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* The final level of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'' is probably the easiest one in the whole game. You're in a medium-sized room with Idunn, the TrueFinalBoss, on the other side, and there are only two other enemies to start with, neither of whom actually block your path. Idunn's stats are also fairly underwhelming, and don't increase on Hard Mode (bar one extra point of HP). On top of that, at this point you should have most of the Legendary Weapons, plus the Binding Blade, all of which are PurposefullyOverpowered and also effective against dragon enemies (which both Idunn and her cronies are). With a Dancer or Bard, it's feasible to finish the map in ''one turn.''

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* The final level of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'' is probably the easiest one in the whole game. You're in a medium-sized room with Idunn, the TrueFinalBoss, on the other side, and there are only two other enemies to start with, neither of whom actually block your path. Idunn's stats are also fairly underwhelming, and don't increase on Hard Mode (bar one extra point of HP). On top of that, at this point you should have most of the Legendary Weapons, plus the Binding Blade, all of which are PurposefullyOverpowered and also effective against dragon enemies (which both Idunn and her cronies are). With a Dancer or Bard, it's feasible to finish the map in ''one turn.'''' The level prior to it wasn't much better, being little more than walking through an overlong labyrinth and fighting identical squads of Manaketes.

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Contrast TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon, where the final level is awesome and memorable.


** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'' has three different ending missions. Ending C, [[spoiler:which is the only one that lets you keep all of the playable characters and kill all of the remaining antagonists]] starts with a gunfight at a foundry which, while intense, isn't really on a bigger scale then some of the other fights in the game. Next, you have to kill four different targets, all of whom only have a small group of mooks to kill, and only one of whom can be killed in a particularly interesting way. It feels like a step down given the scope of the game and how spectacular Rockstar Games' final missions tend to be. And the final missions for the other two endings are even worse, as they just involve a simple little car chase against a single enemy who barely fights back, one of which ends which ends with a single bullet being fired, the other with a [[MortonsFork red herring moral choice]].

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** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'' has three different ending missions. Ending C, [[spoiler:which is the only one that lets you keep all of the playable characters and kill all of the remaining antagonists]] starts with a gunfight at a foundry which, while intense, isn't really on a bigger scale then some of the other fights in the game. Next, you have to kill four different targets, all of whom only have a small group of mooks to kill, and only one of whom can be killed in a particularly interesting way. It feels like a step down given the scope of the game and how spectacular Rockstar Games' final missions tend to be. And the final missions for the other two endings are even worse, as they just involve a simple little car chase against a single enemy who barely fights back, one of which ends which ends with a single bullet being fired, the other with a [[MortonsFork red herring moral choice]].

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* The final level of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'' is probably the easiest one in the whole game. You're in a medium-sized room with Idunn, the TrueFinalBoss, on the other side, and there are only two other enemies to start with, neither of whom actually block your path. Idunn's stats are also fairly underwhelming, and don't increase on Hard Mode (bar one extra point of HP). On top of that, at this point you should have most of the Legendary Weapons, plus the Binding Blade, all of which are PurposefullyOverpowered and also effective against dragon enemies (which both Idunn and her cronies are). With a Dancer or Bard, it's feasible to finish the map in ''one turn.''


** The [[VideoGame/GodOfWar1 first game]]'s ending loses steam with the spike pillars of Hades, that require you to climb two pillars of spinning spikes with one hit sending you right back down to the bottom (and each of these takes about a minute to climb if you're going fast). The entire Hades section has several jumping puzzles, dull scenery and very little of the action or puzzles from the best sections of the game. The developers themselves have said this section was thrown together in a hurry with little time to properly test it. For many, the pseudo-escort mission in the middle of the final boss falls under this too.

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** The [[VideoGame/GodOfWar1 [[VideoGame/GodOfWarI first game]]'s ending loses steam with the spike pillars of Hades, that require you to climb two pillars of spinning spikes with one hit sending you right back down to the bottom (and each of these takes about a minute to climb if you're going fast). The entire Hades section has several jumping puzzles, dull scenery and very little of the action or puzzles from the best sections of the game. The developers themselves have said this section was thrown together in a hurry with little time to properly test it. For many, the pseudo-escort mission in the middle of the final boss falls under this too.


* ''VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries'':
** The [[VideoGame/GodOfWar first game]]'s ending loses steam with the spike pillars of Hades, that require you to climb two pillars of spinning spikes with one hit sending you right back down to the bottom (and each of these takes about a minute to climb if you're going fast). The entire Hades section has several jumping puzzles, dull scenery and very little of the action or puzzles from the best sections of the game. The developers themselves have said this section was thrown together in a hurry with little time to properly test it. For many, the pseudo-escort mission in the middle of the final boss falls under this too.

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* ''VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries'':
''VideoGame/GodOfWar'':
** The [[VideoGame/GodOfWar [[VideoGame/GodOfWar1 first game]]'s ending loses steam with the spike pillars of Hades, that require you to climb two pillars of spinning spikes with one hit sending you right back down to the bottom (and each of these takes about a minute to climb if you're going fast). The entire Hades section has several jumping puzzles, dull scenery and very little of the action or puzzles from the best sections of the game. The developers themselves have said this section was thrown together in a hurry with little time to properly test it. For many, the pseudo-escort mission in the middle of the final boss falls under this too.


->''"I realise it's the endgame, but it still feels like too much. Just because it's 'endgame' doesn't mean it should turn into Russian roulette."''

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->''"I realise it's the endgame, but it still feels like too much. Just because it's 'endgame' doesn't mean it should [[ThatOneLevel turn into Russian roulette.into]] {{Russian roulette}}."''



** End of the World in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' takes this to new extremes. The level is a horribly broken mess where you have to play as every single character in the game...''except'' for Sonic himself (the ''main character!'') and Blaze, who are considered the only two bearable characters in the game to play as. As if that weren't enough, the level is a full-blown MarathonLevel separated into seven different sections...which the game has to spend time ''[[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading each and every one.]]'' As if that weren't enough, the level's main gimmick are time holes that [[OneHitPointWonder instantly kill you even if you have rings]], which pop up out of nowhere and can often lead to a cheap death. AND you only get five lives to do this incredibly long level, even if you collected a bunch throughout the game. [[LetsPlay/SonicTheHedgehog2006 pokecapn's LP]] of the game has five videos of about 30 minutes each for what should have been 12 minutes of gameplay, largely due to just how broken and unplayable this sequence is.

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** End of the World in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2006'' takes this to new extremes. The level is a horribly broken mess where you have to play as every single character in the game...''except'' for Sonic himself (the ''main character!'') and Blaze, who are considered the only two bearable characters in the game to play as. As if that weren't enough, the level is a full-blown MarathonLevel separated into seven different sections...which the game has to spend time ''[[LoadsAndLoadsOfLoading loading each and every one.]]'' As if that weren't enough, the level's main gimmick are time holes that [[OneHitPointWonder suck you in and [[OneHitKill instantly kill you even if you have rings]], [[ClassicVideoGameScrewYous which pop up out of nowhere nowhere]] and [[FakeDifficulty can often lead to a cheap death. AND death]].[[note]]There are actually ''two'' types of time hole purple and orange (the main colors of Mephiles and Iblis, respectively). [[DemonicSpiders The purple ones]] are the ones that suck you in and instantly kill you; the orange ones throw boxes at you, which is [[GoddamnedBats annoying but manageable]]. However, time holes continuously spawn as you progress, and if too many appear at once (and you haven't been sucked into a purple hole or a BottomlessPit next to a purple hole by then), you immediately die even if you're far, far away from every single InstantDeathRadius.[[/note]] ''And'' you only get five lives to do this incredibly long level, even if you collected a bunch throughout the game. [[LetsPlay/SonicTheHedgehog2006 pokecapn's LP]] of the game has five videos of about 30 minutes each (and copious amounts of SanitySlippage) for what should have been 12 minutes of gameplay, largely due to just how broken and unplayable this sequence is.



** ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4 Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode I]]'' ends with a throwback to [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2 Metropolis Zone]], a BossRush, and a rehash of ''Sonic 2'''s final boss.
** ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' received flak for this. The final boss is definitely a bit of a mess compared to the other bosses in the game and awkward to play. The final level, Planet Wisp, also has some awkward level design. This is particularly so in Act 1, where you must use the Spike wisp from ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' only it doesn't control as well as it did in that game. It is also a MarathonLevel. Some reviewers go even further back than that, citing the difficulty spike that happens at the start of the Modern era (last 1/3 of the game).
** ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles'' was a good game all in all, but most critics and fans found the mid and late game boring. Apparently, this is due to Creator/BioWare rushing production halfway through when they were forced to divert more attention to the ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' production crew. Up until the DiscOneFinalBoss, you're still likely to ''learn how the game works'' due to the excessive uses of ActionCommands, yet the game chucks tons of high defense or high-evasion enemies at you. While you certainly do have a CrutchCharacter with you, he doesn't help much. This changes once you reach the Twilight Cage - where it's obvious that [=BioWare=] ''really'' put a bit of heart and soul into the game. The difficulty is reduced significantly if you recruit [[TheMedic Cream]] into the party. Unfortunately, [[GuideDangIt it is very easy to permanently miss her during the early game]].
** ''VideoGame/SonicMania'''s final level is Titanic Monarch, which is also the last "original" Zone. While not a bad stage, it's generally seen as the weakest of the new Zones because it doesn't have as much SceneryPorn, relies heavily on gravity orbs, and is [[MarathonLevel very long]]. The game's final bosses (the Act II boss of Titanic Monarch and the TrueFinalBoss in Egg Reverie Zone) also get some criticism for being fairly simple.

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** ''[[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog4 Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode I]]'' ends with a throwback to [[VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2 Metropolis Zone]], a BossRush, and a rehash of ''Sonic 2'''s 2''[='=]s final boss.
** ''VideoGame/SonicGenerations'' received flak for this. The final boss is definitely a bit of a mess compared to the other bosses in the game and awkward to play. The final level, Planet Wisp, also has some awkward level design. This is particularly so in Act 1, where you must use the Spike wisp Wisp from ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' ''VideoGame/SonicColors'', only it doesn't control as well as it did in that game. It is also a MarathonLevel. Some reviewers go even further back than that, citing the difficulty spike that happens at the start of the Modern era (last 1/3 of the game).
** ''VideoGame/SonicChronicles'' was a good game all in all, but most critics and fans found the mid mid- and late game late-game boring. Apparently, this is due to Creator/BioWare rushing production halfway through when they were forced to divert more attention to the ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins'' production crew. Up until the DiscOneFinalBoss, you're still likely to ''learn how the game works'' due to the excessive uses of ActionCommands, yet the game chucks tons of high defense or high-evasion enemies at you. While you certainly do have a CrutchCharacter with you, he doesn't help much. This changes once you reach the Twilight Cage - where it's obvious that [=BioWare=] ''really'' put a bit of heart and soul into the game. The difficulty is reduced significantly if you recruit [[TheMedic Cream]] into the party. Unfortunately, [[GuideDangIt it is very easy to permanently miss her during the early game]].
** ''VideoGame/SonicMania'''s ''VideoGame/SonicMania''[='=]s final level is Titanic Monarch, which is also the last "original" Zone. While not a bad stage, it's generally seen as the weakest of the new Zones because it doesn't have as much SceneryPorn, relies heavily on gravity orbs, and is [[MarathonLevel very long]]. The game's final bosses (the Act II boss of Titanic Monarch and the TrueFinalBoss in Egg Reverie Zone) also get some criticism for being fairly simple.



** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. Bowser is not even that hard, either.

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** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies enemies, and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of [[AdvancingBossOfDoom a chase sequence sequence]] [[LevelInBossClothing that expands the level's length, length]], there's no excuse. Bowser is not even that hard, either.



* While many the later levels in ''[[VideoGame/JetSetRadio Jet Set Radio Future]]'' may be cool-looking, [[ScrappyLevel they sure can be frustrating]] due to a combination of bottomless pits, confusing design, and the map layout doesn't help things, either.
* ''VideoGame/Croc2'' has two quite detailed worlds being the Home world and the Ice world. It then has Caveman world which has a drop in quality, followed by the abysmal Inca world, which has only two levels, one of which revolves entirely around collecting 30 gobbos from a huge, dull pyramid. Possible reasons for this might be that the company was running out of budget at the time, but it ended up delivering far little than it promised.
* ''VideoGame/Rayman3HoodlumHavoc'': The last level is far from terrible, but it does feature a certain amount of recycled elements (partly made up for with the flying sections). Additionally, it's never explained [[spoiler: how Globox escaped from the Hoodlum HQ and found the flying vehicle]]. The best example of this, however, is the final part of the final boss, which quickly starts feeling long and dull (not made any better by the mediocre music and awful background).
* ''VideoGame/RaymanLegends'' is truly spectacular up until Living Dead Party. The world has one new level - Grannies World Tour, which is really cool and awesome, but much easier and shorter than the other [[MusicalGameplay music levels]]. Afterwards, the rest of the world is just 8-bit rehashes of the previous music levels, except with [[InterfaceScrew horrific visual distortions]] that do nothing but add on FakeDifficulty, and [[CheckpointStarvation no checkpoints]]. And at the end of the world is "Grannies World Tour, 8-Bit Edition", which is yet another 8-bit rehash... with ''all'' of the distortions combined!

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* While many the later levels in ''[[VideoGame/JetSetRadio Jet Set Radio Future]]'' may be cool-looking, [[ScrappyLevel they sure can be frustrating]] due to a combination of bottomless pits, pits and confusing design, and design (and the map layout doesn't help things, either.
either).
* ''VideoGame/Croc2'' has two quite detailed worlds being the Home world and the Ice world. It then has Caveman world world, which has a drop in quality, followed by the abysmal Inca world, which has only two levels, one of which revolves entirely around collecting 30 gobbos from a huge, dull pyramid. Possible reasons for this might be that the company was running out of budget at the time, but it ended up delivering far little less than it promised.
* ''VideoGame/Rayman3HoodlumHavoc'': The last level is far from terrible, but it does feature a certain amount of recycled elements (partly made up for with the flying sections). Additionally, it's never explained [[spoiler: how [[spoiler:how Globox escaped from the Hoodlum HQ and found the flying vehicle]]. The best example of this, however, is the final part of the final boss, FinalBoss, which quickly starts feeling long and dull (not made any better by the mediocre music and awful background).
* ''VideoGame/RaymanLegends'' is truly spectacular up until Living Dead Party. The world has one new level - Grannies World Tour, which is really cool and awesome, but much easier and shorter than the other [[MusicalGameplay music levels]]. Afterwards, the rest of the world is just 8-bit rehashes of the previous music levels, except with [[InterfaceScrew horrific visual distortions]] that do nothing but add on FakeDifficulty, and [[CheckpointStarvation no checkpoints]]. And at the end of the world is "Grannies World Tour, 8-Bit Edition", which is yet another 8-bit rehash... with ''all'' of the distortions combined!


The game's quality suddenly dips to hell and beyond, so much so that it feels as though the game was outsourced to another, less-competent group of developers for the endgame. The difficulty becomes largely inconsistent and unable to make up its mind about whether to [[DifficultySpike spike]] or [[BreatherLevel drop]]. The pacing is [[EndingFatigue slow-paced and boring, filled with blatant padding in a generally fast-paced game world]]. The gameplay is suddenly full of [[UnexpectedGameplayChange awkward]] {{stealth|BasedMission}}, TrialAndErrorGameplay, and terribly-placed ([[CheckpointStarvation if at all]]) {{checkpoint}}s. The end boss? [[AntiClimaxBoss Dies with about as much effort as it took to beat the first level's]] WarmUpBoss. This climax should be as good as what lay beforehand and then some, yet it leaves you with a bad taste in your mouth after an otherwise enjoyable game. Essentially AWinnerIsYou from a game design standpoint.

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The game's quality suddenly dips to hell and beyond, so much so that it feels as though the game was outsourced to another, less-competent group of developers for the endgame. The difficulty becomes largely inconsistent and unable to make up its mind about whether to [[DifficultySpike spike]] or [[BreatherLevel drop]]. The pacing is [[EndingFatigue slow-paced and boring, filled with blatant padding {{padding}} in a generally fast-paced game world]]. The gameplay is suddenly full of [[UnexpectedGameplayChange awkward]] {{stealth|BasedMission}}, TrialAndErrorGameplay, and terribly-placed ([[CheckpointStarvation if at all]]) {{checkpoint}}s. The [[FinalBoss end boss? boss]]? [[AntiClimaxBoss Dies with about as much effort as it took to beat the first level's]] WarmUpBoss. This climax should be as good as what lay beforehand and then some, yet it leaves you with a bad taste in your mouth after an otherwise enjoyable game. Essentially AWinnerIsYou from a game design standpoint.



If you really want people throwing their discs into a fire, then it can be combined with an AWinnerIsYou or NoEnding as a "reward" for the player's perseverance. In a lot of cases (namely story-focused games) this can lead to a CosmicDeadline situation. The opposite of SlowPacedBeginning, but there's nothing stopping a game suffering from both.

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If you really want people throwing their discs into a fire, then it can be combined with an AWinnerIsYou or NoEnding as a "reward" for the player's perseverance. In a lot of cases (namely story-focused games) games), this can lead to a CosmicDeadline situation. The opposite of SlowPacedBeginning, but there's nothing stopping a game suffering from both.


Many developers have admitted to paying far less attention to their climaxes than they probably should, as most players don't get that far. Even some professional reviewers admit they don't play enough of the game and many reviews are based off of the early-mid parts of the game. This initiates an obvious vicious cycle of players who would otherwise finish being put off by terrible ending levels, with the expectation that no really great gameplay surprises (with positive impact) will happen after the first half or so of a game is completed. Even if individual developers don't want to be a part of this problem, ExecutiveMeddling will often enforce this trope, especially if the game is ChristmasRushed and the ending is the first thing that's sacrificed. AuthorExistenceFailure is another possibility, if the ending wasn't sorted out ahead of time.

A lot of the time, this also stems from a desire to make the ending very dramatic and different from the rest of the game, in order to make the emotional impact stronger. When it works, it's not an example of this trope, but it fails hard when it doesn't. In the worst situations, you'll get a combination of the above where the game designers put far less effort than they should into the later parts while the writers and artists put in a great deal of work into the same areas, and the designers are obliged to have the player go through long, uneventful levels so such work doesn't go to waste, resulting in EndingFatigue as the player is forced to make their way through levels that were completed in some aspects but not others.

to:

Many developers have admitted to paying far less attention to their climaxes than they probably should, as most players don't get that far. Even some professional reviewers admit they don't play enough of the game and many reviews are based off of the early-mid parts of the game. This initiates an obvious vicious cycle of players who would otherwise finish being put off by terrible ending levels, with the expectation that no really great gameplay surprises (with positive impact) will happen after the first half or so of a game is completed. Even if individual developers don't want to be a part of this problem, ExecutiveMeddling will often enforce this trope, especially if the game is ChristmasRushed and the ending is the first thing that's sacrificed. AuthorExistenceFailure is another possibility, if the ending wasn't sorted out ahead of time.

time. This was even more prevalent in the days of shareware: when the first third of your game was going to advertise the rest, suddenly you were incentivized to put all the good levels in that part.

A lot of the time, this also stems from a desire to make the ending very dramatic and different from the rest of the game, in order to make the emotional impact stronger. When it works, it's not an example of this trope, but it fails hard when it doesn't. In the worst situations, you'll get a combination of the above where the game designers put far less effort than they should into the later parts while the writers and artists put in a great deal of work into the same areas, and the designers are obliged to have the player go through long, uneventful levels so such work doesn't go to waste, resulting in EndingFatigue as the player is forced to make their way through levels that were completed in some aspects but not others.
others.


*** With that being said, when played on modern clone engines that provide means to reduce execution difficulty and allow the player to focus solely on the puzzle, Mayhem 21 is generally regarded as one of the original game's best levels.


** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. The final boss is not even that hard, either.

to:

** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. The final boss Bowser is not even that hard, either.

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*** With that being said, when played on modern clone engines that provide means to reduce execution difficulty and allow the player to focus solely on the puzzle, Mayhem 21 is generally regarded as one of the original game's best levels.


** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. He's not even that hard, either.

to:

** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. He's The final boss is not even that hard, either.


** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. Doesn't help that every single time you retry the final boss, not only do you have to beat his first phase again, but you have to walk up a long staircase. He's not even that hard, either.

to:

** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. Doesn't help that every single time you retry the final boss, not only do you have to beat his first phase again, but you have to walk up a long staircase. He's not even that hard, either.


** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. Doesn't help that every single time you retry the final boss, not only do you have to beat his first phase again, but you have to walk up a long staircase. He's not even that hard, either.

to:

** "The Final Battle" in VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosU is basically a straight hallway with easy platforming, pathetically avoidable enemies and power-up blocks placed generously enough that the main obstacle, Bowser Jr. in his protected Junior Clown Car, comes across as a small inconvenience at worst, even when going for the Star Coins. And since the final battle with the giant-sized Bowser is a more traditional fight - three-hit formula and all - instead of a chase sequence that expands the level's length, there's no excuse. Doesn't help that every single time you retry the final boss, not only do you have to beat his first phase again, but you have to walk up a long staircase. He's not even that hard, either.

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