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* In the case of the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, it's used as a way to run heavy load games the handheld cannot run otherwise due to technical constraints.

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* In the case of the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, it's used as a way to run heavy load games that the handheld cannot run otherwise due to technical constraints.
constraints, such as ''VideoGame/Hitman3'' which would bring the Switch's [=CPU=] to its knee's.
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* Since the services are subscription based, you are at the mercy of the service to provide you the games you want to play. If the service goes defunct, you lose the ability to play those games as well.

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* Since the services are usually subscription based, you are at the mercy of the service to provide you the games you want to play. If the service goes defunct, you lose the ability to play those games as well.


Cloud gaming is, at its core, a basic premise: stream games from a services server to your laptop or computer, and was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}}, only for video games. The idea is that you connect to a remote server that does all the game's processing; things like the player input, audio, and graphics and game rendering. This allows for two major upsides:

to:

Cloud gaming is, at its core, a basic premise: stream games from a services server to your laptop or computer, and was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}}, only for video games. The idea is that you connect to a remote server that does all the game's processing; things like the player input, audio, and graphics and game rendering. This allows for two major upsides:



* In the case of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, implement backwards compatibility without having to design it into the hardware or software of the unit.

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* PC Hardware can be prohibitively expensive in certain countries due to regional pricing, so cloud gaming services can offer a solution to those who cannot upgrade for any reason.
* In the case of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, it's used to implement backwards compatibility without having to design it into the hardware or software of the unit.
* In the case of the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, it's used as a way to run heavy load games the handheld cannot run otherwise due to technical constraints.


* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when [=OnLive=] was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.

to:

* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when [=OnLive=] was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed the service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections connections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.


* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when [[=OnLive=]] was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.

to:

* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when [[=OnLive=]] [=OnLive=] was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.


* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when {{OnLive}} was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.

to:

* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when {{OnLive}} [[=OnLive=]] was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.


* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when OnLive was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.

to:

* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection, and back when OnLive {{OnLive}} was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.


Cloud gaming was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}} only for video games. The idea is that you can connect to a remote server that does all the game's processing, including player input, AI, physics, audio, and graphics rendering. This allows for two major features:
* Any system capable of connecting to the server can play any game the server is offering. This has broad appeal for users of lower-end computers and mobile devices, allowing them to play games at graphical fidelity possible on higher-end systems.

to:

Cloud gaming is, at its core, a basic premise: stream games from a services server to your laptop or computer, and was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}} {{Creator/Netflix}}, only for video games. The idea is that you can you connect to a remote server that does all the game's processing, including processing; things like the player input, AI, physics, audio, and graphics and game rendering. This allows for two major features:
upsides:
* Any system capable of connecting to the server can play any game the server is offering. This has broad appeal for users of lower-end computers computers, laptops, and mobile devices, allowing them to play games at graphical fidelity only possible on higher-end systems.



On top of this, these services, if they're not free, run on a subscription based system and that allows you to access all of the content.

Despite the positives, people were quick to point out its drawbacks:
* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics was needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being reliable. This isn't so much of a problem today, however.
* If the ping time between you and the server is too much, it creates jarring input lag. This can make many games unplayable

to:

On top of this, these services, if they're not free, run on a subscription based system and that allows you to access all of the content. \n\nDespite However, despite the positives, people were quick to point out its drawbacks:
* When cloud gaming first launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection.connection, and back when OnLive was around in 2009, internet speeds the world over were never consistent enough for thed service to be reliable. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics was are needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams, on top of being reliable. a steady reliable connection. That, and don't live out in the sticks where broadband co9nnections are notoriously bad. This isn't so much of a problem today, however.
however, as US, UK and other respective country initiatives to make reliable internet nationwide a priority.
* If the ping time between you and the server is too much, much (say, a jump between 15ms and 60ms), it creates jarring input lag. lag for the end user, making the game either frustrating to control, or borderline-unplayable. This can make many makes single player games unplayablethe ideal games to sell on cloud gaming services, as they rely less on accurately timed button presses.



* [[UsefulNotes/GoogleStadia Stadia]] - A service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.

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* [[UsefulNotes/GoogleStadia Stadia]] - A service for Website/{{Google}} devices and Chrome.


* [[https://www.playstation.com/en-us/explore/playstation-now/ PlayStation Now]] - For PlayStation family titles.

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* [[https://www.playstation.com/en-us/explore/playstation-now/ PlayStation Now]] - For PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation family titles.


* Project [=xCloud=] - a [[https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/03/12/project-xcloud-choice-for-how-and-when-you-play/ planned]] service for Xbox games.

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* Project [=xCloud=] - a A [[https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/03/12/project-xcloud-choice-for-how-and-when-you-play/ planned]] service for Xbox games.


* [[http://www.onlive.com/ OnLive]], now defunct.
* [[http://www.gaikai.com/ Gaikai]], now owned by Sony.
* [[https://www.playstation.com/en-us/explore/playstation-now/ PlayStation Now]], for PlayStation family titles.
* Project [=xCloud=], a [[https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/03/12/project-xcloud-choice-for-how-and-when-you-play/ planned]] service for Xbox games.
* [[https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/geforce-now/ GeForce Now]], available for PC and mobile devices.
* [[UsefulNotes/GoogleStadia Stadia]], a service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.

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* [[http://www.onlive.com/ OnLive]], now OnLive]] - Now defunct.
* [[http://www.gaikai.com/ Gaikai]], now Gaikai]] - Now owned by Sony.
* [[https://www.playstation.com/en-us/explore/playstation-now/ PlayStation Now]], for Now]] - For PlayStation family titles.
* Project [=xCloud=], [=xCloud=] - a [[https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/03/12/project-xcloud-choice-for-how-and-when-you-play/ planned]] service for Xbox games.
* [[https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/geforce-now/ GeForce Now]], available Now]] - Available for PC and mobile devices.
* [[UsefulNotes/GoogleStadia Stadia]], a Stadia]] - A service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.


* [[https://store.google.com/us/product/stadia Stadia]], a service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.

to:

* [[https://store.google.com/us/product/stadia [[UsefulNotes/GoogleStadia Stadia]], a service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.


* Stadia, an upcoming service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.

to:

* Stadia, an upcoming [[https://store.google.com/us/product/stadia Stadia]], a service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.


* UsefulNotes/Steam [[http://store.steampowered.com In-Home Streaming]]

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* UsefulNotes/Steam UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} [[http://store.steampowered.com In-Home Streaming]]



to:

* Stadia, an upcoming service for Website/{{Google}} Chrome.


Cloud gaming was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}} only for video games. The idea is that you can connect to a remote server that does all the game processing, including rendering graphics and handling the game's input. This allows it so that any system capable of connecting to the server can play any game the server is offering. Some applications of this include having tablets or budget laptops play the same games as top-end gaming rigs or in the case of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, implement backwards compatibility without having to design it into the hardware or software of the unit.

The first downside was that you needed a ''really good'' internet connection. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics was needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams. And of course, it had to be be reliable, a rarity with first-generation cloud gaming services. Originally, cloud gaming such as [=OnLive=] was like an Apple ID meets Origin; designed to trap you in the ecosystem as well as into always-online DRM when you realized that the countless games you've downloaded are ONLY playable with an internet connection.

As of 2017, EA is by far the worst major gaming company on the planet. They were almost as bad when [=OnLive=] was around, yet [=OnLive=] was - despite its small size right up until they closed shop - WORSE than EA is now. Originally, cloud gaming used the [=OnLive=] example. You logged in through a vaguely Steam-like launcher app, but this was no digital distribution service! The problem was that [[BaitAndSwitch it was specifically designed to look like one]]. It wasn't until after you bought a game that people usually realized that it ''didn't'' double as a Steam competitor, but was a leash made using a DSL cable. It was essentially like an Apple ID meets Origin; designed to trap you in the ecosystem when you realized that the countless games you've downloaded are ONLY available online.

While some may have gotten suckered in for a lot of money, most people realized this after the first game, though [=OnLive=] was infamous for disallowing access to their FAQ in any way until you had purchased at least one game. Once the jig was up, this backfired big-time as people decided that Digital Distribution was still the future of gaming. For years afterward, cloud gaming was a failed concept which was hopelessly rigged against the end user and thus a scam; "...had it succeeded," many came to the conclusion, "then gaming would be a wasteland controlled by the likes of [=OnLive=]."

!!1st Generation Cloud Gaming Services
* [[http://www.quakelive.com/ Quake Live]] - For Quake 3 Team Arena only

to:

Cloud gaming was originally designed as a streaming service like {{Creator/Netflix}} only for video games. The idea is that you can connect to a remote server that does all the game game's processing, including rendering player input, AI, physics, audio, and graphics and handling the game's input. rendering. This allows it so that any for two major features:
* Any
system capable of connecting to the server can play any game the server is offering. Some applications This has broad appeal for users of this include having tablets or budget laptops lower-end computers and mobile devices, allowing them to play the same games as top-end gaming rigs or in at graphical fidelity possible on higher-end systems.
* In
the case of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation4, implement backwards compatibility without having to design it into the hardware or software of the unit.

The On top of this, these services, if they're not free, run on a subscription based system and that allows you to access all of the content.

Despite the positives, people were quick to point out its drawbacks:
* When cloud gaming
first downside was that launched, you needed a ''really good'' internet connection. At the minimum a [=1.5Mbps=] for SD graphics was needed, with up to [=8Mbps=] for HD streams. And streams, on top of course, being reliable. This isn't so much of a problem today, however.
* If the ping time between you and the server is too much,
it had creates jarring input lag. This can make many games unplayable
* Since the services are subscription based, you are at the mercy of the service
to be be reliable, provide you the games you want to play. If the service goes defunct, you lose the ability to play those games as well.

If you're looking to play the games you do own, you can use
a rarity with first-generation remote play tool. It's the same concept as cloud gaming services. Originally, cloud gaming such as [=OnLive=] was like an Apple ID meets Origin; designed to trap you in the ecosystem as well as into always-online DRM when you realized that you're having a computer connect to a server to handle all of the countless games you've downloaded are ONLY playable with an internet connection.

As of 2017, EA is by far the worst major gaming company on the planet. They were almost as bad when [=OnLive=] was around, yet [=OnLive=] was - despite its small size right up until they closed shop - WORSE than EA is now. Originally, cloud gaming used the [=OnLive=] example. You logged in through a vaguely Steam-like launcher app, but this was no digital distribution service! The problem was that [[BaitAndSwitch it was specifically designed to look like one]]. It wasn't until after you bought a
game that people usually realized that it ''didn't'' double as a Steam competitor, but was a leash made using a DSL cable. It was essentially like an Apple ID meets Origin; designed to trap you processing. The difference is your computer, or in the ecosystem when you realized that the countless games you've downloaded are ONLY available online.

While
some may have gotten suckered in for a lot of money, most people realized this after cases game console, is the first game, though [=OnLive=] was infamous for disallowing access to their FAQ in any way until you had purchased at least one game. Once the jig was up, this backfired big-time as people decided that Digital Distribution was still the future server.

!!Examples
of gaming. For years afterward, cloud gaming was a failed concept which was hopelessly rigged against the end user and thus a scam; "...had it succeeded," many came to the conclusion, "then gaming would be a wasteland controlled by the likes of [=OnLive=]."

!!1st Generation
Cloud Gaming Services
* [[http://www.quakelive.com/ Quake Live]] - For Quake 3 Team Arena only
Services




As of 2017, however, the basic systems have changed drastically and the result is ''trustworthy'' cloud gaming... well, mostly. It's experiencing growing pains. The idea is now for a full Windows 10 OS installation to be automatically placed in a specialized "datacenter"[[note]] (a physical location, essentially a warehouse but for data and/or the special computers that run websites)[[/note]] housing server racks where each OS is a virtual machine - like [[https://www.virtualbox.org VirtualBox]][[note]] It's not as confusing and technical as it looks. It's basically an emulator except instead of game consoles, MS-DOS or a version of the original Mac OS, it runs modern [=OSes=] including Windows, Linux and some versions of Mac OS X. You can download it [[https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads here]] and, if you're basically clueless with a computer... [[http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/5.1.26/VirtualBox-5.1.26-117224-Win.exe Windows]] (double-click the icon on Windows and grant it permissions) and [[http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/5.1.26/VirtualBox-5.1.26-117224-OSX.dmg Mac]] (double-click the icon on Mac to open the "Disk [=iMaGe=]" and drag the icon for [=VirtualBox=] into the shortcut to the Applications folder), then get someone to install the OS into [=VirtualBox=] for you.[[/note]] meets [[https://anydesk.com/remote-desktop AnyDesk]][[note]] or [=TeamViewer=], but the latter program has some severe security issues; both are examples of "remote desktop software" which enables you to use your laptop to control your desktop, vice-versa, or either with your phone, regardless of OS[[/note]] but specifically for PC gaming and much more optimized to meet that purpose. You still have to log into a special app, but this only serves two purposes...

* It determines the closest datacenter when you sign up, as well as your system specs. The downside to this is twofold...
** If you sign up and your computer is too [[TheAllegedComputer ghetto]] even for cloud gaming, then you'll still need to upgrade your tower's components (if you use one) or buy a new laptop[[note]] (if said [[TheAllegedComputer crappy computer is a laptop]], the "snapshot" nature of its state upon purchase means an entire new machine must be used)[[/note]]. Additionally, your internet speed is part of the spec check, so if you live in the developing world or {{UsefulNotes/Australia}}[[note]] Australia is infamous for still mostly using dial-up over copper while the world switches from broadband to fiber-optic; even New Zealand and Singapore are moving forward[[/note]], you're almost certainly screwed.
** If you are too far from any datacenter (for [=LiquidSky=] this is 1500 km, and servers are not evenly distributed globally) then you will automatically be rejected. This literally means that to use cloud gaming you would have to ''move to another city'' and quite possibly ''another country'' to get access. Also, the "cloud gaming PC" is stored on a given datacenter; if it is experiencing issues at a given time, this can range form denying access to the datacenter you selected (a feature available on [=PlayKey=], but said service is not available in North America as of July 2017) to have your computer installed at being unavailable at an inconvenient point in time, to the datacenter automatically selected for you without giving any options for otherwise (used in [=LiquidSky=]) being the only one on the planet with a GameBreakingBug that keeps new accounts from being registered[[note]] (the [=LiquidSky=] server in San José had this issue for weeks, and contacting support about it was a Catch22Dilemma; to get free support on the forums you needed an account which had to be created through the application which had said bug, and to have support by phone you needed to be a paying customer which also obviously required a functioning account)[[/note]]. No contact info for [=LiquidSky=]'s offices in New York are viewable online as of May 2017, meaning that getting help on such an issue is literally impossible.
* Provided you can successfully get into the service and get a paid subscription, your cloud gaming PC is installed in the datacenter chosen for you; the application acts as a highly-optimized remote-access application à la [=AnyDesk=], enabling you to access the virtual machine from a long distance away. The only issue with this not listed above is that if you on a long trip to somewhere far from home (a vacation, travelling to the opposite coast of a continent other than Europe, travelling to another continent), and want to access said datacenter... well, that's not happening.

A lot of issues for sure. It does mean several upsides, however...
* You can literally download anything you want onto it, provided it is legal. Torrents, even legal ones, are grounds for a permanent ban on a cloud PC due to their common use in pirating games, and since they don't (and shouldn't) explicitly spy on your activity but detect all torrent traffic automatically, cloud gaming services can't prove either way and thus were forced to use this rule. As long as no torrents are used and no sites with illicit (as in the kind usually restricted to the [=DarkNet=]) activity accessed, everything else is up to you.
* Any game that is legally downloaded solely via the internet for whatever reason, such as OpenTTD (open-source and thus downloaded with a browser) or StarCitizen (the alpha is installed via a launcher), or a useful application such as a Mod Manager, Launchbox, Open Broadcasting Software or [=GameSave=] Manager, is green lights all the way.
* You don't even ''need'' to be worried about Digital Distribution, it's already there. Cloud gaming (save for NVIDIA [=GeForce=] Now[[note]] which is so draconian that it's basically the SpiritualSuccessor to [=OnLive=][[/note]]) services have shortcut buttons which auto-install them, from {{UsefulNotes/Steam}} to [[Website/GOGDotCom GOG Galaxy]] to {{UsefulNotes/DESURA}} to [[Creator/BlizzardEntertainment Battle.net]] to ''[[{{CopyProtection/Ubisoft}} uPlay]]''[[note]] which is required for Ubisoft titles on Steam[[/note]] to EA's [[CopyProtection/ElectronicArts Origin]].
* If you own a game on physical media, you can install it on your cloud gaming PC, although the installation speed may be severely hampered or require a disk image be uploaded to the cloud PC.
* These services tend to have tiers for the cloud [=PCs=], and if you have a subscription which lapses they can and often ''will'' wipe the virtual machine from their systems. That said, provided that you keep backups of non-Steam game data and data from games which do not support Steam Cloud, you can otherwise turn on Steam Cloud or equivalent in another digital distribution program and not worry too much about it. Note that if you have a higher tier and choose to downgrade, often any cloud [=PCs=] which had higher-tier features will be wiped. This may not be true of [=PlayKey=], but as it is only available in Europe currently, this is indeterminable.
** Snoosh (listed below) seems to be free of all these issues, but requires you to use Google Chrome for the plugin needed[[note]] (''Not'' Chromium on Linux, not Opera, not Canary, not Vivaldi, not Brave. Chrome. All the other Chromium browsers listed, the most trustworthy and useful variants, don't support the extension and it's not available from the Chrome Store.)[[/note]] which may annoy anyone who insists on using Firefox, really likes Safari coming with their Mac, or wants to avoid "Big Data".
* MOST IMPORTANTLY: Any and all games you install on a 2nd-gen cloud gaming PC use traditional ownership, not the proprietary system of 1st-gen services. If you install a game off the internet, it's as if you installed it on a normal gaming PC. If you install it from Steam or buy it on Steam (or any other Digital Distribution method) it's owned as is normal for Steam (or equivalent). If you install it via physical media, you still keep the disk (but avoid old SecuROM games from EA on disk like the plague regardless of how you play games, they have unreasonably tiny and often-unrecoverable install limits AND get revoked by hardware changes). Software works as normal. Provided that you or the original source of the game still have a copy to install, it's not going to disappear if your cloud gaming provider does.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services
* If you want the benefits of a free service with the ease of a commercial product, take a look at [[https://parsec.tv Parsec]].
* UsefulNotes/Steam [[http://store.steampowered.com In-Home Streaming]] should suit your needs if you just want to be able to move around the house while playing PC games, provided you have reliable WiFi.
* [[https://www.gamefly.com/#!/streaming GameFly]] has been around for a while, originally a mail-rental service like pre-streaming Netflix, and just like Netflix they went full cloud. Unlike OnLive, the issue of not actually owning the games and having to play them online is a bit more acceptable, as you can only rent the games.
* [[http://gaminganywhere.org GamingAnywhere]], an open-source cloud gaming software solution. Install a server on your Windows 7+/Mac [=OS=] X/Linux gaming rig, a client on whatever Windows XP+/Mac [=OS=] X/Linux/Android 4.1+ device you want, and that's the basic idea. Best option if you already have the hardware and are into technical stuff/want to go [=Open-Source=], but needs special URLs for each and every game and won't play new AAA titles well.
* Got Mac? [=GamingAnywhere=] too complex and inconvenient? A formerly tough problem with an easy solution... ''[[https://gamingsolved.com/en/mac Gaming: Solved.]]''
* [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] has a 3 day trial period; try it and then decide if it's worth subscribing for about double the price of competitors, as on paper, it claims far more than LiquidSky which has been the go-to company for a while. It also uses a Chrome Extension instead of a launcher.
* Speaking of which, [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]] is the closest a cloud gaming service comes to Steam Sales, with periodic discounts for subscribing within a given period. Subscribe to the newsletter to get notified of such, but don't make an impulse buy unless you're sure nothing else works for you as they've been struggling with tech issues since entering the paid beta (see ''Cloud Gaming Services that Gamers hate...'' below). Uses a launcher and ''will'' check your specs as well as auto-choose your datacenter, so if it can't get through due to a glitch or no servers being near you, you're screwed.
* Веб-страница основы [[http://www.loud-play.com LoudPlay]] is a Russian cloud gaming service; similar to [=PlayKey=], another Russian-based cloud gaming company. The closest equivalents in the Western Hemipshere are [[http://leapcomputing.com/Consumer/tablet/index.html Leap Computing]], [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] and [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]].
* Веб-страница основы [[https://playkey.net PlayKey]] is another Russian cloud gaming service, similar to [=LoudPlay=]. The closest equivalents in the Western Hemipshere are [[http://leapcomputing.com/Consumer/tablet/index.html Leap Computing]], [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] and [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]].
* [[http://gcluster.jp/ G集り]]のエンド ユーザーの場所, the Japanese-based game streaming service called [[http://gcluster.jp/ G-Cluster]], whose primary aim is [[http://www.broadmedia.co.jp/en/outline/content/game/ towards business-level clients such as game developers or publishers]] as a cloud gaming middleman to the players. As the site is unreadable unless you know Japanese, take it with a grain of salt to avoid potential disappointment.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services in Development (Updated in July, 2017)
* N/A

!!Notable 2nd Generation Business-focused Cloud gaming Systems
* Cloud Gaming eXtreme is Amazon's version of this, but similarly to the business-focused [=G-Cluster=] and Ubitus Game Cloud, it's aimed mostly at supporting games using the Amazon [=LumberYard=] engine based off of the [=CryEngine=] code. StarCitizen intends to run on the service as they switched the [=StarEngine=] code base from [=CryEngine=] to [=LumberYard=] after Crytek went under. The idea is that games using [=LumberYard=] can be easily given networking, so provided such games become common and people play them, Amazon is in for the long haul.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services that Gamers hate...
* ''NVIDIA [=GeForce=] Now'' is a draconian system with huge limits on what is allowed with "your" cloud PC. Avoid it like the plague.
* [=LiquidSky=]. Their code and the infrastructure they contracted out has been having teething issues that are more like a pre-mature birth in how critical the problems are.

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\nAs of 2017, however, the basic systems have changed drastically and the result is ''trustworthy'' cloud gaming... well, mostly. It's experiencing growing pains. The idea is now for a full Windows 10 OS installation to be automatically placed in a specialized "datacenter"[[note]] (a physical location, essentially a warehouse but for data and/or the special computers that run websites)[[/note]] housing server racks where each OS is a virtual machine - like * [[https://www.virtualbox.org VirtualBox]][[note]] It's not as confusing and technical as it looks. It's basically an emulator except instead of game consoles, MS-DOS or playstation.com/en-us/explore/playstation-now/ PlayStation Now]], for PlayStation family titles.
* Project [=xCloud=],
a version of the original Mac OS, it runs modern [=OSes=] including Windows, Linux and some versions of Mac OS X. You can download it [[https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/03/12/project-xcloud-choice-for-how-and-when-you-play/ planned]] service for Xbox games.
*
[[https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads here]] and, if you're basically clueless with a computer... [[http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/5.1.26/VirtualBox-5.1.26-117224-Win.exe Windows]] (double-click the icon on Windows and grant it permissions) and [[http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/5.1.26/VirtualBox-5.1.26-117224-OSX.dmg Mac]] (double-click the icon on Mac to open the "Disk [=iMaGe=]" and drag the icon for [=VirtualBox=] into the shortcut to the Applications folder), then get someone to install the OS into [=VirtualBox=] for you.[[/note]] meets [[https://anydesk.com/remote-desktop AnyDesk]][[note]] or [=TeamViewer=], but the latter program has some severe security issues; both are examples of "remote desktop software" which enables you to use your laptop to control your desktop, vice-versa, or either with your phone, regardless of OS[[/note]] but specifically for PC gaming and much more optimized to meet that purpose. You still have to log into a special app, but this only serves two purposes...

* It determines the closest datacenter when you sign up, as well as your system specs. The downside to this is twofold...
** If you sign up and your computer is too [[TheAllegedComputer ghetto]] even for cloud gaming, then you'll still need to upgrade your tower's components (if you use one) or buy a new laptop[[note]] (if said [[TheAllegedComputer crappy computer is a laptop]], the "snapshot" nature of its state upon purchase means an entire new machine must be used)[[/note]]. Additionally, your internet speed is part of the spec check, so if you live in the developing world or {{UsefulNotes/Australia}}[[note]] Australia is infamous for still mostly using dial-up over copper while the world switches from broadband to fiber-optic; even New Zealand and Singapore are moving forward[[/note]], you're almost certainly screwed.
** If you are too far from any datacenter (for [=LiquidSky=] this is 1500 km, and servers are not evenly distributed globally) then you will automatically be rejected. This literally means that to use cloud gaming you would have to ''move to another city'' and quite possibly ''another country'' to get access. Also, the "cloud gaming PC" is stored on a given datacenter; if it is experiencing issues at a given time, this can range form denying access to the datacenter you selected (a feature
nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/geforce-now/ GeForce Now]], available on [=PlayKey=], but said service is not available in North America as of July 2017) to have your computer installed at being unavailable at an inconvenient point in time, to the datacenter automatically selected for you without giving any options for otherwise (used in [=LiquidSky=]) being the only one on the planet with a GameBreakingBug that keeps new accounts from being registered[[note]] (the [=LiquidSky=] server in San José had this issue for weeks, PC and contacting support about it was a Catch22Dilemma; to get free support on the forums you needed an account which had to be created through the application which had said bug, and to have support by phone you needed to be a paying customer which also obviously required a functioning account)[[/note]]. No contact info for [=LiquidSky=]'s offices in New York are viewable online as mobile devices.

!!Examples
of May 2017, meaning that getting help on such an issue is literally impossible.
* Provided you can successfully get into the service and get a paid subscription, your cloud gaming PC is installed in the datacenter chosen for you; the application acts as a highly-optimized remote-access application à la [=AnyDesk=], enabling you to access the virtual machine from a long distance away. The only issue with this not listed above is that if you on a long trip to somewhere far from home (a vacation, travelling to the opposite coast of a continent other than Europe, travelling to another continent), and want to access said datacenter... well, that's not happening.

A lot of issues for sure. It does mean several upsides, however...
* You can literally download anything you want onto it, provided it is legal. Torrents, even legal ones, are grounds for a permanent ban on a cloud PC due to their common use in pirating games, and since they don't (and shouldn't) explicitly spy on your activity but detect all torrent traffic automatically, cloud gaming services can't prove either way and thus were forced to use this rule. As long as no torrents are used and no sites with illicit (as in the kind usually restricted to the [=DarkNet=]) activity accessed, everything else is up to you.
* Any game that is legally downloaded solely via the internet for whatever reason, such as OpenTTD (open-source and thus downloaded with a browser) or StarCitizen (the alpha is installed via a launcher), or a useful application such as a Mod Manager, Launchbox, Open Broadcasting Software or [=GameSave=] Manager, is green lights all the way.
* You don't even ''need'' to be worried about Digital Distribution, it's already there. Cloud gaming (save for NVIDIA [=GeForce=] Now[[note]] which is so draconian that it's basically the SpiritualSuccessor to [=OnLive=][[/note]]) services have shortcut buttons which auto-install them, from {{UsefulNotes/Steam}} to [[Website/GOGDotCom GOG Galaxy]] to {{UsefulNotes/DESURA}} to [[Creator/BlizzardEntertainment Battle.net]] to ''[[{{CopyProtection/Ubisoft}} uPlay]]''[[note]] which is required for Ubisoft titles on Steam[[/note]] to EA's [[CopyProtection/ElectronicArts Origin]].
* If you own a game on physical media, you can install it on your cloud gaming PC, although the installation speed may be severely hampered or require a disk image be uploaded to the cloud PC.
* These services tend to have tiers for the cloud [=PCs=], and if you have a subscription which lapses they can and often ''will'' wipe the virtual machine from their systems. That said, provided that you keep backups of non-Steam game data and data from games which do not support Steam Cloud, you can otherwise turn on Steam Cloud or equivalent in another digital distribution program and not worry too much about it. Note that if you have a higher tier and choose to downgrade, often any cloud [=PCs=] which had higher-tier features will be wiped. This may not be true of [=PlayKey=], but as it is only available in Europe currently, this is indeterminable.
** Snoosh (listed below) seems to be free of all these issues, but requires you to use Google Chrome for the plugin needed[[note]] (''Not'' Chromium on Linux, not Opera, not Canary, not Vivaldi, not Brave. Chrome. All the other Chromium browsers listed, the most trustworthy and useful variants, don't support the extension and it's not available from the Chrome Store.)[[/note]] which may annoy anyone who insists on using Firefox, really likes Safari coming with their Mac, or wants to avoid "Big Data".
* MOST IMPORTANTLY: Any and all games you install on a 2nd-gen cloud gaming PC use traditional ownership, not the proprietary system of 1st-gen services. If you install a game off the internet, it's as if you installed it on a normal gaming PC. If you install it from Steam or buy it on Steam (or any other Digital Distribution method) it's owned as is normal for Steam (or equivalent). If you install it via physical media, you still keep the disk (but avoid old SecuROM games from EA on disk like the plague regardless of how you
remote play games, they have unreasonably tiny and often-unrecoverable install limits AND get revoked by hardware changes). Software works as normal. Provided that you or the original source of the game still have a copy to install, it's not going to disappear if your cloud gaming provider does.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services
* If you want the benefits of a free service with the ease of a commercial product, take a look at [[https://parsec.tv Parsec]].
software
* UsefulNotes/Steam [[http://store.steampowered.com In-Home Streaming]] should suit your needs if you just want to be able to move around the house while playing PC games, provided you have reliable WiFi.
Streaming]]
* [[https://www.gamefly.com/#!/streaming GameFly]] has been around for a while, originally a mail-rental service like pre-streaming Netflix, and just like Netflix they went full cloud. Unlike OnLive, the issue of not actually owning the games and having to play them online is a bit more acceptable, as you can only rent the games.
[[https://parsec.tv Parsec]]
* [[https://remoteplay.dl.playstation.net/remoteplay/lang/en/index.html PS4 Remote Play]]
* [[http://gaminganywhere.org GamingAnywhere]], an open-source cloud gaming software solution. Install a server on your Windows 7+/Mac [=OS=] X/Linux gaming rig, a client on whatever Windows XP+/Mac [=OS=] X/Linux/Android 4.1+ device you want, and that's the basic idea. Best option if you already have the hardware and are into technical stuff/want to go [=Open-Source=], but needs special URLs for each and every game and won't play new AAA titles well.
* Got Mac? [=GamingAnywhere=] too complex and inconvenient? A formerly tough problem with an easy solution... ''[[https://gamingsolved.com/en/mac Gaming: Solved.]]''
* [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] has a 3 day trial period; try it and then decide if it's worth subscribing for about double the price of competitors, as on paper, it claims far more than LiquidSky which has been the go-to company for a while. It also uses a Chrome Extension instead of a launcher.
* Speaking of which, [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]] is the closest a cloud gaming service comes to Steam Sales, with periodic discounts for subscribing within a given period. Subscribe to the newsletter to get notified of such, but don't make an impulse buy unless you're sure nothing else works for you as they've been struggling with tech issues since entering the paid beta (see ''Cloud
org/ Gaming Services that Gamers hate...'' below). Uses a launcher and ''will'' check your specs as well as auto-choose your datacenter, so if it can't get through due to a glitch or no servers being near you, you're screwed.
* Веб-страница основы [[http://www.loud-play.com LoudPlay]] is a Russian cloud gaming service; similar to [=PlayKey=], another Russian-based cloud gaming company. The closest equivalents in the Western Hemipshere are [[http://leapcomputing.com/Consumer/tablet/index.html Leap Computing]], [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] and [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]].
* Веб-страница основы [[https://playkey.net PlayKey]] is another Russian cloud gaming service, similar to [=LoudPlay=]. The closest equivalents in the Western Hemipshere are [[http://leapcomputing.com/Consumer/tablet/index.html Leap Computing]], [[https://www.snoost.com/ Snoost]] and [[https://liquidsky.com LiquidSky]].
* [[http://gcluster.jp/ G集り]]のエンド ユーザーの場所, the Japanese-based game streaming service called [[http://gcluster.jp/ G-Cluster]], whose primary aim is [[http://www.broadmedia.co.jp/en/outline/content/game/ towards business-level clients such as game developers or publishers]] as a cloud gaming middleman to the players. As the site is unreadable unless you know Japanese, take it with a grain of salt to avoid potential disappointment.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services in Development (Updated in July, 2017)
* N/A

!!Notable 2nd Generation Business-focused Cloud gaming Systems
* Cloud Gaming eXtreme is Amazon's version of this, but similarly to the business-focused [=G-Cluster=] and Ubitus Game Cloud, it's aimed mostly at supporting games using the Amazon [=LumberYard=] engine based off of the [=CryEngine=] code. StarCitizen intends to run on the service as they switched the [=StarEngine=] code base from [=CryEngine=] to [=LumberYard=] after Crytek went under. The idea is that games using [=LumberYard=] can be easily given networking, so provided such games become common and people play them, Amazon is in for the long haul.

!!2nd Generation Cloud Gaming Services that Gamers hate...
* ''NVIDIA [=GeForce=] Now'' is a draconian system with huge limits on what is allowed with "your" cloud PC. Avoid it like the plague.
* [=LiquidSky=]. Their code and the infrastructure they contracted out has been having teething issues that are more like a pre-mature birth in how critical the problems are.

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