hole in it in order to charge some dirty peasants halfway across the field? TruthInTelevision, too : too: that's pretty much how the French lost Crécy.


* In the original ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' PC game, initially you have to travel places to check on progress or issue orders, but as Paul's psychic ability increases you can contact outposts from further away, only becoming limitless after a forced plot evolution. Apparently, there's no radio in the Dune 'verse.
** There isn't, actually. Rather, it is established in ''Dune'' that the Fremen prefer to send messages by "distrans", imprinting a message directly into the nervous system of a flying animal (bats are favoured) that is then released and which makes its way to the recipient, à la carrier pigeons, the reason being that this method nearly impossible to eavesdrop on by technological means. Which still doesn't explain Paul can't just use ''that'' instead.

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* In the original ''Franchise/{{Dune}}'' PC game, initially you have to travel places to check on progress or issue orders, but as Paul's psychic ability increases you can contact outposts from further away, only becoming limitless after a forced plot evolution. Apparently, there's no radio in the The Dune 'verse.
** There isn't, actually. Rather, it is established in ''Dune''
universe does have a weird alternative to radio, but that the Fremen prefer to send messages by "distrans", imprinting a message directly into the nervous system of a flying animal (bats are favoured) that is then released and which makes its way to the recipient, à la carrier pigeons, the reason being that this method nearly impossible to eavesdrop on by technological means. Which still doesn't explain Paul can't just use ''that'' instead.isn't used ''either''.


** ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4'' is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Merchants, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.

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** ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4'' IV'' is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Merchants, agents (Merchants, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.


** ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4'' is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Traders, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.

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** ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4'' is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Traders, agents(Merchants, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.


* The EVA units of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' are noted as simplifying command of troops in the field, helping to justify that part of this trope in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'', and, by extension, ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun''[[note]]but not Firestorm, where the Brotherhood has no problems commanding units in the field for those two missions where neither CABAL nor a stolen EVA unit is available[[/note]].

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* The EVA units of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'' are noted as simplifying command of troops in the field, helping to justify that part of this trope in ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn'', and, by extension, ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun''[[note]]but ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianSun.''[[note]]But not Firestorm, where the Brotherhood has no problems commanding units in the field for those two missions where neither CABAL nor a stolen EVA unit is available[[/note]].available.[[/note]]


* Slytherine's strategy game {{Spartan}} designed their mechanics with this specifically in mind. At the start of the battle it's possible to form your troops up and give them general strategy decisions (advance deep behind the enemy and flank) but once the battle is started it becomes impossible to relay orders more complex than retreat and rally.

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* Slytherine's strategy game {{Spartan}} ''Spartan'' designed their mechanics with this specifically in mind. At the start of the battle it's possible to form your troops up and give them general strategy decisions (advance deep behind the enemy and flank) but once the battle is started it becomes impossible to relay orders more complex than retreat and rally.


* In Paradox's games like VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis and VideoGame/CrusaderKings armies and ships anywhere on Earth will receive orders instantly, even if they are surrounded or on the other side of the planet. Everything in the world visible to any friendly unit is immediately visible to the player. In the economic side of the game there are at least penalties to exploiting the resources of distant lands.
** VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4 is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Traders, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.

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* In Paradox's games like VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' and VideoGame/CrusaderKings ''VideoGame/CrusaderKings,'' armies and ships anywhere on Earth will receive orders instantly, even if they are surrounded or on the other side of the planet. Everything in the world visible to any friendly unit is immediately visible to the player. In the economic side of the game there are at least penalties to exploiting the resources of distant lands.
** VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4 ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis 4'' is rather inconsistent in regards to your agents(Traders, Colonists, Generals, Missionaries and Diplomats). Traders take a certain amount of time to reach a trade center depending on distance of the trade node to your capital, and a similar thing occurs with Colonists. Generals can be instantly assigned to and switched between armies no matter how distant they are, and similarly your missionaries will instantly start converting heretic or heathen provinces anywhere in your empire. Diplomats will instantly ''deliver'' messages and alliances but take a certain amount of time to come back based on the distance between the two capitals.


** The second half of the trope is subverted in the case of units with the Impetuous trait (usually knights and similar elite units), who can decide to charge the enemy on their own. They invariably do so when least convenient to the player - isn't it just ''swell'' when the linchpin of your defensive line leaves a gaping hole in it in order to charge some dirty peasants halfway across the field ? TruthInTelevision, too : that's pretty much how the French lost Crécy.

to:

** The second half of the trope is subverted in the case of units with the Impetuous trait (usually knights and similar elite units), who can decide to charge the enemy on their own. They invariably do so when least convenient to the player - isn't it just ''swell'' when the linchpin of your defensive line leaves a gaping hole in it in order to charge some dirty peasants halfway across the field ? field? TruthInTelevision, too : that's pretty much how the French lost Crécy.



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** This is also why Aifread's pirates can keep operating despite the Abbey having total control of the shipping lanes. They have the loyalty of a flock of Sylphjays, birds which act as perfectly reliable message carriers. Compared to how hard it is to otherwise get a message out to a ship at sea, the pirate fleet can coordinate and run rings around any patrols.



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* A narrative rather than gameplay example: ''VideoGame/TalesOfBerseria'', being a HighFantasy, has no telecommunications, and the ability to travel faster than conventional means is effectively nonexistent. Combine this with the near-world-dominating Abbey being quite happy to suppress information, and news travels very slowly. Velvet's team exploits this; for the first third of the game, despite being [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight extremely distinctive]], they're able to travel pretty much unquestioned because they keep ahead of news of the havoc they've been wreaking, FacialCompositeFailure is in effect, or their targets have been so classified the Abbey isn't even willing to tell their own rank and file about a given incident.


* Justified in ''{{Starcraft}}'' for the Zerg and Protoss factions because it is explicitly a psychic link. Also might be justified for the Terran faction - the lower units like marines, firebats etc., who are brainwashed, drugged soldiers in power armor. The higher units like armors, fliers etc. are experienced and ranked. Actually, whenever you select multiple units, one of them (the one with the highest rank) is selected as a "command unit", which communicates with you. And it is in the future with rather few units (max 12 units get commands at the same time) - radio is quite fine for that, especially when you consider that there is hardly any cover and that taking cover with a ton heavy walking behemoth is not all that easy or practical for most cases. And for heroes, it can be presumed they are making their own judgements. The Terrans use Adjutants to control their troops, so it's not infeasible that, in fact, the commander's interface literally looks like an RTS and the AI relays orders. For example, when the commander "selects" a marine and then "selects" an enemy to attack, what actually happens is that the Adjutant translates it into orders communicated through the marine's PowerArmor, via either voice or even by highlighting said enemy on the helmet's HUD. The real question here is who controls the units through the "RTS" overview screen in ''VideoGame/StarcraftII'' when Raynor is a playable unit on the battlefield, because the player is explicitly Raynor himself rather than some NonEntityGeneral. Usually, missions with Raynor as a playable unit involve him personally leading a small unit. He could just be literally ordering his squad around verbally.

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* Justified in ''{{Starcraft}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' for the Zerg and Protoss factions because it is explicitly a psychic link. Also might be justified for the Terran faction - the lower units like marines, firebats etc., who are brainwashed, drugged soldiers in power armor. The higher units like armors, fliers etc. are experienced and ranked. Actually, whenever you select multiple units, one of them (the one with the highest rank) is selected as a "command unit", which communicates with you. And it is in the future with rather few units (max 12 units get commands at the same time) - radio is quite fine for that, especially when you consider that there is hardly any cover and that taking cover with a ton heavy walking behemoth is not all that easy or practical for most cases. And for heroes, it can be presumed they are making their own judgements. The Terrans use Adjutants to control their troops, so it's not infeasible that, in fact, the commander's interface literally looks like an RTS and the AI relays orders. For example, when the commander "selects" a marine and then "selects" an enemy to attack, what actually happens is that the Adjutant translates it into orders communicated through the marine's PowerArmor, via either voice or even by highlighting said enemy on the helmet's HUD. The real question here is who controls the units through the "RTS" overview screen in ''VideoGame/StarcraftII'' when Raynor is a playable unit on the battlefield, because the player is explicitly Raynor himself rather than some NonEntityGeneral. Usually, missions with Raynor as a playable unit involve him personally leading a small unit. He could just be literally ordering his squad around verbally.


* ''VideoGame/WarhammerDarkOmen'' has the variant where you can command units normally, but once engaged in melee the only way to get them out is if one side or the other breaks. You can deliberately order a unit to break, which is generally a very bad idea considering that routing units take large losses and are [[NintendoHard nigh]] [[LostForever irreplaceable.]]

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* ''VideoGame/WarhammerDarkOmen'' has the variant where you can command units normally, but once engaged in melee the only way to get them out is if one side or the other breaks. You can deliberately order a unit to break, which is generally a very bad idea considering that routing units take large losses and are [[NintendoHard nigh]] [[LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent irreplaceable.]]


* Some of the ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games (particularly [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe 7]], [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia 12]], [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening 13]], and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates 14]]) makes the commander an entity to represent the player who can issue someone orders from any distance (which the [[Webcomic/AwkwardZombie page image]] above [[ParodiedTrope makes fun of]]). Most of the other games simply make the player a NonEntityGeneral (though FE 4 has the oddity of units cross country coordinating)

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* Some of the ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games (particularly [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe 7]], [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia 12]], [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening 13]], and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates 14]]) makes make the commander an entity to represent the player who can issue someone orders from any distance (which the [[Webcomic/AwkwardZombie page image]] above [[ParodiedTrope makes fun of]]). Most of the other games simply make the player a NonEntityGeneral (though FE 4 has the oddity of units cross country coordinating)


* In ''Literature/EndersGame'', the Formics were like this due to a HiveMind, and humans compensated by learning how to create instant communication technology. [[spoiler: Ender in fact commented on how the game he was playing was unrealistic because of the instant communication, when unbeknownst to him, it was actually real. Bean realizes the game is real for this very reason in a later book, but never informs others]] It also ''does'' filter through a chain of command, albeit brief, once he started training with his squad leaders. This is ''usually'' not a problem. [[spoiler:Bean first realizes the truth after an instructor asks him about a book Bean supposedly checked out from the Battle School library involving ancient battle tactics of building multiple layers of defense structures. Bean, having used the book as a cover and only skimmed it (he has eidetic memory, though), tries to justify his interest in it, only to realize that it's nigh-impossible to defend a planet without a truly massive fleet (which the Buggers actually have), so the only viable option to humans is attack]].

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* In ''Literature/EndersGame'', the Formics were like this due to a HiveMind, and humans compensated by learning how to create instant communication technology. [[spoiler: Ender [[spoiler:Ender in fact commented on how the game he was playing was unrealistic because of the instant communication, when unbeknownst to him, it was actually real. Bean realizes the game is real for this very reason in a later book, but never informs others]] others.]] It also ''does'' filter through a chain of command, albeit brief, once he started training with his squad leaders. This is ''usually'' not a problem. In ''Literature/EndersShadow'', [[spoiler:Bean first realizes the truth after an instructor asks him about a book Bean supposedly checked out from the Battle School library involving ancient battle tactics of building multiple layers of defense structures. Bean, having used the book as a cover and only skimmed it (he has eidetic memory, though), tries to justify his interest in it, only to realize that it's nigh-impossible to defend a planet without a truly massive fleet (which the Buggers actually have), so the only viable option to humans is attack]].


* Ditto for the [=iOS=] port of ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion'' called ''Starbase Orion''. Unlike the original game, which played this trope straight (and justified it by having {{Subspace Ansible}}s), the port only allows you to give behavioral orders prior to the battle and initial targets. So you ''can'' tell all your ships to kill a specific enemy ship first, but after that they use their behavior settings to determine the next target. If a battle happens to run longer than a certain time limit, you are given the option of amending the orders for the next turn. You also may not redirect your fleets in FTL, although you may hire a leader who is a master at communications, granting you this (buggy) ability.

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* Ditto for the [=iOS=] port of ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion'' called ''Starbase Orion''.''VideoGame/StarbaseOrion''. Unlike the original game, which played this trope straight (and justified it by having {{Subspace Ansible}}s), the port only allows you to give behavioral orders prior to the battle and initial targets. So you ''can'' tell all your ships to kill a specific enemy ship first, but after that they use their behavior settings to determine the next target. If a battle happens to run longer than a certain time limit, you are given the option of amending the orders for the next turn. You also may not redirect your fleets in FTL, although you may hire a leader who is a master at communications, granting you this (buggy) ability.

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