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* ''VideoGame/{{Samidare}}''

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* ''VideoGame/{{Samidare}}''''Samidare''



* ''VideoGame/{{cloudphobia}}''
* ''VideoGame/DiadraEmpty''

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* ''VideoGame/{{cloudphobia}}''
''cloudphobia''
* ''VideoGame/DiadraEmpty''''Diadra Empty''



* ''VideoGame/{{Revolver360}}'' and ''Revolver360 RE:ACTOR''

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* ''VideoGame/{{Revolver360}}'' ''[=Revolver360=]'' and ''Revolver360 ''[=Revolver360=] RE:ACTOR''


** ''VideoGame/AlltynexSecond''

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** ''VideoGame/AlltynexSecond''''VideoGame/AlltynexSecond''[[/index]]



** [[{{FanWorks/Touhou}} Fan Games (various genres)]]

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** [[{{FanWorks/Touhou}} Fan Games (various genres)]]genres)]][[index]]


* ''Banshiryuu''


Added DiffLines:

** ''Shuusou Gyoku''
** ''Kioh Gyoku''
** ''Banshiryuu''


The term "[=doujin soft[ware]=]", also known as "doujin games", refers to a sub-genre of {{doujinshi}} -- essentially, self-published video games. They can be considered Japan's equivalent to an IndieGame; while the term "indie" exists in Japan, it is a relatively new concept which refers only to games released through commercial channels.

Doujin games are generally released for Windows-based computers, and, like doujinshi, doujin soft may offer games based on one or more intellectual properties, or entirely original works. The most frequent genres seen in this category of games are {{platformer}}s, {{fighting game}}s, {{RPG}}s, [[ShootEmUp shoot 'em ups]] (often BulletHell shooters), and {{visual novel}}s. These games are often released at special Japanese conventions, such as the Comic Market (a.k.a. Comiket) and Reitaisai. Depending on the game's subject matter, they can also be considered fan games (e.g., ''VideoGame/GriefSyndrome'' to ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'') or a {{Homage}} to another favorite franchise (e.g. ''VideoGame/{{Rosenkreuzstilette}}'' to ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic''). Most of the time, doujin game developers manage to avoid getting {{screwed by the lawyers}} concerning the use of another franchise, while a few others aren't so lucky. Case in point: ''VideoGame/RockmenR''.

Doujin gaming has been around for a very long time. One of the most prominent (and well-known) long-runners of the doujin scene is the ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' series, with its first entry debuting in 1996; since then, it has expanded across 22 official games in the series and a cornucopia of [[FanWorks/{{Touhou}} fan-games]]. That is not to say there aren't other doujin game series that have contended for such a position and legacy. Other doujin series, such as the ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' series, have even migrated into the realm of mainstream anime and manga.

to:

The term "[=doujin soft[ware]=]", also known as "doujin games", refers to a sub-genre of {{doujinshi}} -- essentially, self-published video games. They can be considered Japan's equivalent to an IndieGame; {{indie game}}; while the term "indie" exists in Japan, it is a relatively new concept which refers only to games released through commercial channels.

Doujin games are generally released for Windows-based computers, and, like doujinshi, doujin soft may offer games based on one or more intellectual properties, or entirely original works. The most frequent genres seen in this category of games are {{platformer}}s, {{fighting game}}s, {{RPG}}s, [[ShootEmUp shoot 'em ups]] (often BulletHell shooters), and {{visual novel}}s. These games are often released at special Japanese conventions, such as the Comic Market (a.k.a. Comiket) and Reitaisai. Depending on the game's subject matter, they can also be considered fan games (e.g., ''VideoGame/GriefSyndrome'' to ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'') or a {{Homage}} {{homage}} to another favorite franchise (e.g. ''VideoGame/{{Rosenkreuzstilette}}'' to ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic''). ''VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}}''). Most of the time, doujin game developers manage to avoid getting {{screwed by the lawyers}} concerning the use of another franchise, while a few others aren't so lucky. Case in point: lucky, such ''VideoGame/RockmenR''.

Doujin gaming video games has been around for a very long time. One of the most prominent (and well-known) long-runners of the doujin scene is the ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' series, with its first entry debuting in 1996; since then, it has expanded across 22 official games in the series and a cornucopia of [[FanWorks/{{Touhou}} fan-games]]. That is not to say there aren't other doujin game series that have contended for such a position and legacy. Other doujin series, such as the ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' series, have even migrated into the realm of mainstream anime and manga.



In recent years, there have also been a very small but growing number of publishers, independent or otherwise, that localize these games outside of Japan and bring them overseas. There are also a few specialty online retailers that can import the original pressings of a doujin game, if copies are available in stock and if shipping the game in question isn't taxing on your wallet. Additionally, some doujin games have been re-released and localized digitally through digital distribution services such as [=DLsite=], Playism, and UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} to make things easier for those who could not attend to the events where they were released in and alleviate the cost of importing the games overseas.

to:

In recent years, there have also been a very small but growing number of publishers, independent or otherwise, that localize these games outside of Japan and bring them overseas. There are also a few specialty online retailers that can import the original pressings of a doujin game, if copies are available in stock and if shipping the game in question isn't taxing on your wallet. Additionally, some doujin games have been re-released and localized digitally through digital distribution services such as [=DLsite=], Playism, and UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} to make things easier for those who could not attend to the events where they were originally released in and alleviate the cost of importing the games overseas.
overseas. Some games even get some [[UpdatedRerelease quality-of-life improvements]] or even [[RegionalBonus special bonuses]] one way or another for their overseas release, depending on the publisher.



[[folder:Action Adventure]]
[[AC:Metroidvania]]
* ''VideoGame/BunnyMustDie'' (from the creator of the ''Gundemonium'' series)
* Creator/FoxEye
** ''VideoGame/{{Holdover}}'' (a ''Metroid''-inspired, timing-based PlatformGame with an emphasis on maintaining an OxygenMeter)
** ''VideoGame/SacrificeGirl'' (an UnderTheSea Metroidvania with SurvivalHorror elements)
** ''[[VideoGame/BlueGuardianMargaret BLUE GUARDIAN: Margaret]]'' (a highly {{Ecchi}} Metroidvania PlatformGame with more ''Metroid''-inspired gameplay compared to the above two.)
* ''Ghost 9''
** ''Ghost 92''
* ''HACK 9''
** ''HACKER 9''
** ''HACK 9 Solid''
[[/folder]]



* ''A Witch and Fabricated Shadows''



* ''Soul Saber 2''



[[folder:Action-Adventure]]
* ''The Legend of Derella'' (A ''The Legend of Zelda''-styled game featuring characters from ''Idol Master'')

[[AC:Metroidvania]]
* ''VideoGame/BunnyMustDie'' (from the creator of the ''Gundemonium'' series)
* Creator/FoxEye
** ''VideoGame/{{Holdover}}'' (a ''Metroid''-inspired, timing-based PlatformGame with an emphasis on maintaining an OxygenMeter)
** ''VideoGame/SacrificeGirl'' (an UnderTheSea Metroidvania with SurvivalHorror elements)
** ''[[VideoGame/BlueGuardianMargaret BLUE GUARDIAN: Margaret]]'' (a highly {{Ecchi}} Metroidvania PlatformGame with more ''Metroid''-inspired gameplay compared to the above two.)
* ''Ghost 9''
** ''Ghost 92''
* ''HACK 9''
** ''HACKER 9''
** ''HACK 9 Solid''
[[/folder]]



* ''Cinderella Escape!! 2 Revenge''



** ''Acceleration of SUGURI 2''

to:

** ''Acceleration ''acceleration of SUGURI 2''



** ''Eternal Fighter Zero''
** ''Eternal Fighter Zero -RENEWAL-''
** ''Eternal Fighter Zero: Blue Sky Edition''
** ''Eternal Fighter Zero: Bad Moon Edition''
** ''Eternal Fighter Zero -Memorial-''
** ''Eternal Fighter Zero -Revival-''



* ''Furry Friends Fight!'' (a fighting fan-game of ''Kemono Friends'')



* ''Soul Saber''



* ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' (The spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'', ''Urban Legend in Limbo'' and ''Antimony of Common Flowersa''.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' (The (the spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'', ''Urban Legend in Limbo'' and ''Antimony of Common Flowersa''.Flowersa'')



* ''VideoGame/KoumajouDensetsu'' (a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' homage using ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' characters)

to:

* ''VideoGame/KoumajouDensetsu'' (a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' homage using ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' ''Touhou'' characters)



[[folder:Puzzle]]
* ''Cinderella Escape!''
[[/folder]]



** ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JADE PENETRATE-'' and ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JAD PENETRATE- BLACK PACKAGE''
* ''Flying Red Barrel ~A Diary of Little Aviator~'' (from the circle behind the ''SUGURI'' series)

to:

** ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JADE PENETRATE-'' and ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JAD ''[=eXceed3rd=]-JADE PENETRATE- BLACK PACKAGE''
* Vertical shooters by Creator/OrangeJuice:
**
''Flying Red Barrel ~A Diary of Little Aviator~'' (from the circle behind the ''SUGURI'' series)Aviator~''
** ''VideoGame/QPShooting'' series



* ''The Hurricane of the Varstray: Collateral Hazard'' (from the doujin circle behind ''Trouble Witches'')

to:

* ''The Hurricane of the Varstray: Collateral Hazard'' Varstray -Collateral Hazard-'' (from the doujin circle behind ''Trouble Witches'')



* Games by Creator/OrangeJuice:
** ''VideoGame/QPShooting'' series



* ''Wolflame''



* ''Armed Seven''



* ''VideoGame/{{SUGURI}}''

to:

* Horizontal shooters by Orange_Juice:
**
''VideoGame/{{SUGURI}}''



* ''Supercharged Robot VULKAISER''




to:

* ''Zangeki Warp''



* ''VideoGame/EtherVapor'' and ''ETHER VAPOR Remaster'' (a shoot 'em up with changing gameplay, going from a vertical shooter, horizontal shooter, and even a rail shooter)
** ''VideoGame/{{Astebreed}}'', a spiritual successor to ''Ether Vapor''

to:

* ''VideoGame/EtherVapor'' and ''ETHER VAPOR Remaster'' (a shoot 'em up with changing gameplay, going from a vertical shooter, horizontal shooter, and even a rail shooter)
** ''VideoGame/{{Astebreed}}'', a spiritual ''VideoGame/{{Astebreed}}'' (spiritual successor to ''Ether Vapor''Vapor'')



* ''[[Videogame/OneHundredPercentOrangeJuice 100% Orange Juice]]'', a crossover game by Orange_Juice featuring characters from some of their games (''SUGURI'', ''Flying Red Barrel'', and ''QP Shooting'')

to:

* ''[[Videogame/OneHundredPercentOrangeJuice 100% Orange Juice]]'', ''Videogame/OneHundredPercentOrangeJuice'', a crossover game by Orange_Juice featuring characters from some of their games (''SUGURI'', ''Flying Red Barrel'', and ''QP Shooting'')


** ''QP Shooting'' series

to:

** ''QP Shooting'' ''VideoGame/QPShooting'' series


* ''QP Shooting'' series

to:

* ** ''QP Shooting'' series


* ''QP Shooting'' and ''QP Shooting Dangerous'' (also from the creators of ''SUGURI'')

to:

* Games by Creator/OrangeJuice:
* ''QP Shooting'' and ''QP Shooting Dangerous'' (also from the creators of ''SUGURI'')series


* ''VideoGame/TerrordromeTheGameRiseOfTheBoogeymen'' (A fighting game [[Franchise/EvilDead starring]] [[Franchise/FridayThe13th various]] [[Franchise/{{Scream}} horror]] [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet movie]] [[Franchise/{{Halloween}} characters]])

to:

* ''VideoGame/TerrordromeTheGameRiseOfTheBoogeymen'' (A fighting game [[Franchise/EvilDead starring]] [[Franchise/FridayThe13th various]] [[Franchise/{{Scream}} [[Film/{{Scream}} horror]] [[Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet movie]] [[Franchise/{{Halloween}} characters]])


Doujin games are generally released for Windows-based computers, and, like doujinshi, doujin soft may offer games based on one or more intellectual properties, or entirely original works. The most frequent genres seen in this category of games are {{platformer}}s, {{fighting game}}s, {{RPG}}s, [[ShootEmUp shoot 'em ups]] (often BulletHell shooters), and {{visual novel}}s. These games are often released at special Japanese conventions, such as the Comic Market (a.k.a. Comiket) and Reitaisai. Depending on the game's subject matter, they can also be considered fan games (e.g., ''VideoGame/GriefSyndrome'' to ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'') or a {{Homage}} to another favorite franchise (e.g. ''VideoGame/{{Rosenkreuzstilette}}'' to ''VideoGame/MegaMan''). Most of the time, doujin game developers manage to avoid getting {{screwed by the lawyers}} concerning the use of another franchise, while a few others aren't so lucky. Case in point: ''VideoGame/RockmenR''.

to:

Doujin games are generally released for Windows-based computers, and, like doujinshi, doujin soft may offer games based on one or more intellectual properties, or entirely original works. The most frequent genres seen in this category of games are {{platformer}}s, {{fighting game}}s, {{RPG}}s, [[ShootEmUp shoot 'em ups]] (often BulletHell shooters), and {{visual novel}}s. These games are often released at special Japanese conventions, such as the Comic Market (a.k.a. Comiket) and Reitaisai. Depending on the game's subject matter, they can also be considered fan games (e.g., ''VideoGame/GriefSyndrome'' to ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'') or a {{Homage}} to another favorite franchise (e.g. ''VideoGame/{{Rosenkreuzstilette}}'' to ''VideoGame/MegaMan'').''VideoGame/MegaManClassic''). Most of the time, doujin game developers manage to avoid getting {{screwed by the lawyers}} concerning the use of another franchise, while a few others aren't so lucky. Case in point: ''VideoGame/RockmenR''.


** (a sequel to and crossover between both of the above games)

to:

** (a ''VideoGame/MagicalBattleArenaNEXT''(a sequel to and crossover between both of the above games)


** ''VideoGame/MagicalBattleArenaNEXT'' (a sequel to and crossover between both of the above games)

to:

** ''VideoGame/MagicalBattleArenaNEXT'' ** (a sequel to and crossover between both of the above games)


In recent years, there have also been a very small but growing number of publishers, independent or otherwise, that localize these games outside of Japan and bring them overseas. There are also a few specialty online retailers that can import the original pressings of a doujin game, if copies are available in stock and if shipping the game in question isn't taxing on your wallet. Additionally, some doujin games have been re-released and localized digitally through digital distribution services such [=DLsite=], Playism, and UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} to make things easier for those who could not attend to the events where they were released in and alleviate the cost of importing the games overseas.

to:

In recent years, there have also been a very small but growing number of publishers, independent or otherwise, that localize these games outside of Japan and bring them overseas. There are also a few specialty online retailers that can import the original pressings of a doujin game, if copies are available in stock and if shipping the game in question isn't taxing on your wallet. Additionally, some doujin games have been re-released and localized digitally through digital distribution services such as [=DLsite=], Playism, and UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} to make things easier for those who could not attend to the events where they were released in and alleviate the cost of importing the games overseas.


Doujin gaming has been around for a very long time. One of the most prominent (and well-known) long-runners of the doujin scene is the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' series, with its first entry debuting in 1996; since then, it has expanded across 22 official games in the series and a cornucopia of [[FanWorks/{{Touhou}} fan-games]]. That is not to say there aren't other doujin game series that have contended for such a position and legacy. Other doujin series, such as the ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' series, have even migrated into the realm of mainstream anime and manga.

to:

Doujin gaming has been around for a very long time. One of the most prominent (and well-known) long-runners of the doujin scene is the ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' series, with its first entry debuting in 1996; since then, it has expanded across 22 official games in the series and a cornucopia of [[FanWorks/{{Touhou}} fan-games]]. That is not to say there aren't other doujin game series that have contended for such a position and legacy. Other doujin series, such as the ''VisualNovel/HigurashiWhenTheyCry'' series, have even migrated into the realm of mainstream anime and manga.



* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' (The spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'', ''Urban Legend in Limbo'' and ''Antimony of Common Flowersa''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' (The spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'', ''Urban Legend in Limbo'' and ''Antimony of Common Flowersa''.



* ''VideoGame/KoumajouDensetsu'' (a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' homage using ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' characters)

to:

* ''VideoGame/KoumajouDensetsu'' (a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' homage using ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' ''Franchise/{{Touhou}}'' characters)



* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}''

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}''''Franchise/{{Touhou}}''

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/KoumajouDensetsu'' (a ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' homage using ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' characters)


* ''VideoGame/AzumangaFighter''



* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' (The spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'' and ''Urban Legend in Limbo''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' (The spin-off [[FightingGame fighting games]] ''Immaterial And Missing Power'', ''Scarlet Weather Rhapsody'', ''Hisoutensoku'', ''Hopeless Masquerade'' and Masquerade'', ''Urban Legend in Limbo''.Limbo'' and ''Antimony of Common Flowersa''.

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