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*** Said dwarf also dislikes newspapers, despite the fact that the printing engine is a dwarfish invention.


* ''Film/{{Borat}}'' is full of (fake) Crazy Cultural Comparisons. When interviewing some politician, he claims that it is customary in Kazakhstan to bring a gift a cheese, which he shares with the guy. Then he adds the cheese was made with his wife's milk. [[{{Squick}} Ugh.]]

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* ''Film/{{Borat}}'' is full of (fake) Crazy Cultural Comparisons. When interviewing some politician, he claims that it is customary in Kazakhstan to bring a gift a of cheese, which he shares with the guy. Then he adds the cheese was made with his wife's milk. [[{{Squick}} Ugh.]]

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* Smiling at random strangers as done by Western people, especially Americans, feels weird to Eastern Europeans who tend to keep serious neutral expressions. A smile from a stranger, especially in urban environments, is typically taken to mean that this person wants to scam you or otherwise waste your time, knows you from somewhere even if you're sure you've never met them, or is just plain stupid to find a reason to smile in this grim everyday life. This trend is slowly dying down over the recent decades.


* In American culture, eye contact is considered an essential politeness. In many other cultures it is considered very rude. Many traditional Native Americans have a very hard time with this, and call it "the staring". This is often the basis of misunderstandings.

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* In American culture, eye contact is considered an essential politeness. In many other cultures cultures, it is considered very rude. Many traditional Native Americans have a very hard time with this, and call it "the staring". This is often the basis of misunderstandings.


** In fact this is a constant problem for all sides. In particular Japan follows modern diplomatic protocol and thus things like proportional response are taken as signs of weakness or incompetence. When Japan blows up a senate building in the imperial capitol, for example, the Empire's leadership doesn't understand why it would be done while the building was empty.

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** In fact this is a constant problem for all sides. In particular Japan follows modern diplomatic protocol and thus things like proportional response are taken as signs of weakness or incompetence. When Japan blows up a senate building in the imperial Imperial capitol, for example, the Empire's leadership doesn't understand why it would be done while the building was empty.

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** Skunks usually warn would-be predators away by performing a complex dance, involving standing on their front paws and stomping the ground. As in the above example, dogs may interpret this display as a sign of playfulness, encouraging them to approach rather than warding them away. This might explain why Fido so often comes home smelling of skunk musk.

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* In ''Literature/TheDarkProfitSaga'', Dwarves are a OneGenderRace. No one knows how they reproduce, and attempts to find out usually result in beatings. The Dwarves themselves find the concept of romance uncomfortable, probably because they have no cultural reference point. As such, they tend to treat attempts by others to discuss their romantic feelings for someone else the way another person might react to a [[TooMuchInformation graphic depiction of a sex act]].

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* In Japan, it's traditionally believed that one can gauge a person's soul by looking into their eyes. This proved to be a problem after the war, when the American naval officers, in particular General [=MacArthur=], kept wearing sunglasses. This tended to unnerve the Japanese. Naturally, this has changed over the last half a century.


** A less hilarious example concerning differences in proper first contact protocol on warships triggered a genocidal war in the backstory: when the Minbari ships approached, they did so with their gunports open, intended as a gesture of honesty (albeit one that their leader realized was incredibly stupid just half a moment too late). The humans -- or rather their trigger-happy idiot captain -- mistook it for an act of aggression, and tragedy ensued. And by tragedy, we mean that the Minbari then and there decided to pursue a genocidal war against the humans in revenge for their aforementioned leader, and were very close to achieving their goal when, for reasons impossible to describe here, they just said, "Oh, forget it. Let's actually try and be friends!"

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** A less hilarious example concerning differences in proper first contact protocol on warships triggered a genocidal war in the backstory: when the Minbari ships approached, they did so with their gunports open, intended as a gesture of honesty (albeit one that their leader realized was incredibly stupid just half a moment too late). The humans -- or rather their trigger-happy idiot captain -- mistook it for an act of aggression, aggression (also, the extremely powerful Minbari sensors overloaded the flimsy human sensors and jammed the hyperdrive, making it impossible to tell if the weapons were charging), and tragedy ensued. And by tragedy, we mean that the Minbari then and there decided to pursue a genocidal war against the humans in revenge for their aforementioned leader, and were very close to achieving their goal when, for reasons impossible to describe here, they just said, "Oh, forget it. Let's actually try and be friends!"

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*** She also picks up on his unusual scent, which is why she's later shown asking her scanner about his species and disbelieving the result.


** Played seriously in ''Literature/{{Dune}}''. When Stilgar the Fremen meets with Duke Leto, he spits on the table. As the Duke's men are about to attack Stilgar and probably all be killed, Duncan Idaho tells them to "Hold!" He then thanks Stilgar for the gift of his moisture, spits on the table himself, and explains that doing so was a Fremen gesture of respect (since water is so scarce on Arrakis).

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** Played seriously in ''Literature/{{Dune}}''. When Stilgar the Fremen meets with Duke Leto, he spits on the table. As the Duke's men are about to attack Stilgar and probably all be killed, Duncan Idaho tells them to "Hold!" He then thanks Stilgar for the gift of his moisture, spits on the table himself, and explains that doing so was a Fremen gesture of respect (since water is so scarce on Arrakis). In the film version, it's the Duke himself, who recognizes the gesture for what it is. In the miniseries, it's Paul.


* In ''TabletopGame/TeenagersFromOuterSpace'', most player characters will be aliens with whatever strange customs their players can come up with (since there are no "standard" races), so it's fine to play this trope to the hilt. Hilariously, humans get a shot at it too; because humans come from Earth, which is the coolest, most interesting and happening place in the universe, any native human must probably know just how to act, talk and behave in order to be cool, interesting and happening, and you should listen to them if you want to fit in. Thus, if a human tells you to wear plaid braces, greet your teacher by farting, and always carry a trout, then clearly they must know best. (At least until you find out you've been had.) Another popular one is to tell the cute space babe that humans greet each other by kissing... which can have unexpected consequences.

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* In ''TabletopGame/TeenagersFromOuterSpace'', most player characters will be aliens with whatever strange customs their players can come up with (since there are no "standard" races), so it's fine to play this trope to the hilt. Hilariously, humans get a shot at it too; too in the form of the "Fake Out" ability; because humans come from Earth, which is the coolest, most interesting and happening place in the universe, any native human must probably know just how to act, talk and behave in order to be cool, interesting and happening, and you should listen to them if you want to fit in. Thus, if a human tells you an alien to wear plaid braces, golf pants, greet your the teacher by farting, and always carry a trout, then clearly they must know best. (At least until you find the alien finds out you've they've been had.) Another popular one is to tell the cute space babe that humans greet each other by kissing... which can have unexpected consequences.


* The standard greeting when meeting people in the FurryFandom is hugging, and handshakes are seen as overly formal (and possibly a sign you dislike the person). This is done by anyone regardless of sexuality. In regular society, however, hugging can be seen as overly friendly - and possibly sexual - unless you know the person well (such as family or long-time friends).

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* The standard greeting when meeting people in the FurryFandom UsefulNotes/FurryFandom is hugging, and handshakes are seen as overly formal (and possibly a sign you dislike the person). This is done by anyone regardless of sexuality. In regular society, however, hugging can be seen as overly friendly - and possibly sexual - unless you know the person well (such as family or long-time friends).

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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* In ''TabletopGame/TeenagersFromOuterSpace'', most player characters will be aliens with whatever strange customs their players can come up with (since there are no "standard" races), so it's fine to play this trope to the hilt. Hilariously, humans get a shot at it too; because humans come from Earth, which is the coolest, most interesting and happening place in the universe, any native human must probably know just how to act, talk and behave in order to be cool, interesting and happening, and you should listen to them if you want to fit in. Thus, if a human tells you to wear plaid braces, greet your teacher by farting, and always carry a trout, then clearly they must know best. (At least until you find out you've been had.) Another popular one is to tell the cute space babe that humans greet each other by kissing... which can have unexpected consequences.
[[/folder]]


* At the opening and closing ceremonies of the UsefulNotes/{{London}} 2012 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames, many of the European and South American athletes happily stuck two fingers up at the cameras as they celebrated. [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch Apparently no-one warned them exactly what this means in the UK]].
** When used with the palm ''toward'' the person doing it, it's the V-for-Victory sign from UsefulNotes/WorldWarII (and photos exist of prominent Britons such as UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill using it this way). When used with the palm ''away'' from the person doing it, it has a similar meaning to the US gesture made with one less finger. They're kind of similar, except the palm-inward variant implied "I don't mean ''you'', I mean the bloody Boche".
*** The palm-inward gesture is supposedly much older than Churchill's V-sign, though oddly enough they both had their origins in warfare: the original gesture is said to have been invented by English archers in the Hundred Years War, to show the enemy the fingers that would soon be drawing a longbow and sending some nasty, pointy arrows hurtling in their general direction. [[note]]This story is a perfect example of the long and colourful history of violence between the English and the French, but unfortunately is 100% untrue.[[/note]]
*** When the palm is 'towards' the person doing it, it's rude, and the palm away version is the Victory sign.

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* At the opening and closing ceremonies of the UsefulNotes/{{London}} 2012 UsefulNotes/OlympicGames, many of the European and South American athletes happily stuck two fingers up at the cameras with the back of the hand outward as they celebrated. [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch Apparently no-one warned them exactly what this means in the UK]].
** When used with the palm ''toward'' the person doing it, it's the V-for-Victory sign from UsefulNotes/WorldWarII (and photos exist of prominent Britons such as UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill using it this way). When used with the palm ''away'' from the person doing it, it has a similar meaning to the US gesture made with one less finger. They're kind of similar, except the palm-inward variant implied "I don't mean ''you'', I mean the bloody Boche".
*** The palm-inward gesture is supposedly much older than Churchill's V-sign, though oddly enough they both had their origins in warfare: the original gesture is said to have been invented by English archers in the Hundred Years War, to show the enemy the fingers that would soon be drawing a longbow and sending some nasty, pointy arrows hurtling in their general direction. [[note]]This story is a perfect example of the long and colourful history of violence between the English and the French, but unfortunately is 100% untrue.[[/note]]
*** When the palm is 'towards' the person doing it, it's rude, and the palm away version is the Victory sign.
UK]].

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