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* The ''Teen Titans'' fic ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/12393517/1/Prey-Mate Prey Mate]]'' has dialogue in "Daemos", a language spoken by demons.



* ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' gave us [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantean_language the Atlantean Language.]]
* Planet Turo's Tantalog language from ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' would also count as this, as practically every writing not on Earth is composed of it.

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* ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' ''WesternAnimation/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' gave us [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantean_language the Atlantean Language.]]
* Planet Turo's Tantalog language from ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' ''WesternAnimation/LiloAndStitch'' would also count as this, as practically every writing not on Earth is composed of it.


* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' represents R2-D2's droid beeping with a series of onomatopoeic beep-like words. These began innocuously enough, but slowly got more complicated until it was eventually revealed in-story (after [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1180.html 1180 strips]]!) that the beeps are a comprehensible language, which Chewbacca has at least partially decoded. It was only at this point that the ''readers'' of the comic became aware that R2's beeps were not just random sounds, thus launching a fan decoding effort using the corpus of previously published strips. This spawned a [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/draakslair/viewtopic.php?t=8454 long discussion thread on the forums]], where readers worked together and realised the language was much richer than anyone had suspected.

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* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' represents R2-D2's droid beeping with a series of onomatopoeic beep-like words. These Outside the RPG campaign where the story happens, these are produced by his player with a mobile app. The beeps began innocuously enough, but slowly got more complicated until it was eventually revealed in-story (after [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1180.html 1180 strips]]!) that the beeps are a comprehensible language, which Chewbacca has at least partially decoded. It was only at this point that the ''readers'' of the comic became aware that R2's beeps were not just random sounds, thus launching a fan decoding effort using the corpus of previously published strips. This spawned a [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/draakslair/viewtopic.php?t=8454 long discussion thread on the forums]], where readers worked together and realised the language was much richer than anyone had suspected.


* In ''Literature/HarryPotter'' fanfiction ''Fanfic/TheParselmouthOfGryffindor'', due to the story's focus on it, Parseltongue, while still usually [[TranslationConvention rendered as italicized English]], is sometimes shown "as it is" and [[http://parsel.wikia.com/wiki/Parseltongue rudiments of vocabulary and grammar]] are beginning to surface.


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* In ''Literature/HarryPotter'' fanfiction ''Fanfic/TheParselmouthOfGryffindor'', due to the story's focus on it, Parseltongue, while still usually [[TranslationConvention rendered as italicized English]], is sometimes shown "as it is" and [[http://parsel.wikia.com/wiki/Parseltongue rudiments of vocabulary and grammar]] are beginning to surface.


* The ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' series features a universal language used by all of the species, though the Octolings also have their own separate dialect. Unlike the other Creator/{{Nintendo}} series listed, it cannot be reliably translated; WordOfGod says that it's almost completely random, with both the spoken and written parts of language occasionally taking cues from both Japanese and English. In addition, there are also the occasional instances of actual English appearing in the game, such as the [=MakoMart=] stage in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'' having a cereal box with the word "choco" on it amongst its shelves.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' series features a universal language used by all of the species, though the Octolings also have their own separate dialect. Unlike the other Creator/{{Nintendo}} series listed, it cannot be reliably translated; WordOfGod says that it's almost completely random, with both the spoken and written parts of language occasionally taking cues from both Japanese and English. In addition, there are also the occasional instances of actual English appearing in the game, such as the [=MakoMart=] stage in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'' having a cereal box with the word "choco" on it amongst its shelves.


* ''Webcomic/TheInterstellarTeaHouse'' has Sierk D, one of the languages of the Sierk species, which falls into the "completely original" category. The author will sometimes, in lieu of a comic for the day, provide a [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien-esque]] discussion of Sierk syntax and grammar, or ask the readers to offer phrases for translation. (It's Sierk D because there is also a Sierk A, B, and C, and possibly an E and so forth; Sierk D happens to be the language local to the setting of the story).



* ''Webcomic/TheInterstellarTeaHouse'' has Sierk D, one of the languages of the Sierk species, which falls into the "completely original" category. The author will sometimes, in lieu of a comic for the day, provide a [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien-esque]] discussion of Sierk syntax and grammar, or ask the readers to offer phrases for translation. (It's Sierk D because there is also a Sierk A, B, and C, and possibly an E and so forth; Sierk D happens to be the language local to the setting of the story).


* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' gives us the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarfs_(Discworld)#Language Kad'k]].



* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' gives us the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarfs_(Discworld)#Language Kad'k]].

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%% The examples have been alphabetised; please remember to follow the alphabetical order when adding new examples.


* ''VideoGame/FarCryPrimal'' is set in Stone Age Central Europe, and the dialogue is in Wenja (and its close relatives Izila and Udam), which is based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-European_language Proto-Indo-European]]. Deluxe editions of the game come with a Wenja phrase book, and extensive details about the language can be found on [[http://speakingprimal.com/far-cry-primal/ the personal site]] of historical linguist Andrew Miles Byrd, one of Wenja's creators.



* ''VideoGame/HeavensVault'', a game about archaeology and translating ancient language, has Ancient, the ancient language of the Nebula. There's basic syntactic similiarites to English [[note]]The developers said that at one point they tried something less similar to English, but the testers got confused[[/note]], however there's multiple subtle difference grammar-wise [[note]]Like having no articles, no gendered terms, no verb case, very few tenses, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scriptio_continua scriptio continua writing]][[/note]], and the writing system is completely different, being hieroglyphic and relying on forming compound words from basic glyphs. The game puts most emphasis on written Ancient than spoken, however, since very little of the latter remains, mainly in form of some Elboreth slangs.
* Written material found within ''VideoGame/HelloNeighbor'' seems to be a mix of word exaggeration, syllable-shifting, and letter substitution/omission. For example, a sign that should say "Welcome to Raven Brooks" is written as "Calwom oot Wayron Croobs", while missing posters say "Simming".
* ''VideoGame/JustCause3'' takes this in an interesting direction by making the language spoken in Medici the existing auxiliary language Interlingua. Interlingua looks and sounds enough like a Romance language to the untrained ear that most people can buy it being the native language of a small Mediterranean island nation.



* ''VideoGame/KingsQuest2015'' features Achaka, a knight hopeful from a foreign land hoping to win the knighthood that Graham is after. Since he's from a foreign land, no one understands his native language. Manny, another knight in the running, attempts to translate, but runs into problems. Later on, an entire puzzle is based on learning a few phrases from him; "stalama" meaning no, "affa nata" meaning yes, and "shrekee" meaning dragon. While the player never sees his language in written form, it can be assumed its written as it is spoken.



* The ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'' sub-series has a Foreign Conversion conlang in the form of Coralian, which is English with a new, distinct alphabet.
* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' will continue the post-millennial tradition of Foreign Conversion conlangs, featuring a new distinct alphabet for Star Fleet Oracle.
* The ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarCinematicUniverse'' sub-series continues the use of Foreign Conversion conlangs:

to:

* The ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'' sub-series has a Foreign Conversion conlang in the form of Coralian, which is English with a new, distinct alphabet.
*
alphabet. Its sequel ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' will continue the post-millennial tradition of Foreign Conversion conlangs, featuring a new distinct alphabet for Star Fleet Oracle.
* The ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarCinematicUniverse'' ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarUniverse'' sub-series continues the use of Foreign Conversion conlangs:



* ''VideoGame/TeamICOSeries'' of games all feature a conlang spoken by the main characters of their games, which is clearly based on Japanese but unintelligible to a Japanese speaker. The language is subtitled for the player. ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'' has a second conlang spoken by Yorda, which is subtitled in WingDinglish to emphasize the fact that she and Ico don't speak the same language.
* In ''VideoGame/TelepathTactics'', the [[LizardFolk lissit]] have their own language, which is featured in some scenes in the campaign. In particular, Silithis Predat ("Patient Hunter") enjoys [[GratuitousForeignLanguage inserting Lissit words into her speech]]. A limited Lissit-to-English dictionary is provided in the manual, allowing players to [[http://sinisterdesign.net/forum/index.php?topic=1632.0 translate]] most of the instances in the campaign.



* In ''VideoGame/TelepathTactics'', the [[LizardFolk lissit]] have their own language, which is featured in some scenes in the campaign. In particular, Silithis Predat ("Patient Hunter") enjoys [[GratuitousForeignLanguage inserting Lissit words into her speech]]. A limited Lissit-to-English dictionary is provided in the manual, allowing players to [[http://sinisterdesign.net/forum/index.php?topic=1632.0 translate]] most of the instances in the campaign.
* ''VideoGame/KingsQuest2015'' features Achaka, a knight hopeful from a foreign land hoping to win the knighthood that Graham is after. Since he's from a foreign land, no one understands his native language. Manny, another knight in the running, attempts to translate, but runs into problems. Later on, an entire puzzle is based on learning a few phrases from him; "stalama" meaning no, "affa nata" meaning yes, and "shrekee" meaning dragon. While the player never sees his language in written form, it can be assumed its written as it is spoken.
* ''VideoGame/FarCryPrimal'' is set in Stone Age Central Europe, and the dialogue is in Wenja (and its close relatives Izila and Udam), which is based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-European_language Proto-Indo-European]]. Deluxe editions of the game come with a Wenja phrase book, and extensive details about the language can be found on [[http://speakingprimal.com/far-cry-primal/ the personal site]] of historical linguist Andrew Miles Byrd, one of Wenja's creators.
* VideoGame/TeamICOSeries of games all feature a conlang spoken by the main characters of their games, which is clearly based on Japanese but unintelligible to a Japanese speaker. The language is subtitled for the player. ''VideoGame/{{ICO}}'' has a second conlang spoken by Yorda, which is subtitled in WingDinglish to emphasize the fact that she and Ico don't speak the same language.
* Written material found within ''VideoGame/HelloNeighbor'' seems to be a mix of word exaggeration, syllable-shifting, and letter substitution/omission. For example, a sign that should say "Welcome to Raven Brooks" is written as "Calwom oot Wayron Croobs", while missing posters say "Simming".
* ''VideoGame/HeavensVault'', a game about archaeology and translating ancient language, has Ancient, the ancient language of the Nebula. There's basic syntactic similiarites to English [[note]]The developers said that at one point they tried something less similar to English, but the testers got confused[[/note]], however there's multiple subtle difference grammar-wise [[note]]Like having no articles, no gendered terms, no verb case, very few tenses, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scriptio_continua scriptio continua writing]][[/note]], and the writing system is completely different, being hieroglyphic and relying on forming compound words from basic glyphs. The game puts most emphasis on written Ancient than spoken, however, since very little of the latter remains, mainly in form of some Elboreth slangs.
* ''VideoGame/JustCause3'' takes this in an interesting direction by making the language spoken in Medici the existing auxiliary language Interlingua. Interlingua looks and sounds enough like a Romance language to the untrained ear that most people can buy it being the native language of a small Mediterranean island nation.


* ''{{VideoGame/Outcast}}'' has the Talan language, with the growing dictionary provided to the player. Talans will use some words from it when talking to the hero, and there's also a whole song in it, written in the hero's honor.

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* ''{{VideoGame/Outcast}}'' The ''[[VideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]'' series has Hymmnos, a language vaguely based on English, Japanese, Sanskrit and German. In the Talan setting of the games, it is an obsolete language, used to interface with [[MagicFromTechnology ancient technology in the growing dictionary provided form of songs]]. Unusually, Hymmnos is a language constructed specifically to express the singer's emotions (with special grammar rules that aid them). Though Hymmnos and one of its dialects (New Testament of Pastalie) are the ones that gets the most attention, the series also has the Carmena Foreluna and Ar Ciela languages, predecessors to Hymmnos. A detailed insight into all three of these can be found [[http://conlang.wikia.com/wiki/Hymmnos here]].\\
Its prequel, the ''[[VideoGame/CielNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' series, follows suit with two conlangs: Emotional Song Pact, with glyphs based on the Korean Hangui, and REON-4213, which is practically a programming language.
* ''Franchise/DeadSpace'' has [[ChurchOfHappyology Unitology]]'s cypher language, which is often found [[CouldntFindAPen scrawled on the walls in blood]]. It is an Argot language consisting of [[CypherLanguage the ten numbers and 26 letters of the English Alphabet]], [[http://images.wikia.com/deadspace/images/3/3b/Unitology_Symbol.png as well as a few additional symbols.]] It can be translated to reveal several [[http://images.wikia.com/deadspace/images/8/89/Wall-decode3.jpg hidden messages,]] including a few [[EasterEgg easter eggs]]. This even includes the seemingly random symbols that pop up during hallucinations.
* The demon language of Ozkavosh created for the remake of ''VideoGame/DefenseOfTheAncients'' is almost entirely symbolic, full of synonyms and essentially requires context to be understood. It also does not conjugate, and due
to the player. Talans will use some words from it when talking to demons' [[ItsAllAboutMe nature]], the hero, word for "self" (Ozh) [[LanguageEqualsThought is both capitalized and there's also a whole song emphasized in it, written speech, or in the hero's honor. case of another object of emphasis, emphasized more]].



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' features Al Bhed, which is made up of a simple cypher of English/Japanese (depending on which localization of the game you play obviously) but is spoken in the game by the Al Bhed as a real language. As an added feature, the player can pick up 'primers' throughout their visit to Spira and slowly translate the language, letter by letter. This is part of a small NewGamePlus bonus: The next time a player decides to play through the game, if they had collected most/all of the primers before, they can load up their completed 'dictionary' and understand what various characters/signs are saying right from the beginning!
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has "Dragonspeak", a language telepathically "spoken" by dragons, with its own grammatical rules and sentence structure. The voice acting for dragon characters is always in this language, with translations in the text provided by either the [[PlayerCharacter Warrior of Light's]] Echo, or by the dragon in question choosing to have their words understood by the mortals they are speaking to (which is how the Warrior's NPC friends are able to understand them in ''Heavensward''). Outside of dialogue, most dragon words are left untranslated. There exists three separate topics on [[AllThereInTheManual the official forums]] that detail [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/215647-An-Introduction-to-Dragonspeak how the language was created]], [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/265400-A-Lesson-in-Dragonspeak how the language works]], and [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/265527-Dragonspeak-Dictionary a dictionary of commonly-used words]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'': [[http://linguists.riedl.org/old/ D'ni is a completely original version.]]
* The ''[[VideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]'' series has Hymmnos, a language vaguely based on English, Japanese, Sanskrit and German. In the setting of the games, it is an obsolete language, used to interface with [[MagicFromTechnology ancient technology in the form of songs]]. Unusually, Hymmnos is a language constructed specifically to express the singer's emotions (with special grammar rules that aid them). Though Hymmnos and one of its dialects (New Testament of Pastalie) are the ones that gets the most attention, the series also has the Carmena Foreluna and Ar Ciela languages, predecessors to Hymmnos. A detailed insight into all three of these can be found [[http://conlang.wikia.com/wiki/Hymmnos here]].
** And its prequel, the ''[[VideoGame/CielNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' series, follows suit with two conlangs: Emotional Song Pact, with glyphs based on the Korean Hangui, and REON-4213, which is practically a programming language.
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a whole host of these, with Common (humans), Orcish (orcs), Darnassian (night elves), Gutterspeak (undead), Dwarven (dwarves), Gnomish (gnomes), Zandali (trolls), Draenei (draenei), and Thalassian (blood elves) barely scratching the surface. An interesting note with the Undead: During the beta for ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' (a.k.a. "Vanilla"), the Undead (being formerly living humans) could speak Common, acting as a Translator between the rival factions. However the player-base's tendency to be... juvenile led directly to the creation of Gutterspeak, and is the primary reason you can never learn additional languages, despite some characters knowing 1-2 languages (Faction and Racial).
** In a note of ingenuity and perhaps an example of metagaming, Players have over-time, made simple translations for some of the more commonly spoken enemy chatter as perhaps a way to quickly denote if the enemy player is going to be combative or not. (For example, an Alliance player who says "lol", would be heard by a Horde player as "Bur", and going in the other direction, it would read "Kek", to an Alliance player who encounters a laughing member of the Horde).
** While most people who encounter these languages might cross them off as just made up chatter, there even exists a degree of similar word structure between the Night and Blood Elf languages, given their in-game distant shared ancestry (Darnassian and Thalassian respectively), which shows that the Blizzard creative team probably [[ShownTheirWork Showed Their Work]] in conlanging. Since in-game {{NPC}}s often speak these constructed languages from time to time (battle cries & so forth), any player will inevitably come across some words multiple times, but a complete translation of these languages is unavailable, and only a select number of phrases and words have been [[WordOfGod given official translations by Blizzard]].
** More information can be found here: [[http://www.wowwiki.com/Language World of Warcraft Languages]]
** It should be noted that since these languages appear when the game "translates" player communication into an unintelligible from for those whose character doesn't know said language, a translation back into English is impossible for anything remotely complicated said. The "translation" is intentionally lossy, with many different English letter combinations resulting in the same "translated" words (e.g. both "you" and "lol" are rendered in Orcish as "bur"). This is done on purpose, to prevent players from being able to understand what their opponents are saying even if they have translation software on their side. (This not only prevents the Alliance from getting wind of what the Horde is up to and vice-versa, it also prevents rival teams from hurling insults or death threats at one another; the hot-tempered environment of a Battleground would make this a real danger otherwise.)

to:

* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
**
''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' features Al Bhed, which is made up of a simple cypher of English/Japanese (depending on which localization of the game you play obviously) but is spoken in the game by the Al Bhed as a real language. As an added feature, the player can pick up 'primers' throughout their visit to Spira and slowly translate the language, letter by letter. This is part of a small NewGamePlus bonus: The next time a player decides to play through the game, if they had collected most/all of the primers before, they can load up their completed 'dictionary' and understand what various characters/signs are saying right from the beginning!
* ** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has "Dragonspeak", a language telepathically "spoken" by dragons, with its own grammatical rules and sentence structure. The voice acting for dragon characters is always in this language, with translations in the text provided by either the [[PlayerCharacter Warrior of Light's]] Echo, or by the dragon in question choosing to have their words understood by the mortals they are speaking to (which is how the Warrior's NPC friends are able to understand them in ''Heavensward''). Outside of dialogue, most dragon words are left untranslated. There exists three separate topics on [[AllThereInTheManual the official forums]] that detail [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/215647-An-Introduction-to-Dragonspeak how the language was created]], [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/265400-A-Lesson-in-Dragonspeak how the language works]], and [[http://forum.square-enix.com/ffxiv/threads/265527-Dragonspeak-Dictionary a dictionary of commonly-used words]].
* ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'': [[http://linguists.riedl.org/old/ D'ni is a completely original version.]]
* The ''[[VideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]'' series
''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'' has Hymmnos, a language vaguely based on English, Japanese, Sanskrit and German. In the setting of the games, it is an obsolete language, used to interface with [[MagicFromTechnology ancient technology in the form of songs]]. Unusually, Hymmnos is a language constructed specifically to express the singer's emotions (with special grammar rules that aid them). Though Hymmnos and one of its dialects (New Testament of Pastalie) are the ones that gets the most attention, the series also has the Carmena Foreluna and Ar Ciela languages, predecessors to Hymmnos. A detailed insight into all three of these can be found [[http://conlang.wikia.com/wiki/Hymmnos here]].
** And its prequel, the ''[[VideoGame/CielNosurge Surge Concerto]]'' series, follows suit with two conlangs: Emotional Song Pact, with glyphs based on the Korean Hangui, and REON-4213, which is practically a programming language.
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a whole host of these, with Common (humans), Orcish (orcs), Darnassian (night elves), Gutterspeak (undead), Dwarven (dwarves), Gnomish (gnomes), Zandali (trolls), Draenei (draenei), and Thalassian (blood elves) barely scratching the surface. An interesting note with the Undead: During the beta for ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' (a.k.a. "Vanilla"), the Undead (being formerly living humans) could
some [=NPCs=] speak Common, acting as "the Old Tongue" (Tho Fan), a Translator between the rival factions. However the player-base's tendency to be... juvenile led directly to the creation mixture of Gutterspeak, and is the primary reason you can never learn additional languages, despite some characters knowing 1-2 Asian languages (Faction and Racial).
** In a note of ingenuity and perhaps an example of metagaming, Players have over-time, made simple translations
specially invented for some of the more commonly spoken enemy chatter as perhaps a way to quickly denote if the enemy player is going to be combative or not. (For example, an Alliance player who says "lol", would be heard by a Horde player as "Bur", and going in the other direction, it would read "Kek", to an Alliance player who encounters a laughing member of the Horde).
** While most people who encounter these languages might cross them off as just made up chatter, there even exists a degree of similar word structure between the Night and Blood Elf languages, given their in-game distant shared ancestry (Darnassian and Thalassian respectively), which shows that the Blizzard creative team probably [[ShownTheirWork Showed Their Work]] in conlanging. Since in-game {{NPC}}s often speak these constructed languages from time to time (battle cries & so forth), any player will inevitably come across some words multiple times, but a complete translation of these languages is unavailable, and only a select number of phrases and words have been [[WordOfGod given official translations by Blizzard]].
** More information can be found here: [[http://www.wowwiki.com/Language World of Warcraft Languages]]
** It should be noted that since these languages appear when
the game "translates" player communication into an unintelligible from for those whose character doesn't know said language, by a translation back into English Canadian linguist. Sadly wasted, unfortunately: the spoken phrases are chosen mostly at random and consist almost entirely of [[EverythingsBetterWithCows cow jokes]]. Their actual purpose is impossible for anything remotely complicated said. The "translation" is intentionally lossy, with many different English letter combinations resulting in to make it less obvious the same "translated" words (e.g. both "you" and "lol" lines of dialog are rendered in Orcish as "bur"). This is done on purpose, to prevent players from being able endlessly recycled to understand what their opponents are saying even if they have translation software on their side. (This not only prevents the Alliance from getting wind of what the Horde is up to and vice-versa, it also prevents rival teams from hurling insults or death threats at one another; the hot-tempered environment of a Battleground would make this a real danger otherwise.)save disc space.



* ''VideoGame/StarFox'' introduced the Dino language (also called Saurian) in ''Star Fox Adventures'' which is used on Dinosaur Planet (Sauria in ''Star Fox Asssault''). Like Al Bhed in ''Final Fantasy X'' it is a cipher language. More info here: [[http://saurian.krystalarchive.com/ Saurian Translator]]
* The ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' series features a universal language used by all of the species, though the Octolings also have their own separate dialect. Unlike the other Creator/{{Nintendo}} series listed, it cannot be reliably translated; WordOfGod says that it's almost completely random, with both the spoken and written parts of language occasionally taking cues from both Japanese and English. In addition, there are also the occasional instances of actual English appearing in the game, such as the [=MakoMart=] stage in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'' having a cereal box with the word "choco" on it amongst its shelves.

to:

* ''VideoGame/StarFox'' introduced the Dino language (also called Saurian) in ''Star Fox Adventures'' which is used on Dinosaur Planet (Sauria in ''Star Fox Asssault''). Like Al Bhed in ''Final Fantasy X'' it ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'': [[http://linguists.riedl.org/old/ D'ni is a cipher language. More info here: [[http://saurian.krystalarchive.com/ Saurian Translator]]
* The ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' series features a universal language used by all of the species, though the Octolings also have their own separate dialect. Unlike the other Creator/{{Nintendo}} series listed, it cannot be reliably translated; WordOfGod says that it's almost
completely random, with both the spoken and written parts of language occasionally taking cues from both Japanese and English. In addition, there are also the occasional instances of actual English appearing in the game, such as the [=MakoMart=] stage in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'' having a cereal box with the word "choco" on it amongst its shelves.original version]].



* Although details didn't really start coming out until later in the ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' series, there is a good bit of detail about the [[CatFolk Kilrathi]] language beyond occasional "color" words.
* ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'' has some [=NPCs=] speak "the Old Tongue" (Tho Fan), a mixture of Asian languages specially invented for the game by a Canadian linguist. Sadly wasted, unfortunately: the spoken phrases are chosen mostly at random and consist almost entirely of [[EverythingsBetterWithCows cow jokes]]. Their actual purpose is to make it less obvious the same lines of dialog are being endlessly recycled to save disc space.

to:

* Although details didn't really start coming out until later ''{{VideoGame/Outcast}}'' has the Talan language, with the growing dictionary provided to the player. Talans will use some words from it when talking to the hero, and there's also a whole song in it, written in the ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' series, there is a good bit of detail about the [[CatFolk Kilrathi]] language beyond occasional "color" words.
* ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'' has some [=NPCs=] speak "the Old Tongue" (Tho Fan), a mixture of Asian languages specially invented for the game by a Canadian linguist. Sadly wasted, unfortunately: the spoken phrases are chosen mostly at random and consist almost entirely of [[EverythingsBetterWithCows cow jokes]]. Their actual purpose is to make it less obvious the same lines of dialog are being endlessly recycled to save disc space.
hero's honor.



* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' will continue the post-millennial tradition of Foreign Conversion conlangs, featuring a new distinct alphabet for Star Fleet Oracle.



* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline2'' will continue the post-millennial tradition of Foreign Conversion conlangs, featuring a new distinct alphabet for Star Fleet Oracle.



* The demon language of Ozkavosh created for the remake of ''VideoGame/DefenseOfTheAncients'' is almost entirely symbolic, full of synonyms and essentially requires context to be understood. It also does not conjugate, and due to the demons' [[ItsAllAboutMe nature]], the word for "self" (Ozh) [[LanguageEqualsThought is both capitalized and emphasized in speech, or in case of another object of emphasis, emphasized more]].

to:

* The demon ''VideoGame/StarFox'' introduced the Dino language (also called Saurian) in ''Star Fox Adventures'' which is used on Dinosaur Planet (Sauria in ''Star Fox Asssault''). Like Al Bhed in ''Final Fantasy X'' it is a cipher language. More info here: [[http://saurian.krystalarchive.com/ Saurian Translator]]
* The ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'' series features a universal language used by all
of Ozkavosh created for the remake of ''VideoGame/DefenseOfTheAncients'' is species, though the Octolings also have their own separate dialect. Unlike the other Creator/{{Nintendo}} series listed, it cannot be reliably translated; WordOfGod says that it's almost entirely symbolic, full of synonyms completely random, with both the spoken and essentially requires context to be understood. It written parts of language occasionally taking cues from both Japanese and English. In addition, there are also does not conjugate, and due to the demons' [[ItsAllAboutMe nature]], occasional instances of actual English appearing in the game, such as the [=MakoMart=] stage in ''VideoGame/Splatoon2'' having a cereal box with the word for "self" (Ozh) [[LanguageEqualsThought is both capitalized and emphasized in speech, or in case of another object of emphasis, emphasized more]]."choco" on it amongst its shelves.



* ''Franchise/DeadSpace'' has [[ChurchOfHappyology Unitology]]'s cypher language, which is often found [[CouldntFindAPen scrawled on the walls in blood]]. It is an Argot language consisting of [[CypherLanguage the ten numbers and 26 letters of the English Alphabet]], [[http://images.wikia.com/deadspace/images/3/3b/Unitology_Symbol.png as well as a few additional symbols.]] It can be translated to reveal several [[http://images.wikia.com/deadspace/images/8/89/Wall-decode3.jpg hidden messages,]] including a few [[EasterEgg easter eggs]]. This even includes the seemingly random symbols that pop up during hallucinations.


Added DiffLines:

* Although details didn't really start coming out until later in the ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' series, there is a good bit of detail about the [[CatFolk Kilrathi]] language beyond occasional "color" words.
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has a whole host of these, with Common (humans), Orcish (orcs), Darnassian (night elves), Gutterspeak (undead), Dwarven (dwarves), Gnomish (gnomes), Zandali (trolls), Draenei (draenei), and Thalassian (blood elves) barely scratching the surface. An interesting note with the Undead: During the beta for ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' (a.k.a. "Vanilla"), the Undead (being formerly living humans) could speak Common, acting as a Translator between the rival factions. However the player-base's tendency to be... juvenile led directly to the creation of Gutterspeak, and is the primary reason you can never learn additional languages, despite some characters knowing 1-2 languages (Faction and Racial).
** In a note of ingenuity and perhaps an example of metagaming, Players have over-time, made simple translations for some of the more commonly spoken enemy chatter as perhaps a way to quickly denote if the enemy player is going to be combative or not. (For example, an Alliance player who says "lol", would be heard by a Horde player as "Bur", and going in the other direction, it would read "Kek", to an Alliance player who encounters a laughing member of the Horde).
** While most people who encounter these languages might cross them off as just made up chatter, there even exists a degree of similar word structure between the Night and Blood Elf languages, given their in-game distant shared ancestry (Darnassian and Thalassian respectively), which shows that the Blizzard creative team probably [[ShownTheirWork Showed Their Work]] in conlanging. Since in-game {{NPC}}s often speak these constructed languages from time to time (battle cries & so forth), any player will inevitably come across some words multiple times, but a complete translation of these languages is unavailable, and only a select number of phrases and words have been [[WordOfGod given official translations by Blizzard]].
** More information can be found here: [[http://www.wowwiki.com/Language World of Warcraft Languages]]
** It should be noted that since these languages appear when the game "translates" player communication into an unintelligible from for those whose character doesn't know said language, a translation back into English is impossible for anything remotely complicated said. The "translation" is intentionally lossy, with many different English letter combinations resulting in the same "translated" words (e.g. both "you" and "lol" are rendered in Orcish as "bur"). This is done on purpose, to prevent players from being able to understand what their opponents are saying even if they have translation software on their side. (This not only prevents the Alliance from getting wind of what the Horde is up to and vice-versa, it also prevents rival teams from hurling insults or death threats at one another; the hot-tempered environment of a Battleground would make this a real danger otherwise).


* The French progressive rock band Music/{{Magma}} invented a language called "Kobaïan" for their albums because they felt French wasn't expressive enough. The constructed language also enabled their albums to sound more alien and prevented people from over-scrutinising the lyrics (although unofficial Kobaïan-French and Kobaïan-English lexicons were constructed by fans, and band leader Christian Vander eventually revealed the meanings of some words). Does it even have to be said that most of the band's albums constitute an extended RockOpera based around the human race settling another planet? No? Didn't think so. TOW has details on the language [[https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kobaïan here.]]

to:

!!! Multiple songs:
* The French progressive rock band Music/{{Magma}} invented a Music/{{Aina}} has ''two'' languages: the more frequently heard Ainian language called "Kobaïan" for their albums because they felt French wasn't expressive enough. The constructed that sounds fairly similar to Quenya (the song "Lalae Amer" is sung entirely in this language) and the harsh and guttural language also enabled their albums to sound more alien and prevented people from over-scrutinising the lyrics (although unofficial Kobaïan-French and Kobaïan-English lexicons were constructed by fans, and band leader Christian Vander eventually revealed the meanings of some words). Does it even have to be said that most of the band's albums constitute an extended RockOpera based around the human race settling another planet? No? Didn't think so. TOW has details on the language [[https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kobaïan here.]]Krakhon.



* In 2005, one of the entries in the Swedish version of the Series/EurovisionSongContest was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Cartio Cameron Cartio's]] "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3o9A7z8U9r0 Roma.]]" WordOfGod is he came up with the language himself.
** In 2003, Urban Trad competed for Belgium with the song "Sanomi", the contest's first entry in a fictional language. It came very close to winning but was beaten by Turkey.
* Music/YukiKajiura's Kajiurago. Nobody besides her knows the meaning of the language. It can be heard in the ''Anime/{{Madlax}}'' theme "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuCCfA8yfug Nowhere]]" and the ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' song "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQXD_wfuroc Credens Justitiam (Mami's Theme).]]"



* S.K. Thoth prayforms in a language of his own creation.
* Following the example of ''Magma,'' their disciples in ''Ruins'' and ''Koenjihyakkei'' (the two of which share some of the same musicians) utilise what appears to be another constructed language for their songs, although unlike the case of Kobaïan (where some of the words have been officially translated to French) it's not known what any of the words mean or indeed whether they mean anything at all. (It's also possible that more than one ConLang is involved, since as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koenji_Hyakkei#Language TOW notes,]] orthography has been known to vary between albums and songs).
* Music/AkikoShikata sometimes uses the conlang of whatever video game's theme she's singing, the most famous example being the Hymmnos lyrics used for several songs in ''[[VideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]''.

to:

* S.K. Thoth prayforms in a language of his own creation.
* Following
Music/YukiKajiura's Kajiurago. Nobody besides her knows the example of ''Magma,'' their disciples in ''Ruins'' and ''Koenjihyakkei'' (the two of which share some meaning of the same musicians) utilise what appears to language. It can be another constructed language for their songs, although unlike heard in the case of Kobaïan (where some of the words have been officially translated to French) it's not known what any of the words mean or indeed whether they mean anything at all. (It's also possible that more than one ConLang is involved, since as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koenji_Hyakkei#Language TOW notes,]] orthography has been known to vary between albums and songs).
* Music/AkikoShikata sometimes uses the conlang of whatever video game's
''Anime/{{Madlax}}'' theme she's singing, "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuCCfA8yfug Nowhere]]" and the most famous example being the Hymmnos lyrics used for several songs in ''[[VideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]''.''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' song "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQXD_wfuroc Credens Justitiam (Mami's Theme)]]".



* siromaru and cranky's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8HRTlkGD4Q "conflict"]] is [[https://remywiki.com/Conflict#Lyrics sung in a made-up language]].

to:

* siromaru The French progressive rock band Music/{{Magma}} invented a language called "Kobaïan" for their albums because they felt French wasn't expressive enough. The constructed language also enabled their albums to sound more alien and cranky's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8HRTlkGD4Q "conflict"]] prevented people from over-scrutinising the lyrics (although unofficial Kobaïan-French and Kobaïan-English lexicons were constructed by fans, and band leader Christian Vander eventually revealed the meanings of some words). Does it even have to be said that most of the band's albums constitute an extended RockOpera based around the human race settling another planet? No? Didn't think so. TOW has details on the language [[https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kobaïan here]]. Following the example of ''Magma,'' their disciples in ''Ruins'' and ''Koenjihyakkei'' (the two of which share some of the same musicians) utilise what appears to be another constructed language for their songs, although unlike the case of Kobaïan (where some of the words have been officially translated to French) it's not known what any of the words mean or indeed whether they mean anything at all. (It's also possible that more than one ConLang is [[https://remywiki.com/Conflict#Lyrics sung in a made-up language]].involved, since as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koenji_Hyakkei#Language TOW notes,]] orthography has been known to vary between albums and songs).



* Music/{{Aina}} has ''two'' languages: the more frequently heard Ainian language that sounds fairly similar to Quenya (the song "Lalae Amer" is sung entirely in this language) and the harsh and guttural language of the Krakhon.

to:

* Music/{{Aina}} has ''two'' languages: Music/AkikoShikata sometimes uses the more frequently heard Ainian language that sounds fairly similar to Quenya (the song "Lalae Amer" is sung entirely in this language) and conlang of whatever video game's theme she's singing, the harsh and guttural most famous example being the Hymmnos lyrics used for several songs in ''[[RVideoGame/ExaPico Ar tonelico]]''.
* S.K. Thoth prayforms in a
language of his own creation.
!!! Single songs:
* siromaru and cranky's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8HRTlkGD4Q "conflict"]] is [[https://remywiki.com/Conflict#Lyrics sung in a made-up language]].
* In 2005, one of
the Krakhon.entries in the Swedish version of the Series/EurovisionSongContest was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cameron_Cartio Cameron Cartio's]] "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3o9A7z8U9r0 Roma.]]" WordOfGod is he came up with the language himself.
* In 2003, Urban Trad competed for Belgium with the song "Sanomi", the contest's first entry in a fictional language. It came very close to winning but was beaten by Turkey.


* ''Series/KamenRiderKuuga'' has the Grongi Language, which is a cipher of Japanese with some words that don't change ("Kuuga" and "Linto") and some grammatical flipping just to screw with the audience. Fans managed to decipher the language, which was never subtitled into Japanese at the time.
** Similarly, ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'' has the language spoken by the Overlords, which is also a cipher of Japanese but unnecessarily more complicated than Grongi. Fans only managed to decipher this language due to closed captioning tracks featuring the phonetics and the translation.
*** With Grongi, the cipher kept the vowel sound and swapped around consonants, some of which repeat; "geemu" ("game") becomes "Gegeru". The Overlord language swaps out consonants and vowels and sometimes adds the final n sound; "ningen" ("human") becomes "Femushinmu".

to:

* In ''Series/{{Encantadia}}'', the inhabitants of the eponymous world speak a language called Encanta, which is inspired by both the Filipino language and Romance languages such as English.
* The book series on which ''Series/TheExpanse'' is based, has a melting-pot language derived from several source languages, and adds hand gestures. In the TV series, Belters (residents of the asteroids) communicate in their language but can code-switch relatively effortlessly between that and English.
* In ''Series/{{Inhumans}}'' a few signs were created for Black Bolt's Inhuman sign language, but his actor, Creator/AnsonMount, took it ''much'' farther, creating hundreds of signs, nearly a functional language. It was carefully made so that ''none'' of it duplicates ASL or any other real-world sign language.
* Franchise/KamenRider:
**
''Series/KamenRiderKuuga'' has the Grongi Language, which is a cipher of Japanese with some words that don't change ("Kuuga" and "Linto") and some grammatical flipping just to screw with the audience. Fans managed to decipher the language, which was never subtitled into Japanese at the time.
** Similarly, ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'' has the language spoken by the Overlords, which is also a cipher of Japanese but unnecessarily more complicated than Grongi. Fans only managed to decipher this language due to closed captioning tracks featuring the phonetics and the translation.
***
translation. With Grongi, the cipher kept the vowel sound and swapped around consonants, some of which repeat; "geemu" ("game") becomes "Gegeru". The Overlord language swaps out consonants and vowels and sometimes adds the final n sound; "ningen" ("human") becomes "Femushinmu".



** For ''Series/EmeraldCity'' he created the Munja'kin language spoken by the people of the same name, and Inha, the tongue the witches use to cast their spells.
*** For this particular example, Inha was divided into four separate dialect, called Earth, Fire, Water, and Air Inha. Peterson did not come up with this idea, but Creator/AnaUlaru, who played Mistress West in the show, did.

to:

** For ''Series/EmeraldCity'' he created the Munja'kin language spoken by the people of the same name, and Inha, the tongue the witches use to cast their spells.
***
spells. For this particular example, Inha was divided into four separate dialect, called Earth, Fire, Water, and Air Inha. Peterson did not come up with this idea, but Creator/AnaUlaru, who played Mistress West in the show, did.



* The book series on which ''Series/TheExpanse'' is based, has a melting-pot language derived from several source languages, and adds hand gestures. In the TV series, Belters (residents of the asteroids) communicate in their language but can code-switch relatively effortlessly between that and English.

to:

* The book series on ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Starting in season 3, Kryptonian characters occasionally speak [[http://kryptonian.info/ "Doyle Kryptonian,"]] which ''Series/TheExpanse'' is based, has a melting-pot fan ConLang attempting to create a reasonable language derived out of all the scraps and hints from several source languages, decades of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}'' media. The show's grammar and adds hand gestures. In the TV series, Belters (residents of the asteroids) communicate in their language but can code-switch relatively effortlessly between that and English.pronunciation is a bit hit-or-miss, though.



* In ''Series/{{Inhumans}}'' a few signs were created for Black Bolt's Inhuman sign language, but his actor, Creator/AnsonMount, took it ''much'' farther, creating hundreds of signs, nearly a functional language. It was carefully made so that ''none'' of it duplicates ASL or any other real-world sign language.
* In ''Series/{{Encantadia}}'', the inhabitants of the eponymous world speak a language called Encanta, which is inspired by both the Filipino language and Romance languages such as English.
* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Starting in season 3, Kryptonian characters occasionally speak [[http://kryptonian.info/ "Doyle Kryptonian,"]] which is a fan ConLang attempting to create a reasonable language out of all the scraps and hints from decades of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}'' media. The show's grammar and pronunciation is a bit hit-or-miss, though.

to:

* In ''Series/{{Inhumans}}'' a few signs were created for Black Bolt's Inhuman sign language, but his actor, Creator/AnsonMount, took it ''much'' farther, creating hundreds of signs, nearly a functional language. It was carefully made so that ''none'' of it duplicates ASL or any other real-world sign language.
* In ''Series/{{Encantadia}}'', the inhabitants of the eponymous world speak a language called Encanta, which is inspired by both the Filipino language and Romance languages such as English.
* ''Series/{{Supergirl 2015}}'': Starting in season 3, Kryptonian characters occasionally speak [[http://kryptonian.info/ "Doyle Kryptonian,"]] which is a fan ConLang attempting to create a reasonable language out of all the scraps and hints from decades of ''ComicBook/{{Superman}}'' media. The show's grammar and pronunciation is a bit hit-or-miss, though.


* Joanne Greenberg's ''I Never Promised You A Rose Garden'' has Yri, the sacred language of Deborah Blau's Kingdom of Yr. It is a secret language, and there is a cover-language based on Latin, a facade for the real thing. To speak regular Yri all the time would be "like powering a firefly with lightning bolts." Deborah actually thinks in Yri and sometimes has difficulty remembering English. It is rich in metaphor and has morphemes to indicate levels of intensity. This language got started because as she entered adolescence, Deborah had begun to have thoughts and experiences that there seemed to be no English words to describe. One word can suffice to explain all the emotions and memories of a single significant day in her life. A doctor who pinch hits for Deborah's regular psychiatrist attempts to dissect Yri as a mishmosh of French, German and Latin. The book is autobiographical, and there actually was such a doctor during Joanne Greenberg's hospital stay; she dismissed Joanne's language (actually called Irian) as bastardized Armenian. [[note]]In the documentary ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPfKc-TknWU Take These Broken Wings]]'', about treating schizophrenia with ordinary psychotherapy and minimal or no medication, Joanne confirmed the language was real, and she still knows words of it.[[/note]]



* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' (and [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium various other works set in the same world]]) is the TropeCodifier. The guy was a language professor at Oxford -- he [[ShownTheirWork knew his stuff]]. His grand dream since his childhood was to create a language. He then realized languages didn't exist in a vacuum - they require people that speak it and a culture in which it developed. As a result, he created [[UpToEleven a world full of languages, language families, and dialects]] ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Middle-earth#List_of_languages just read through them.]]) with an internal history, along with several scripts and modes in which they could be written. Although most of them are not actually fully detailed languages, several are more detailed than others, and at least the Elven languages Quenya and Sindarin are complete enough to be learned and spoken. Indeed, the (Elvish) languages came first, and the setting in which they could be spoken came after. The attempts by fan scholars and creators of adaptations to extrapolate from and expand the existing material are usually referred to as ''Neo-(insert language name)''. Tolkien's languages are not just [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign shoehorned mutilations of existing languages]], but very much their own living languages with unique grammar, orthography, phonemes, pronunciation, and rules.
** If you're wondering, Quenya was heavily influenced by Finnish, and Sindarin was based off of Welsh.
** Tolkien's academic paper [[http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/vice.htm "A Secret Vice"]] was one of the first serious studies of constructed languages as an art form in itself, focusing mostly on his own work and youthful experiments with language. He coined the term ''glossopoeia'' to describe creating languages for artistic purposes.

to:

* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' (and [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium various other works set in the same world]]) is the TropeCodifier. The guy was a language professor at Oxford -- he [[ShownTheirWork knew his stuff]]. His grand dream since his childhood was to create a language. He then realized languages didn't exist in a vacuum - they require people that speak it and a culture in which it developed. As a result, he created [[UpToEleven a world full of languages, language families, and dialects]] ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Middle-earth#List_of_languages just read through them.]]) with an internal history, along with several scripts and modes in which they could be written. Although most of them are not actually fully detailed languages, several are more detailed than others, and at least the Elven languages Quenya (influenced by Finnish) and Sindarin (based off Welsh) are complete enough to be learned and spoken. Indeed, the (Elvish) languages came first, and the setting in which they could be spoken came after. The attempts by fan scholars and creators of adaptations to extrapolate from and expand the existing material are usually referred to as ''Neo-(insert language name)''. Tolkien's languages are not just [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign shoehorned mutilations of existing languages]], but very much their own living languages with unique grammar, orthography, phonemes, pronunciation, and rules.
** If you're wondering, Quenya was heavily influenced by Finnish, and Sindarin was based off of Welsh.
**
rules. Tolkien's academic paper [[http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/vice.htm "A Secret Vice"]] was one of the first serious studies of constructed languages as an art form in itself, focusing mostly on his own work and youthful experiments with language. He coined the term ''glossopoeia'' to describe creating languages for artistic purposes.



* Diane Duane created partial languages for the Vulcans and the "Literature/{{Rihannsu}}" (Romulans) in her ''Franchise/StarTrek'' novels, most of the words of which are given only approximate translations. There was supposed to be a dictionary to go with the ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'' series, along the lines of Marc Okrand's ''The Klingon Dictionary'', but it died in DevelopmentHell. The fans, however, took the groundwork laid in-series and [[http://rihan.org/drupal/ ran with it]]. In-story, the Rihannsu language was originally a direct translation conlang. When the first Rihannsu left Vulcan, they invented a new language -- with very different phonemes, but near-identical grammar, to make it easier to learn -- and started using it immediately, all in an effort to distance themselves from the planet they were leaving. They went back to Old High Vulcan and took it in a different direction, a bit like making up your own Romance language by fiddling with Latin.



!!! Authors who worked on multiple conglangs:



* Diane Duane created partial languages for the Vulcans and the "Literature/{{Rihannsu}}" (Romulans) in her ''Franchise/StarTrek'' novels, most of the words of which are given only approximate translations. There was supposed to be a dictionary to go with the ''Literature/{{Rihannsu}}'' series, along the lines of Marc Okrand's ''The Klingon Dictionary'', but it died in DevelopmentHell. The fans, however, took the groundwork laid in-series and [[http://rihan.org/drupal/ ran with it]].
** In-story, the Rihannsu language was originally a direct translation conlang. When the first Rihannsu left Vulcan, they invented a new language -- with very different phonemes, but near-identical grammar, to make it easier to learn -- and started using it immediately, all in an effort to distance themselves from the planet they were leaving. They went back to Old High Vulcan and took it in a different direction, a bit like making up your own Romance language by fiddling with Latin.



* Joanne Greenberg's ''I Never Promised You A Rose Garden'' has Yri, the sacred language of Deborah Blau's Kingdom of Yr. It is a secret language, and there is a cover-language based on Latin, a facade for the real thing. To speak regular Yri all the time would be "like powering a firefly with lightning bolts." Deborah actually thinks in Yri and sometimes has difficulty remembering English. It is rich in metaphor and has morphemes to indicate levels of intensity. This language got started because as she entered adolescence, Deborah had begun to have thoughts and experiences that there seemed to be no English words to describe. One word can suffice to explain all the emotions and memories of a single significant day in her life. A doctor who pinch hits for Deborah's regular psychiatrist attempts to dissect Yri as a mishmosh of French, German and Latin. The book is autobiographical, and there actually was such a doctor during Joanne Greenberg's hospital stay; she dismissed Joanne's language (actually called Irian) as bastardized Armenian. [[note]]In the documentary ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPfKc-TknWU Take These Broken Wings]]'', about treating schizophrenia with ordinary psychotherapy and minimal or no medication, Joanne confirmed the language was real, and she still knows words of it.[[/note]]


* ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': The ''Nautilus'' crew uses a language that TheProfessor Aronnax cannot recognize, but Verne didn’t bother himself making any word of it except ''"Nautron respoc lorni virch."'' that Aronnax thinks must mean: ''"There's nothing in sight."''. Aronnax describes it like this:
-->''"… a language I didn't recognize. It was a sonorous, harmonious, flexible dialect whose vowels seemed to undergo a highly varied accentuation".''
** Given that the ''Nautilus'' crew is a NGOSuperpower, it makes sense this language is a ConLang '''Completely Original''', designed to replace all the other “continental” languages that were original to each of the crew countries that the crew has abandoned. Aronnax observes that just moments before his death, one of the crew forgets to use that ConLang and ask for help in French. A hungry Ned Land also theorizes:
--> ''"Don't you see, these people have a language all to themselves, a [[ConLang language they've invented just to cause despair in decent people who ask for a little dinner!]] Why, in every country on earth, when you open your mouth, snap your jaws, smack your lips and teeth, isn't that the world's most understandable message? From Quebec to the Tuamotu Islands, from Paris to the Antipodes, doesn't it mean: I'm hungry, give me a bite to eat!"''



* In Creator/SamuelRDelany's ''Literature/Babel17'', Babel-17 itself is an ''in-cinematic universe'' example. It is a language specifically constructed to take advantage of the LanguageEqualsThought trope. Learning Babel-17 has significant effects on the way you think. When Wong first starts to learn the language, she finds it makes certain kinds of strategy puzzles much easier to solve. Later, she also finds it has some additional [[EnemyWithin not-so-pleasant]] effects.



* In Barry B. Longyear's ''Enemy Mine'', two main characters learning the other's language is a major theme - so the readers learn some Dracon along with the protagonist. The language is also used in a couple other stories set in the same cinematic universe.
* In the ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series, there is Karsite and the Kaled'a'in language family (ancient Kaled'a'in, Shin'a'in, and Tayledras). The last three are notable because the second two are dialects of the first which evolved into new languages, and there's a mild language-family resemblance (tale'edras and tayledras, she'chorne and shay'a'chern, etc.).



* SuzetteHadenElgin's ''Native Tongue'' series (''Native Tongue'', ''Judas Rose'', and ''Earthsong'') featured a "women's language", Láadan. Elgin is a linguist, and the language was an attempt to test the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis -- she actually made up the language, and there are [[http://internet.cybermesa.com/~amberwind/ online lessons.]]



* ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' and its companion books give us Sudric, the native language of the Island of Sodor. Influenced by Manx, it appears in the roots of various place names in Awdry's FantasyWorldMap.



* Basic in ''Literature/SpaceCadet''. It's definitely not English, because a psychiatrist offers to speak to the protagonist (who is from North America) in English instead of Basic.



* Ricardo Pinto's ''Literature/TheStoneDanceOfTheChameleon'' has Quya. The opening poem is written out in both Quya and English. There is also a system of glyphs to write Quya in and the name of every chapter is written out in both English and Quya glyphs. Sometimes attention is drawn in the story to a peculiarity of the language -- which completely passes the readers by. [[http://www.ricardopinto.com/work/stone_dance/topics/song_to_the_earth/index.php Hear the author speak it here]].



* Creator/CherryWilder's Literature/{{Torin}} stories include occasional words and phrases (and, at one point, an entire verse of a song translated from English) in the Moruian language, which is developed in sufficient depth for it to have its own puns.
* In ''Literature/TheTraitorGame'', this is combined with [[BilingualBonus Multilingual Bonus]]. Mereish and Evgard combine a multitude of words from different languages spelt weirdly. Also, lots of Latin.



* SuzetteHadenElgin's ''Native Tongue'' series (''Native Tongue'', ''Judas Rose'', and ''Earthsong'') featured a "women's language", Láadan. Elgin is a linguist, and the language was an attempt to test the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis -- she actually made up the language, and there are [[http://internet.cybermesa.com/~amberwind/ online lessons.]]
* Ricardo Pinto's ''Literature/TheStoneDanceOfTheChameleon'' has Quya. The opening poem is written out in both Quya and English. There is also a system of glyphs to write Quya in and the name of every chapter is written out in both English and Quya glyphs. Sometimes attention is drawn in the story to a peculiarity of the language -- which completely passes the readers by. [[http://www.ricardopinto.com/work/stone_dance/topics/song_to_the_earth/index.php Hear the author speak it here.]]
* In the ''Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar'' series, there is Karsite and the Kaled'a'in language family (ancient Kaled'a'in, Shin'a'in, and Tayledras). The last three are notable because the second two are dialects of the first which evolved into new languages, and there's a mild language-family resemblance (tale'edras and tayledras, she'chorne and shay'a'chern, etc.)



* In Barry B. Longyear's ''Enemy Mine'', two main characters learning the other's language is a major theme - so the readers learn some Dracon along with the protagonist. The language is also used in a couple other stories set in the same cinematic universe.



* ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea'': The ''Nautilus'' crew uses a language that TheProfessor Aronnax cannot recognize, but Verne didn’t bother himself making any word of it except ''"Nautron respoc lorni virch."'' that Aronnax thinks must mean: ''"There's nothing in sight."''. Aronnax describes it like this:
-->''"… a language I didn't recognize. It was a sonorous, harmonious, flexible dialect whose vowels seemed to undergo a highly varied accentuation".''
** Given that the ''Nautilus'' crew is a NGOSuperpower, it makes sense this language is a ConLang '''Completely Original''', designed to replace all the other “continental” languages that were original to each of the crew countries that the crew has abandoned. Aronnax observes that just moments before his death, one of the crew forgets to use that ConLang and ask for help in French. A hungry Ned Land also theorizes:
--> ''"Don't you see, these people have a language all to themselves, a [[ConLang language they've invented just to cause despair in decent people who ask for a little dinner!]] Why, in every country on earth, when you open your mouth, snap your jaws, smack your lips and teeth, isn't that the world's most understandable message? From Quebec to the Tuamotu Islands, from Paris to the Antipodes, doesn't it mean: I'm hungry, give me a bite to eat!"''
* ''Literature/TheRailwaySeries'' and its companion books give us Sudric, the native language of the Island of Sodor. Influenced by Manx, it appears in the roots of various place names in Awdry's FantasyWorldMap.
* In ''Literature/TheTraitorGame'', this is combined with [[BilingualBonus Multilingual Bonus]]. Mereish and Evgard combine a multitude of words from different languages spelt weirdly. Also, lots of Latin.



* Basic in ''Literature/SpaceCadet''. It's definitely not English, because a psychiatrist offers to speak to the protagonist (who is from North America) in English instead of Basic.
* Creator/CherryWilder's Literature/{{Torin}} stories include occasional words and phrases (and, at one point, an entire verse of a song translated from English) in the Moruian language, which is developed in sufficient depth for it to have its own puns.
* In Creator/SamuelRDelany's ''Literature/Babel17'', Babel-17 itself is an ''in-cinematic universe'' example. It is a language specifically constructed to take advantage of the LanguageEqualsThought trope. Learning Babel-17 has significant effects on the way you think. When Wong first starts to learn the language, she finds it makes certain kinds of strategy puzzles much easier to solve. Later, she also finds it has some additional [[EnemyWithin not-so-pleasant]] effects.


* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' does this with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newspeak Newspeak,]] which is not a new language but a [[{{Newspeak}} degrading hypersymplification of English]]. Bonus points because an exact guide for the simplification is given.
* ''Literature/{{Anathem}}'' has [[http://monastic.org/orth Orth]].
* The ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' series has lines of Gnommish and Centaurian running along the bottom of each page (omitted in some U.S. editions.) Rather than being graphemes of a full-on ConLang they constitute a CypherLanguage offering an EasterEgg to those who decode them. There are a few spoken Gnommish words such as "d'arvit", which is [[PardonMyKlingon an emphatic swear word]].
* Will Self's novel ''The Book of Dave'' introduces a far future where the common language Mokni (a phoneticised cockney initially quite tricky to read) is peppered with bastardised London cabbie slang since their religious book is the rantings of a present day taxi driver.
* ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nadsat Nadsat,]] created for use by the teenage subculture, based on English but with Russian influences.
* The Franchise/CthulhuMythos fandom gives us [[http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/Rlyehian R'yehian]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aklo Aklo]].
* The water voles who appear in Creator/RobinJarvis' ''[[Literature/DeptfordMice Deptford Mouselets]]'' book ''Whortle's Hope'' have their own language. They refer to the titular character as a "rimpi-too" as that is their word for "field mouse".



* Literature/{{Phenomena}}: has one called milescript that is sorta described which at first sounds like [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elder_Futhark runes]] but are different. It seems to have rules similar to Japanese with some being like kanji and another script being hiragana to assist it. The lack of better describing can be explained by that it was supposed to be a {{Picture Book|s}} series but the publisher wanted it to seem more "mature" (probably because it'd be cheaper to print). There are also many other languages like Aldran, Dragon language, and many more, and scripts but [[Creator/RunenEliassen Eliassen]] seems to have given up on constructing them.
* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' (and [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium various other works set in the same world]]) is the TropeCodifier. The guy was a language professor at Oxford -- he [[ShownTheirWork knew his stuff]]. His grand dream since his childhood was to create a language. He then realized languages didn't exist in a vacuum - they require people that speak it and a culture in which it developed. As a result, he created [[UpToEleven a world full of languages, language families, and dialects]] ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Middle-earth#List_of_languages just read through them.]]) with an internal history, along with several scripts and modes in which they could be written. Although most of them are not actually fully detailed languages, several are more detailed than others, and at least the Elven languages Quenya and Sindarin are complete enough to be learned and spoken. Indeed, the (Elvish) languages came first, and the setting in which they could be spoken came after. The attempts by fan scholars and creators of adaptations to extrapolate from and expand the existing material are usually referred to as ''Neo-(insert language name)''. Tolkien's languages are not just [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign shoehorned mutilations of existing languages]], but very much their own living languages with unique grammar, orthography, phonemes, pronunciation, and rules.
** See also the main page in [[Qu/HomePage Quenya]]
** If you're wondering, Quenya was heavily influenced by Finnish, and Sindarin was based off of Welsh.
** Tolkien's academic paper [[http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/vice.htm "A Secret Vice"]] was one of the first serious studies of constructed languages as an art form in itself, focusing mostly on his own work and youthful experiments with language. He coined the term ''glossopoeia'' to describe creating languages for artistic purposes.

to:

* Literature/{{Phenomena}}: has one called milescript that is sorta described which at first sounds like [[https://en.m.''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' gives us the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elder_Futhark runes]] but are different. It seems to have rules similar to Japanese with some being like kanji and another script being hiragana to assist it. The lack of better describing can be explained by that it was supposed to be a {{Picture Book|s}} series but the publisher wanted it to seem more "mature" (probably because it'd be cheaper to print). There are also many other languages like Aldran, Dragon language, and many more, and scripts but [[Creator/RunenEliassen Eliassen]] seems to have given up on constructing them.
* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' (and [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium various other works set in the same world]]) is the TropeCodifier. The guy was a language professor at Oxford -- he [[ShownTheirWork knew his stuff]]. His grand dream since his childhood was to create a language. He then realized languages didn't exist in a vacuum - they require people that speak it and a culture in which it developed. As a result, he created [[UpToEleven a world full of languages, language families, and dialects]] ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Middle-earth#List_of_languages just read through them.]]) with an internal history, along with several scripts and modes in which they could be written. Although most of them are not actually fully detailed languages, several are more detailed than others, and at least the Elven languages Quenya and Sindarin are complete enough to be learned and spoken. Indeed, the (Elvish) languages came first, and the setting in which they could be spoken came after. The attempts by fan scholars and creators of adaptations to extrapolate from and expand the existing material are usually referred to as ''Neo-(insert language name)''. Tolkien's languages are not just [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign shoehorned mutilations of existing languages]], but very much their own living languages with unique grammar, orthography, phonemes, pronunciation, and rules.
** See also the main page in [[Qu/HomePage Quenya]]
** If you're wondering, Quenya was heavily influenced by Finnish, and Sindarin was based off of Welsh.
** Tolkien's academic paper [[http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/vice.htm "A Secret Vice"]] was one of the first serious studies of constructed languages as an art form in itself, focusing mostly on his own work and youthful experiments with language. He coined the term ''glossopoeia'' to describe creating languages for artistic purposes.
org/wiki/Dwarfs_(Discworld)#Language Kad'k]].



* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' does this with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newspeak Newspeak,]] which is not a new language but a [[{{Newspeak}} degrading hypersymplification of English]]. Bonus points because an exact guide for the simplification is given.

to:

* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' does this with [[http://en.The ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'' has "[[LanguageOfMagic The Ancient Language]]" spoken by elves and magic-users (in which it is impossible to tell a direct lie), and relatively less-detailed languages for dwarves, [[OurOrcsAreDifferent urgals]] and nomadic tribes.
** The "Ancient Language" is based very closely on Old Norse (as per "Foreign Conversion", above), but the Dwarves' language is far, far closer to a true "complete original". Paolini has been known to speak paragraphs in his Dwarvish language when requested to do so at conventions and such.
** English relexification shows in a few places, most notably in the plot point differentiating between "shielded" versus "shield" (the verb). There is no language in the world that forms the transitive past by adding the past tense morpheme to the noun form of the verb--however, in English, the present transitive and the verbal noun happen look the same, which is where the confusion arises. This is seen in a few Germanic languages.
*** Also, "may you be shielded" is NOT the past tense of "may you be a shield". It's the passive non-past optative subjunctive of "to shield," which just happens in English to use the past participle of the verb.
*** The Ancient Language could have the same rule, and probably does, seeing as the only significant difference from English grammar is placing the adjective after the noun.
* Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' (and [[Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium various other works set in the same world]]) is the TropeCodifier. The guy was a language professor at Oxford -- he [[ShownTheirWork knew his stuff]]. His grand dream since his childhood was to create a language. He then realized languages didn't exist in a vacuum - they require people that speak it and a culture in which it developed. As a result, he created [[UpToEleven a world full of languages, language families, and dialects]] ([[http://en.
wikipedia.org/wiki/Newspeak Newspeak,]] org/wiki/Languages_of_Middle-earth#List_of_languages just read through them.]]) with an internal history, along with several scripts and modes in which is they could be written. Although most of them are not a new actually fully detailed languages, several are more detailed than others, and at least the Elven languages Quenya and Sindarin are complete enough to be learned and spoken. Indeed, the (Elvish) languages came first, and the setting in which they could be spoken came after. The attempts by fan scholars and creators of adaptations to extrapolate from and expand the existing material are usually referred to as ''Neo-(insert language name)''. Tolkien's languages are not just [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign shoehorned mutilations of existing languages]], but a [[{{Newspeak}} degrading hypersymplification very much their own living languages with unique grammar, orthography, phonemes, pronunciation, and rules.
** If you're wondering, Quenya was heavily influenced by Finnish, and Sindarin was based off
of English]]. Bonus points Welsh.
** Tolkien's academic paper [[http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/vice.htm "A Secret Vice"]] was one of the first serious studies of constructed languages as an art form in itself, focusing mostly on his own work and youthful experiments with language. He coined the term ''glossopoeia'' to describe creating languages for artistic purposes.
* Literature/{{Phenomena}}: has one called milescript that is sorta described which at first sounds like [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elder_Futhark runes]] but are different. It seems to have rules similar to Japanese with some being like kanji and another script being hiragana to assist it. The lack of better describing can be explained by that it was supposed to be a {{Picture Book|s}} series but the publisher wanted it to seem more "mature" (probably
because an exact guide for the simplification is given.it'd be cheaper to print). There are also many other languages like Aldran, Dragon language, and many more, and scripts but [[Creator/RunenEliassen Eliassen]] seems to have given up on constructing them.



* Creator/CSLewis's ''Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy'' gives us Old Solar, the interplanetary language spoken throughout the Solar System, which is completely constructed from scratch. There are two reason why it no longer exists on Earth ([[CallARabbitASmeerp Thulcandra]]): firstly, because Thulcandra is [[HumansAreBastards "bent"]], i.e., corrupt and cut off from [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Maleldil]], and secondly, because of [[Literature/BookOfGenesis the Tower of Babel]].
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand'' has Martian, which is presented as an essential tool to unlock spiritual potential in humans. The characters spend most of the novel learning the language and, eventually, writing a full dictionary. Interestingly enough, it works almost ''exactly'' the same as Orwell's Newspeak (abolishing the need for synonyms), but would lead to a utopian society, instead of a dystopian one.
* Tad Williams' novel ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' has each animal having its own native tongue, though some animals can learn each others tongues. The book comes with a glossary at the back to help readers understand the terminology. For example, "fela" means "female [cat]" and comes from "Fela Skydancer", the first female cat created by Meerclar Allmother.
* ''Literature/{{Tarzan}}'' gives us [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangani Mangani]].



* ''Literature/AClockworkOrange'' had [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nadsat Nadsat,]] created for use by the teenage subculture, based on English but with Russian influences.
* The Franchise/CthulhuMythos fandom gives us [[http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/Rlyehian R'yehian]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aklo Aklo.]]
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' gives us the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwarfs_(Discworld)#Language Kad'k.]]
* Creator/CSLewis's [[Literature/TheSpaceTrilogy Space Trilogy]] gives us Old Solar, the interplanetary language spoken throughout the Solar System, which is completely constructed from scratch. There are two reason why it no longer exists on Earth ([[CallARabbitASmeerp Thulcandra]]): firstly, because Thulcandra is [[HumansAreBastards "bent"]], i.e., corrupt and cut off from [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Maleldil]], and secondly, because of [[Literature/BookOfGenesis the Tower of Babel]].
* ''Literature/{{Tarzan}}'' gives us [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangani Mangani.]]
* Tad Williams' novel ''Literature/TailchasersSong'' has each animal having its own native tongue, though some animals can learn each others tongues. The book comes with a glossary at the back to help readers understand the terminology. For example, "fela" means "female [cat]" and comes from "Fela Skydancer", the first female cat created by Meerclar Allmother.
* The water voles who appear in Creator/RobinJarvis' ''[[Literature/DeptfordMice Deptford Mouselets]]'' book ''Whortle's Hope'' have their own language. They refer to the titular character as a "rimpi-too" as that is their word for "field mouse".
* Will Self's novel ''The Book of Dave'' introduces a far future where the common language Mokni (a phoneticised cockney initially quite tricky to read) is peppered with bastardised London cabbie slang since their religious book is the rantings of a present day taxi driver.
* The ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'' has "[[LanguageOfMagic The Ancient Language]]" spoken by elves and magic-users (in which it is impossible to tell a direct lie), and relatively less-detailed languages for dwarves, [[OurOrcsAreDifferent urgals]] and nomadic tribes.
** The "Ancient Language" is based very closely on Old Norse (as per "Foreign Conversion", above), but the Dwarves' language is far, far closer to a true "complete original". Paolini has been known to speak paragraphs in his Dwarvish language when requested to do so at conventions and such.
** English relexification shows in a few places, most notably in the plot point differentiating between "shielded" versus "shield" (the verb). There is no language in the world that forms the transitive past by adding the past tense morpheme to the noun form of the verb--however, in English, the present transitive and the verbal noun happen look the same, which is where the confusion arises. This is seen in a few Germanic languages.
*** Also, "may you be shielded" is NOT the past tense of "may you be a shield". It's the passive non-past optative subjunctive of "to shield," which just happens in English to use the past participle of the verb.
*** The Ancient Language could have the same rule, and probably does, seeing as the only significant difference from English grammar is placing the adjective after the noun.
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/StrangerInAStrangeLand'' has Martian, which is presented as an essential tool to unlock spiritual potential in humans. The characters spend most of the novel learning the language and, eventually, writing a full dictionary. Interestingly enough, it works almost ''exactly'' the same as Orwell's Newspeak (abolishing the need for synonyms), but would lead to a utopian society, instead of a dystopian one.



* ''Literature/{{Anathem}}'' has [[http://monastic.org/orth Orth.]]



* The ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' series has lines of Gnommish and Centaurian running along the bottom of each page (omitted in some U.S. editions.) Rather than being graphemes of a full-on ConLang they constitute a CypherLanguage offering an EasterEgg to those who decode them. There are a few spoken Gnommish words such as "d'arvit", which is [[PardonMyKlingon an emphatic swear word]].


* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' represents R2-D2's droid beeping with a series of onomatopoeic beep-like words. These began innocuously enough, but slowly got more complicated until it was eventually revealed in-story (after [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1180.html 1180 strips]]!) that the beeps are a comprehensible language, which Chewbacca has at least partially decoded. It was only at this point that the ''readers'' of the comic became aware that R2's beeps were not just random sounds, thus launching a fan decoding effort using the corpus of previously published strips. This spawned a [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/draakslair/viewtopic.php?t=8454 long discussion thread on the forums]], where readers worked together and realised the language was much richer than anyone had suspected.



* Even Dahm created a few different languages, complete with unique alphabets, for his {{Webcomic/Overside}} comics (''Webcomic/RiceBoy'', ''Webcomic/OrderOfTales'', ''Webcomic/{{Vattu}}''). [[http://wiki.rice-boy.com/wiki/Writing_systems The Overside wiki has an article about them.]]
* ''Webcomic/TheInterstellarTeaHouse'' has Sierk D, one of the languages of the Sierk species, which falls into the "completely original" category. The author will sometimes, in lieu of a comic for the day, provide a [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien-esque]] discussion of Sierk syntax and grammar, or ask the readers to offer phrases for translation. (It's Sierk D because there is also a Sierk A, B, and C, and possibly an E and so forth; Sierk D happens to be the language local to the setting of the story.)

to:

* Even Dahm created a few different languages, complete with unique alphabets, for his {{Webcomic/Overside}} comics (''Webcomic/RiceBoy'', ''Webcomic/OrderOfTales'', ''Webcomic/{{Vattu}}''). [[http://wiki.rice-boy.com/wiki/Writing_systems The Overside wiki has an article about them.]]
* ''Webcomic/TheInterstellarTeaHouse'' has Sierk D, one of the languages of the Sierk species, which falls into the "completely original" category. The author will sometimes, in lieu of a comic for the day, provide a [[Creator/JRRTolkien Tolkien-esque]] discussion of Sierk syntax and grammar, or ask the readers to offer phrases for translation. (It's Sierk D because there is also a Sierk A, B, and C, and possibly an E and so forth; Sierk D happens to be the language local to the setting of the story.)story).



* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' represents R2-D2's droid beeping with a series of onomatopoeic beep-like words. These began innocuously enough, but slowly got more complicated until it was eventually revealed in-story (after [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1180.html 1180 strips]]!) that the beeps are a comprehensible language, which Chewbacca has at least partially decoded. It was only at this point that the ''readers'' of the comic became aware that R2's beeps were not just random sounds, thus launching a fan decoding effort using the corpus of previously published strips. This spawned a [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/draakslair/viewtopic.php?t=8454 long discussion thread on the forums]], where readers worked together and realised the language was much richer than anyone had suspected.

to:

* ''Webcomic/DarthsAndDroids'' represents R2-D2's droid beeping Even Dahm created a few different languages, complete with a series of onomatopoeic beep-like words. These began innocuously enough, but slowly got more complicated until it was eventually revealed in-story (after [[http://www.darthsanddroids.net/episodes/1180.html 1180 strips]]!) that the beeps are a comprehensible language, which Chewbacca unique alphabets, for his {{Webcomic/Overside}} comics (''Webcomic/RiceBoy'', ''Webcomic/OrderOfTales'', ''Webcomic/{{Vattu}}''). [[http://wiki.rice-boy.com/wiki/Writing_systems The Overside wiki has at least partially decoded. It was only at this point that the ''readers'' of the comic became aware that R2's beeps were not just random sounds, thus launching a fan decoding effort using the corpus of previously published strips. This spawned a [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/draakslair/viewtopic.php?t=8454 long discussion thread on the forums]], where readers worked together and realised the language was much richer than anyone had suspected.
an article about them]].

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