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* The trope's name comes from a pastiche of E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] that appeared in a scene of ''Series/{{Farscape}}: The Peacekeeper Wars'' where Harvey (who was named after NotSoImaginaryFriend of the movie Harvey) writes "E = MC Hammer" on a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srHJBueSx40 blackboard of other nonsense]]. Especially funny in that Crichton, as a physicist and an astronaut, would know exactly what E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] actually means, and Harvey is likely just dicking around.
* The same exact equation was said aloud by Dina on the Nickelodeon sitcom ''Series/SaluteYourShorts'', during a scene intended to make fun of the "growing and learning" activities going on during her camp experience.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Red Cell", Abby and [=McGee=] get into an argument about whether or not a set of equations is homology or cohomology. But the operator symbols are different in these two concepts, and what are subscripts in homology are superscripts in cohomology. No one with sufficient education (as Abby and [=McGee=] have) can mistake one for the other.
* In the ''Series/{{Covert Affairs}}'' episode "Walter's Walk", Auggie refers to a sequence of numbers as being a "complex cylic permutation". But a permutation is a rearrangement of things, not a sequence. Moreover cyclic permutations are the simplest of all permutations, and talking about them being complex makes no sense. Everyone also mixes up [[InsistentTerminology complicated and complex.]] Complex means having multiple parts, complicated means puzzling.
* In an episode of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', a integral equation was used to open the rift that led Jack and Tosh into the past. It didn't seem very realistic, though at least it had integration variables.

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* The trope's name comes A sketch in series 1 episode 3 of ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'' involves a "hilarious blooper" from a pastiche of E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] that appeared 1970s Open University programme, in which Hugh Laurie's presenter talks us through a scene of ''Series/{{Farscape}}: The Peacekeeper Wars'' where Harvey (who was named after NotSoImaginaryFriend of the movie Harvey) writes "E = MC Hammer" on a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srHJBueSx40 blackboard full of other nonsense]]. Especially funny in that Crichton, as a physicist and an astronaut, would know exactly what E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] actually means, and Harvey is likely just dicking around.
* The same exact
nonsensical integral-like equations. What's more, the flub involves the equation was said aloud by Dina on giving a "resultant modular quantity" of 0.567395, rather than 0.567359 as Laurie's character states, when the Nickelodeon sitcom ''Series/SaluteYourShorts'', during integral in question has no limits and wouldn't have a scene intended numerical solution, not to make fun of mention that the "growing and learning" activities going on during her camp experience.
programme appears to be a physics lecture about wave theory, which wouldn't involve numbers that precise as solutions anyway. ... Hmm, come to think of it, that's a hilarious blooper in itself! I don't believe it! Ha ha ha ha!
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Red Cell", Abby and [=McGee=] get into an argument about whether or not a set of equations is homology or cohomology. But the operator symbols are different in these two concepts, and what are subscripts in homology are superscripts in cohomology. No one with sufficient education (as Abby and [=McGee=] have) can mistake one for the other.
* In the ''Series/{{Covert Affairs}}''
''Series/CovertAffairs'' episode "Walter's Walk", Auggie refers to a sequence of numbers as being a "complex cylic permutation". But a permutation is a rearrangement of things, not a sequence. Moreover cyclic permutations are the simplest of all permutations, and talking about them being complex makes no sense. Everyone also mixes up [[InsistentTerminology complicated and complex.]] Complex means having multiple parts, complicated means puzzling.
* In an episode of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', a integral equation was used to open the rift that led Jack and Tosh into the past. It didn't seem very realistic, though at least it had integration variables.
puzzling.



** The episode "The Impossible Planet" has [[http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/maxeq.html#c3 Maxwell's equations of electric and magnetic fields]] as graffiti on a table in the cafeteria.
** In "The Three Doctors," after coming through the black hole, the physicist Dr. Tyler writes the famous equation in the sand. Justified, too--he's trying to come to grips with the fact that he's just traveled at the speed of light.
** One of the forms of Gallifreyan (the Time Lords language) appears to be this, specifically Old High Gallifreyan.

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** The episode "The Impossible Planet" has [[http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/maxeq.html#c3 Maxwell's equations of electric and magnetic fields]] as graffiti on a table in the cafeteria.
** In
[[Recap/DoctorWhoS10E1TheThreeDoctors "The Three Doctors," after Doctors"]]: After coming through the black hole, the physicist Dr. Tyler writes the famous equation in the sand. Justified, too--he's too he's trying to come to grips with the fact that he's just traveled at the speed of light.
** One of the forms of written Gallifreyan (the Time Lords Lords' language) appears to be this, specifically Old High Gallifreyan.Gallifreyan.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet "The Impossible Planet"]] has [[http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/maxeq.html#c3 Maxwell's equations of electric and magnetic fields]] as graffiti on a table in the cafeteria.



*** His first episode ("Deep Breath") takes this UpToEleven. While suffering from a severe bout of amnesia and delirium, he gets a hold of a piece of chalk and covers ''[[RoomFullOfCrazy his entire bedroom]]'' in mathematical equations.
* In the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', the main character leaves his blackboard covered in equations, not knowing what to write after the equals sign. When he comes back, his double has solved it, and the expression he has written has an infinity symbol on the denominator. That's right. He just needed to divide by infinity.
* One of the clips in the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' opener shows a black and white image of a scientist writing complex equations across a blackboard. It looks very fancy until the glaring mathematical error.
** In his original pitch for ''Franchise/StarTrek'', Creator/GeneRoddenberry wanted to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation the Drake equation]] to demonstrate how likely it was we'd encounter aliens. Unfortunately, he couldn't remember the Drake equation, so he just made something up (including two variables being ''raised to the first power''). In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Future's End" Rain Robinson's work station has ''both'' equations on the wall.
** The original series episode "Court-Martial" refers to amplifying the sound of a heartbeat by a factor of "one to the fourth power"... which is ''one'', meaning no amplification (or attenuation) at all.
* In ''Series/{{Lost}}'' Seasons 4 & 5 you get both Daniel Faraday (4) & his mother (5) just constantly writing jibberish on the chalkboard while conducting experiments.
** Terrifyingly, the DVD shows that a real professor of physics wrote that gibberish up for them.
* A sketch in series 1 episode 3 of ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'' involves a "hilarious blooper" from a 1970s Open University programme, in which Hugh Laurie's presenter talks us through a blackboard full of nonsensical integral-like equations. What's more, the flub involves the equation giving a "resultant modular quantity" of 0.567395, rather than 0.567359 as Laurie's character states, when the integral in question has no limits and wouldn't have a numerical solution, not to mention that the programme appears to be a physics lecture about wave theory, which wouldn't involve numbers that precise as solutions anyway. ... Hmm, come to think of it, that's a hilarious blooper in itself! I don't believe it! Ha ha ha ha!

to:

*** His first episode ("Deep Breath") ([[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E1DeepBreath "Deep Breath"]]) takes this UpToEleven. While suffering from a severe bout of amnesia and delirium, he gets a hold of a piece of chalk and covers ''[[RoomFullOfCrazy his entire bedroom]]'' in mathematical equations.
* In the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', the main character leaves his blackboard covered in equations, not knowing what to write after the equals sign. When he comes back, his double has solved it, and the expression he has written has an infinity symbol on the denominator. That's right. He just needed to divide by infinity.
* One of the clips in the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' opener shows a black and white image of a scientist writing complex equations across a blackboard. It looks very fancy until the glaring mathematical error.
** In his original pitch for ''Franchise/StarTrek'', Creator/GeneRoddenberry wanted to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation the Drake equation]] to demonstrate how likely it was we'd encounter aliens. Unfortunately, he couldn't remember the Drake equation, so he just made something up (including two variables being ''raised to the first power''). In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Future's End" Rain Robinson's work station has ''both'' equations on the wall.
** The original series episode "Court-Martial" refers to amplifying the sound of a heartbeat by a factor of "one to the fourth power"... which is ''one'', meaning no amplification (or attenuation) at all.
* In ''Series/{{Lost}}'' Seasons 4 & 5 you get both Daniel Faraday (4) & his mother (5) just constantly writing jibberish on the chalkboard while conducting experiments.
** Terrifyingly, the DVD shows that a real professor of physics wrote that gibberish up for them.
* A sketch in series 1 episode 3 of ''Series/ABitOfFryAndLaurie'' involves a "hilarious blooper" from a 1970s Open University programme, in which Hugh Laurie's presenter talks us through a blackboard full of nonsensical integral-like equations. What's more, the flub involves the equation giving a "resultant modular quantity" of 0.567395, rather than 0.567359 as Laurie's character states, when the integral in question has no limits and wouldn't have a numerical solution, not to mention that the programme appears to be a physics lecture about wave theory, which wouldn't involve numbers that precise as solutions anyway. ... Hmm, come to think of it, that's a hilarious blooper in itself! I don't believe it! Ha ha ha ha!
equations.



* ''Series/NUMB3RS'' gets a lot of credit for having both correct (syntactically) and relevant (in the context of the episode) math equations. Generally, it does -- when the equations are displayed in the foreground. Whenever we see one of the fancy animations while Charlie explains something, though, expect at least half of the math in the background to be random and irrelevant. It gets to the point where even people who know nothing about math should be able to figure out that the equations are meaningless, because they appear even when the explanation Charlie is giving is not mathematical in nature (like the infamous IRC explanation, which doubles as being wholly inaccurate itself).

to:

* ''Series/NUMB3RS'' gets The trope's name comes from a lot pastiche of credit for having both correct (syntactically) and relevant (in the context E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] that appeared in a scene of ''Series/{{Farscape}}: The Peacekeeper Wars'' where Harvey (who was named after NotSoImaginaryFriend of the episode) math equations. Generally, it does -- when movie Harvey) writes "E = MC Hammer" on a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srHJBueSx40 blackboard of other nonsense]]. Especially funny in that Crichton, as a physicist and an astronaut, would know exactly what E=mc[--[[superscript:2]]--] actually means, and Harvey is likely just dicking around.
* In ''Series/{{Lost}}'' Seasons 4 & 5 you get both Daniel Faraday (4) & his mother (5) just constantly writing gibberish on
the equations are displayed in the foreground. Whenever we see one of the fancy animations chalkboard while Charlie explains something, though, expect at least half of conducting experiments.
** Terrifyingly,
the math in the background to be random and irrelevant. It gets to the point where even people who know nothing about math should be able to figure out DVD shows that the equations are meaningless, because they appear even when the explanation Charlie is giving is not mathematical in nature (like the infamous IRC explanation, which doubles as being wholly inaccurate itself).a real professor of physics wrote that gibberish up for them.



-->'''Tory''': You forgot to [[CarryTheOne carry gravity.]]
-->''({{beat}})''
-->'''Grant''': ''What?!''

to:

-->'''Tory''': You forgot to [[CarryTheOne carry gravity.]]
-->''({{beat}})''
-->'''Grant''': ''What?!''
gravity]].\\
''({{beat}})''\\
'''Grant''': ''What?!''
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Red Cell", Abby and [=McGee=] get into an argument about whether or not a set of equations is homology or cohomology. But the operator symbols are different in these two concepts, and what are subscripts in homology are superscripts in cohomology. No one with sufficient education (as Abby and [=McGee=] have) can mistake one for the other.
* ''Series/NUMB3RS'' gets a lot of credit for having both correct (syntactically) and relevant (in the context of the episode) math equations. Generally, it does -- when the equations are displayed in the foreground. Whenever we see one of the fancy animations while Charlie explains something, though, expect at least half of the math in the background to be random and irrelevant. It gets to the point where even people who know nothing about math should be able to figure out that the equations are meaningless, because they appear even when the explanation Charlie is giving is not mathematical in nature (like the infamous IRC explanation, which doubles as being wholly inaccurate itself).



%%* The same exact equation was said aloud by Dina on the Nickelodeon sitcom ''Series/SaluteYourShorts'', during a scene intended to make fun of the "growing and learning" activities going on during her camp experience.
* In the pilot episode of ''Series/{{Sliders}}'', the main character leaves his blackboard covered in equations, not knowing what to write after the equals sign. When he comes back, his double has solved it, and the expression he has written has an infinity symbol on the denominator. That's right. He just needed to divide by infinity.
* One of the clips in the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' opener shows a black and white image of a scientist writing complex equations across a blackboard. It looks very fancy until the glaring mathematical error.
** In his original pitch for ''Franchise/StarTrek'', Creator/GeneRoddenberry wanted to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation the Drake equation]] to demonstrate how likely it was we'd encounter aliens. Unfortunately, he couldn't remember the Drake equation, so he just made something up (including two variables being ''raised to the first power''). In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Future's End" Rain Robinson's work station has ''both'' equations on the wall.
** The original series episode "Court-Martial" refers to amplifying the sound of a heartbeat by a factor of "one to the fourth power"... which is ''one'', meaning no amplification (or attenuation) at all.



* In an episode of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', a integral equation was used to open the rift that led Jack and Tosh into the past. It didn't seem very realistic, though at least it had integration variables.



[[folder:Web Comics]]

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[[folder:Web Comics]][[folder:Webcomics]]

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* In one of the [[ComicBook/BuckGodotZapGunForHire Buck Godot]] comic books, the classic erroneous proof that 2=1 (see "Real Life" section below) is used in a thought bubble to show Buck suddenly solving the case he has been working on throughout the comic.

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Compare/contrast to FormulaForTheUnformulable, when characters try to calculate in incalculable and use visually similar equations.


** In one episode, Bender is terrified when the number 666 mysteriously appears on the wall... in binary.
** [[spoiler:But since it's written backwards, not until he sees it in a mirror.]]

to:

** In one episode, Bender is terrified when the number 666 mysteriously appears on the wall... in binary.
**
binary. [[spoiler:But since it's written backwards, not until he sees it in a mirror.]]



* On ''Animaniacs'', Einstein is inspired when Yakko, Wakko and Dot sing the ACME Song and Wakko writes it backwards, with the "a" resembling a "2", resulting in [=Emc2=]. Al merely added an "=" between the "E" and "m".

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* On ''Animaniacs'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'', Einstein is inspired when Yakko, Wakko and Dot sing the ACME Song and Wakko writes it backwards, with the "a" resembling a "2", resulting in [=Emc2=]. Al merely added an "=" between the "E" and "m".


* Subverted in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome in ''Tobaku Datenroku Zero''. Near the end of a psychotic quiz game in which a super-sharp pendulum is lowered when the answer is wrong, Ukai Zero is answering a trivia question about the period of a pendulum. He's shown to be under pressure, thinking up a bunch of random equations which have nothing to do with the relevant speeds of rotation. And he gets the question wrong. However, [[spoiler:it turns out that all those equations were him using the measurements of his body parts to ascertain that, with his next incorrect answer, the anchor would crash into the block his head was resting on, effectively winning the game. The MC was not happy.]]

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* Subverted in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome in ''Tobaku Datenroku Zero''. Near the end of a psychotic quiz game in which a super-sharp pendulum is lowered when the answer is wrong, Ukai Zero is answering a trivia question about the period of a pendulum. He's shown to be under pressure, thinking up a bunch of random equations which have nothing to do with the relevant speeds of rotation. And he gets the question wrong. However, [[spoiler:it turns out that all those equations were him using the measurements of his body parts to ascertain that, with his next incorrect answer, the anchor would crash into the block his head was resting on, effectively winning the game. The MC was not happy.]]

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* In ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' episode "Guided Mouse-ille" the final act involves Tom making a homemade explosive with equations that end up in "KABOOM!". [[spoiler: After Jerry drops his own bomb into the concoction, it explodes and somehow throw the two into the Stone Age.]]


** Ken Keeler, one of the writers, is a gifted mathematician, and, in "The Prisoner of Benda", the FreakyFridayFlip episode, he successfully created and proved a new mathematical formula that proves how body swaps can switch back. [https://theinfosphere.org/The_Prisoner_of_Benda#The_Futurama_theorem Read more about it here.]

to:

** Ken Keeler, one of the writers, is a gifted mathematician, and, in "The Prisoner of Benda", the FreakyFridayFlip episode, he successfully created and proved a new mathematical formula that proves how body swaps can switch back. [https://theinfosphere.org/The_Prisoner_of_Benda#The_Futurama_theorem org/Futurama_theorem Read more about it here.]

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** Ken Keeler, one of the writers, is a gifted mathematician, and, in "The Prisoner of Benda", the FreakyFridayFlip episode, he successfully created and proved a new mathematical formula that proves how body swaps can switch back. [https://theinfosphere.org/The_Prisoner_of_Benda#The_Futurama_theorem Read more about it here.]


* Parodied in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'', in where a chalkboard at the Kong Kollege reads "9÷3=6", "8×1=9", and "4+2=5" under the title "Exam". [[DontExplainTheJoke The joke, of course, is that the Kremlings that attend the school are dumb]].

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* Parodied in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry2DiddysKongQuest'', in where which a chalkboard at the Kong Kollege reads "9÷3=6", "8×1=9", and "4+2=5" under the title "Exam". [[DontExplainTheJoke The joke, of course, is that the Kremlings that attend the school are dumb]].


* ''Radio/LoZooDi105'': An ''Unreal Radio'' sketch (aired on March the 21st, 2011) had "Professor IncredibleHulk Franchise/{{Batman}} [[UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein Einstein]] [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHulk Bruce Banner]] Jr."[[note]](no, really - that OverlyLongName being spelled exactly like that is a RunningGag[=/=]OverlyLongGag in said sketch)[[/note]] trying to solve the "[[UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan Jordan]]-Chiambretti theorem", which "explains why [[CaptainObvious there are so little short basketball players.]]"

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* ''Radio/LoZooDi105'': An ''Unreal Radio'' sketch (aired on March the 21st, 2011) had "Professor IncredibleHulk ComicBook/IncredibleHulk Franchise/{{Batman}} [[UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein Einstein]] [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHulk [[ComicBook/IncredibleHulk Bruce Banner]] Jr."[[note]](no, really - that OverlyLongName being spelled exactly like that is a RunningGag[=/=]OverlyLongGag in said sketch)[[/note]] trying to solve the "[[UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan Jordan]]-Chiambretti theorem", which "explains why [[CaptainObvious there are so little short basketball players.]]"

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* Played for laughs in the Alcatraz Elementary level of ''VideoGame/NightmareNed'', where one segment involves Ned navigating a giant chalkboard littered with nonsensical equations and diagrams, some of which come to life, and set entirely to a math teacher [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0q-xfXdP8k singing a musical number in the background]].

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* One ''WesternAnimation/PeppaPig'' episode has Peppa and George visit Daddy Pig at work, and his whiteboard features the quadratic equation.

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[[folder:Radio]]
* ''Radio/LoZooDi105'': An ''Unreal Radio'' sketch (aired on March the 21st, 2011) had "Professor IncredibleHulk Franchise/{{Batman}} [[UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein Einstein]] [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHulk Bruce Banner]] Jr."[[note]](no, really - that OverlyLongName being spelled exactly like that is a RunningGag[=/=]OverlyLongGag in said sketch)[[/note]] trying to solve the "[[UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan Jordan]]-Chiambretti theorem", which "explains why [[CaptainObvious there are so little short basketball players.]]"
--> '''Professor Incredible Hulk Batman Einstein Bruce Banner Junior:''' ''"So, the basket is three meters above the ground... [three meters] minus Brunetta[[note]](former minister Renato Brunetta, known for [[TheNapoleon his less-than-average heigth)]][[/note]]... [[TakeThat equals two...]]"''
[[/folder]]


If you were looking for the regular MC Hammer, go [[Music/MCHammer here]].

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See also {{Technobabble}}. If you were looking for the regular MC Hammer, go [[Music/MCHammer here]].


* ''Manga/AssassinationClassroom'' surprisingly subverts this. Whenever the students have to ''fight a monster'' during their exams, they solve it in the correct way, including the language exams in japanese and english. Considering that the exams get insanely difficult during the end, it almost borders on a GeniusBonus to even even ''know'' that all answers are correct.

to:

* ''Manga/AssassinationClassroom'' surprisingly subverts this. Whenever the students have to ''fight a monster'' during their exams, they solve it in the correct way, including the language exams in japanese Japanese and english.English. Considering that the exams get insanely difficult during the end, it almost borders on a GeniusBonus to even even ''know'' that all answers are correct.






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