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** Also introduced in ''How To Train Your Dragon 2'', [[BigBad Drago Bludvist]] is an abusive version of this trope. He enslaves dragons and forces them to submit to his will by screaming at them, hitting them with a bullhook, pinning them to the floor under his boot, [[spoiler:and directly controlling their minds with his own captive Bewilderbeast, an Alpha dragon]]. Drago's approach is deconstructed, however, since his dragons only follow him out of fear, and as soon as [[spoiler:Toothless]] challenges [[spoiler:Drago's Bewilderbeast]] for the right to command the dragons, Drago's entire army abandons him and sides with Hiccup.

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* ''Franchise/TouhouProject'': Amongst Kasen Ibaraki's numerous pets is her baby dragon Koutei, [[ActionPet who she uses for some of her attacks]] in ''VideoGame/UrbanLegendInLimbo''


A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but]] are [[FairyDragons too small]] for the average person to ride]]. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.

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A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but]] are [[FairyDragons too small]] for the average person to ride]].ride. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.


A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.

to:

A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but but]] are [[FairyDragons too small small]] for the average person to ride]]. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.


The Dragon Tamer trope describes people who raise, befriend, command, and/or train dragons for whatever reason, including but not limited to combat or competition, environmental purposes, or even just for fun. The methods used to get said dragons to obey them can include but are not limited to:

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The Dragon Tamer trope describes people who raise, befriend, command, and/or train dragons for whatever reason, including but not limited to combat [[BeastOfBattle combat]] or competition, environmental purposes, or even just for fun. The methods used to get said dragons to obey them can include but are not limited to:

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* The ''Literature/HowToTrainYourDragon'' book series centers around Hiccup's struggles keeping control of his dragon and becoming a respected member of the Hairy Hooligan tribe.


* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'': Apart from the {{Player Character}}s possibly using one or more Dragon-types making them one by default, along with random {{NPCs}} with Dragon-types in their teams:

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'': Apart from the {{Player Character}}s possibly using one or more Dragon-types making them one by default, along with random {{NPCs}} [=NPCs=] with Dragon-types in their teams:


This trope mostly deals with non-dragons that work with dragons, whether they're no different from a regular animal, [[IntellectualAnimal or basically on par with a human.]] While the "tamer" portion of the trope name may imply only "master-servant" or "pet and owner" type relationships can count, it can also include partnerships between equals, though regardless of the nature of the relationship, generally it is the human (Or other non-dragon species) who initiates the partnership.

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This trope mostly deals with non-dragons that work with dragons, whether they're no different from a regular animal, [[IntellectualAnimal or basically on par with a human.]] While the "tamer" portion of the trope name may imply only "master-servant" or "pet and owner" type relationships can count, it can also include partnerships between equals, though regardless of the nature of the relationship, generally it is the human (Or other non-dragon species) who initiates the partnership.
partnership. While Dragon Tamers may happen to ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope.



A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. While Dragon Tamers may happen to ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.

to:

A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. While Dragon Tamers may happen to ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.


A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. While Dragon Tamers may ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.

to:

A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. While Dragon Tamers may happen to ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.


* Mundane training techniques like you would use for any other pet or wild animal, whether through positive or [[BadPeopleAbuseAnimals negative]] reinforcement. (This is most often seen with the more animalistic examples of this trope)

This trope mostly deals with dragons that work with non-dragons, whether they're no different from a regular animal, [[IntellectualAnimal or basically on par with a human.]] While the "tamer" portion of the trope name may imply only "master-servant" or "pet and owner" type relationships can count, it can also include partnerships between equals, though regardless of the nature of the relationship, generally it is the human (Or other non-dragon species) who initiates the partnership.

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* Mundane training techniques like you would use for any other pet or wild animal, whether through positive or [[BadPeopleAbuseAnimals negative]] reinforcement. (This is most often seen with the dragons leaning more animalistic examples of this trope)

towards non-sapience)

This trope mostly deals with dragons non-dragons that work with non-dragons, dragons, whether they're no different from a regular animal, [[IntellectualAnimal or basically on par with a human.]] While the "tamer" portion of the trope name may imply only "master-servant" or "pet and owner" type relationships can count, it can also include partnerships between equals, though regardless of the nature of the relationship, generally it is the human (Or other non-dragon species) who initiates the partnership.



A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.

to:

A subtrope of TheBeastmaster and FluffyTamer, if dragons have a reputation for being dangerous in general or in the wrong hands. Dragon Tamers are most often also {{Dragon Rider}}s, since the dragons will often allow their partner to ride on their back, but this isn't strictly necessary to count as an example, particularly when the dragons are trainable or otherwise willing to work with humans, [[ShoulderSizedDragon but are too small for the average person to ride]]. While Dragon Tamers may ''specialize'' in working with dragons, it isn't strictly necessary for them to ''solely'' work with dragons to count as an example of the trope. Compare and contrast TheDragonslayer, whose main job is to ''slay'' dragons instead of raise or train them, though there's nothing stopping someone from being both.


* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'': Apart from the {{Player Character}}s possibly using one or more Dragon-types making them one by default:

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'': Apart from the {{Player Character}}s possibly using one or more Dragon-types making them one by default:default, along with random {{NPCs}} with Dragon-types in their teams:


* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'': Dragoons, dragon-riding knights including recurring character Futsch, regularly appear in the series.


* Iris in ''Anime/PokemonTheSeriesBlackAndWhite'' strives to become a master Dragon-type trainer. Her SignareMon is the child-like Axew, and most of her troubles with her Pokémon stems from trying to train the rebellious Excadrill, who isn't even a Dragon-type. She later catches a Dragonite, who proves to be her strongest Pokémon and the hardest test of her resolve.

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* Iris in ''Anime/PokemonTheSeriesBlackAndWhite'' strives to become a master Dragon-type trainer. Her SignareMon SignatureMon is the child-like Axew, and most of her troubles with her Pokémon stems from trying to train the rebellious Excadrill, who isn't even a Dragon-type. She later catches a Dragonite, who proves to be her strongest Pokémon and the hardest test of her resolve.

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* ''VideoGame/HowToRaiseADragon'': The dragon gets captured at birth, and is kept as a pet for a master. At this second stage of the game, the dragon is too powerful and breaks out of the cage - with regular escape being considered generally a merciful result for the master. Other options for dealing with the master vary based on the obtained breath effect.


!!Examples :

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!!Examples :
!!Examples:



** Ron's older brother, Charlie, despite his association with dragons, is actually not one of these. He's a biologist who studies dragons in their natural habitats, and he does not try to tame them. The closest he comes to this trope is in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', when he helps handle the dragons used in the first Triwizard Tournament task. Even then, they're still treated as dangerous wild animals and are explicitly ''not'' tamed, making him technically more of a dragon wrangler.

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** Ron's older brother, Charlie, despite his association with dragons, is actually not one of these. He's a biologist who studies dragons in their natural habitats, and he does not try to tame them. The closest he comes to this trope is in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'', ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'' when he helps handle the dragons used in the first Triwizard Tournament task. Even then, they're still treated as dangerous wild animals and are explicitly ''not'' tamed, making him technically more of a dragon wrangler.



* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'': After the draconic Basiliskans were defeated by the Mandalorians following a last ditch effort in which they poisoned their planet to deny them victory, the Mandalorians turned them into war mounts alongside their war droids. Eventually, [[FormerlySapientSpecies they lost their sentience]], and became little more than beasts for the Mandalorians to use in their future wars.

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* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'': After the draconic Basiliskans were defeated by the Mandalorians following a last ditch last-ditch effort in which they poisoned their planet to deny them victory, the Mandalorians turned them into war mounts alongside their war droids. Eventually, [[FormerlySapientSpecies they lost their sentience]], and became little more than beasts for the Mandalorians to use in their future wars.

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