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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', episode "Tacking Into The Wind", where the Klingon Chancellor Gowron is screwing things up during the Dominion War, mismanaging the Klingon battle efforts to humiliate and disgrace the popular General Martok (who he fears will challenge him for leadership). In truth, Martok is too honorable and loyal to the Empire to even consider trying to take control for himself. After some harsh truths from Dax about Klingon politics, Worf realizes that SOMEONE has to challenge Gowron on honorable grounds (such as calling him on intentionally mismanaging the war out of fear for losing his position). [[spoiler:Worf does challenge him, wins, becomes the next Chancellor, but almost immediately passes the torch to the most honorable and capable Klingon he knows (as well as his friend and mentor), General Martok]].

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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', episode "Tacking Into The Wind", where ''Series/The100'': There is a [[PlayingWithATrope variation ]]in season 3. Queen Nia of the Klingon Chancellor Gowron is screwing things up during Ice Nation challenges Lexa's position as the Dominion War, mismanaging Grounder Commander and selects her son to fight Lexa in a TrialByCombat. However, neither Nia nor Roan can become the Klingon battle efforts to humiliate and disgrace new Commander if Lexa is defeated: the popular General Martok (who he fears title will instead descend onto one of the [[RoyalBlood Nightbloods]]. Nia hopes that Ontari, an Ice Nation Nightblood, will become the new Commander.
* In ''Series/BabylonFive'', the Narn appear to use this, with G'Kar periodically having to fend off threats to his authority over the Narns on the station. The Minbari have their own version, with a twist: [[spoiler: the
challenge him for leadership). In truth, Martok is too honorable to stand in an increasingly lethal energy beam; the winner is the one who ''doesn't'' chicken out and loyal to leave the Empire energy beam first. [[DoomedMoralVictor The position of the one who remained (and died) would be considered the superior one]]. However, when Delenn and Shakiri end up "battling" this way, Shakiri leaves the beam first. Shakiri's subordinate, Neroon, then wonders why Delenn doesn't leave the beam afterward, [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee as they'd apparently discussed in the previous episode off-camera]], only then learning that she meant to even consider trying sacrifice herself ''for real''. Not wanting to take control for see this happen, Neroon enters the beam himself, removing Delenn from danger and remaining there himself. After some harsh truths Then, just before expiring, Neroon announces his conversion from Dax about Klingon politics, Worf realizes that SOMEONE has to challenge Gowron on honorable grounds (such as calling him on intentionally mismanaging the war out of fear for losing his position). [[spoiler:Worf does challenge him, wins, becomes the next Chancellor, but almost immediately passes the torch Warrior Caste to the most honorable and capable Klingon he knows (as well as his friend and mentor), General Martok]].Religious Caste, thus giving them the victory]].
* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story ''Ghost Light'', the villainous Josiah plans to murder Queen Victoria under the delusion that the British monarchy works like this.



* In the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story ''Ghost Light'', the villainous Josiah plans to murder Queen Victoria under the delusion that the British monarchy works like this.
* In ''Series/BabylonFive'', the Narn appear to use this, with G'Kar periodically having to fend off threats to his authority over the Narns on the station. The Minbari have their own version, with a twist: [[spoiler: the challenge is to stand in an increasingly lethal energy beam; the winner is the one who ''doesn't'' chicken out and leave the energy beam first. [[DoomedMoralVictor The position of the one who remained (and died) would be considered the superior one]]. However, when Delenn and Shakiri end up "battling" this way, Shakiri leaves the beam first. Shakiri's subordinate, Neroon, then wonders why Delenn doesn't leave the beam afterward, [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee as they'd apparently discussed in the previous episode off-camera]], only then learning that she meant to sacrifice herself ''for real''. Not wanting to see this happen, Neroon enters the beam himself, removing Delenn from danger and remaining there himself. Then, just before expiring, Neroon announces his conversion from the Warrior Caste to the Religious Caste, thus giving them the victory]].

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* In ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', episode "Tacking Into The Wind", where the ''Series/DoctorWho'' story ''Ghost Light'', Klingon Chancellor Gowron is screwing things up during the villainous Josiah plans to murder Queen Victoria under Dominion War, mismanaging the delusion that Klingon battle efforts to humiliate and disgrace the British monarchy works like this.
* In ''Series/BabylonFive'', the Narn appear to use this, with G'Kar periodically having to fend off threats to his authority over the Narns on the station. The Minbari have their own version, with a twist: [[spoiler: the
popular General Martok (who he fears will challenge him for leadership). In truth, Martok is too honorable and loyal to stand in an increasingly lethal energy beam; the winner is the one who ''doesn't'' chicken out and leave the energy beam first. [[DoomedMoralVictor The position of the one who remained (and died) would be considered the superior one]]. However, when Delenn and Shakiri end up "battling" this way, Shakiri leaves the beam first. Shakiri's subordinate, Neroon, then wonders why Delenn doesn't leave the beam afterward, [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee as they'd apparently discussed in the previous episode off-camera]], only then learning that she meant Empire to sacrifice herself ''for real''. Not wanting even consider trying to see this happen, Neroon enters the beam himself, removing Delenn from danger and remaining there take control for himself. Then, just before expiring, Neroon announces his conversion After some harsh truths from Dax about Klingon politics, Worf realizes that SOMEONE has to challenge Gowron on honorable grounds (such as calling him on intentionally mismanaging the Warrior Caste war out of fear for losing his position). [[spoiler:Worf does challenge him, wins, becomes the next Chancellor, but almost immediately passes the torch to the Religious Caste, thus giving them the victory]].most honorable and capable Klingon he knows (as well as his friend and mentor), General Martok]].

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** A fourth Mak'Gora is seen at the end of the ''Battle for Azeroth'' war campaign. [[spoiler:Tired of all the death the recent Horde-Alliance war has caused, Varok Saurfang challenges Sylvannas Windrunner for the position of Warchief, hoping to avoid a bloody battle with a single death. When Varok gains the upper hand, Sylvannas kills him with magic, which also forfeits the Mak'Gora, and she flees afterwards.]]



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* ''TabletopGame/ArsMagica'': One prerequisite for the title of [[TheArchmage Archmage]] is to defeat a sitting Archmage at a challenge of their own design -- sometimes a WizardDuel, sometimes a bizarre CookingDuel. The sitting Archmage isn't deposed, but after seven losses, they can't be challenged again and are widely seen as disgraced, so it's very bad form in MagicalSociety to challenge one who's suffered five or six losses.


** Garrosh ultimately becomes warchief, and is himself challenged by Cairne Bloodhoof. It is however a ploy - Cairne intended to lose in order to cement Garrosh's wildly unpopular leadership and save the Horde from civil war. Garrosh's weapon was poisoned, unbeknownst to him, and he ends up killing Cairne.

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** Garrosh ultimately becomes warchief, and is himself challenged by Cairne Bloodhoof. It is however a ploy - Cairne intended to lose in order to cement Garrosh's wildly unpopular leadership and save the Horde from civil war. Garrosh's weapon was poisoned, unbeknownst to him, both fighters, and he ends up killing Cairne.


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-->--'''Lex Luthor''', ''Series/LoisAndClark'' ("The Phoenix")

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-->--'''Lex -->-- '''Lex Luthor''', ''Series/LoisAndClark'' ("The Phoenix")


* In ''Film/ButchCassidyAndTheSundanceKid'', Butch had apparently stated prior to the events of the film that anyone who wanted to could challenge him for leadership. Butch set this rule because he thought nobody would ever take him up on it, but early in the film the biggest, meanest member of his gang does just that. Through a combination of [[GuileHero Guile]] and being willing to [[FightingDirty Fight Dirty]], Butch manages to win despite the fact that he shouldn't have had a chance in the fight. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPqhm36sjVE Enjoy it for yourself]]

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* In ''Film/ButchCassidyAndTheSundanceKid'', Butch had apparently stated prior to the events of the film that anyone who wanted to could challenge him for leadership. Butch set this rule because he thought nobody would ever take him up on it, but early in the film the biggest, meanest member of his gang does just that. Through a combination of [[GuileHero Guile]] and being willing to [[FightingDirty Fight Dirty]], [[CombatPragmatist fight dirty]], Butch manages to win despite the fact that he shouldn't have had a chance in the fight. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPqhm36sjVE Enjoy it for yourself]]


* In ''Series/BabylonFive'', the Narn appear to use this, with G'Kar periodically having to fend off threats to his authority over the Narns on the station. The Minbari have their own version, with a twist: [[spoiler: the challenge is to stand in an increasingly lethal energy beam; the winner is the one who doesn't chicken out and leave the energy beam first. The winner dies, but his faction's position is deemed superior. However, when Delenn and Neroon end up "battling" this way, Neroon leaves the beam first. As Delenn is about to die, Neroon has a WhatHaveIDone moment and jumps back in to push Delenn out. Then, just before expiring, he announces his conversion from the Warrior Caste to the Religious Caste, thus giving them the victory]].
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* In ''Series/BabylonFive'', the Narn appear to use this, with G'Kar periodically having to fend off threats to his authority over the Narns on the station. The Minbari have their own version, with a twist: [[spoiler: the challenge is to stand in an increasingly lethal energy beam; the winner is the one who doesn't ''doesn't'' chicken out and leave the energy beam first. first. [[DoomedMoralVictor The winner dies, but his faction's position is deemed superior. of the one who remained (and died) would be considered the superior one]]. However, when Delenn and Neroon Shakiri end up "battling" this way, Neroon Shakiri leaves the beam first. As first. Shakiri's subordinate, Neroon, then wonders why Delenn is about doesn't leave the beam afterward, [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee as they'd apparently discussed in the previous episode off-camera]], only then learning that she meant to die, sacrifice herself ''for real''. Not wanting to see this happen, Neroon has a WhatHaveIDone moment and jumps back in to push enters the beam himself, removing Delenn out. from danger and remaining there himself. Then, just before expiring, he Neroon announces his conversion from the Warrior Caste to the Religious Caste, thus giving them the victory]].
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* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' has a system in which during the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.

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* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' ''Film/{{Black Panther|2018}}'' has a system in which during the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.


* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', several factions require you to defeat the current leader in order to take their place, including the Fighters' Guild, the Mages' Guild, and Houses Redoran and Telvanni. (In the case of the Telvanni, it's more of a KlingonPromotion.) (There is a peaceful way to become head of the Mages' Guild, but it is both harder to find out and leaves you co-head of the Guild along with an idiot, rather than sole head.) Interestingly, the [[MurderInc Morag Tong]] ''inverts'' this trope. "Challenging the chief" is, per their rules, the standard way to become the leader. However, the current leader is perfectly fine stepping aside when it's time for you to take the reigns.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', several factions require you to defeat the current leader in order to take their place, including the Fighters' Guild, the Mages' Guild, and Houses Redoran and Telvanni. (In the case of the Telvanni, it's although it is not the supposed usual approach for any of them but Telvanni (for whom, along with the Fighters', it is more of a KlingonPromotion.) (There KlingonPromotion) -- there is a peaceful way to become head of the Mages' Guild, but it is both harder to find out and and, depending on interpretation, either leaves you co-head of the Guild along with an idiot, rather than sole head.) head, or at least lets the idiot keep a prestigious title. Interestingly, the [[MurderInc Morag Tong]] ''inverts'' the usual approach to this trope. "Challenging the chief" is, per their rules, the standard way to become the leader. However, the current leader is perfectly fine stepping aside when it's time for you to take the reigns.


* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' has a system in which immediately before the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.

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* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' has a system in which immediately before the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.


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* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' has a system in which during the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.



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* The Kingdom of Wakanda in ''Film/BlackPanther'' has a system in which immediately before the coronation ceremony, nobles with royal blood from each of the five constituent tribes are given the opportunity to challenge the crown prince in a fight to the death/submission. The winner becomes the new king of Wakanda. By the time of the film, the challenge ritual seems to have becomes a minor point of formality kept for tradition's sake. When M'Baku ''actually'' challenges T'Challa for the throne, everyone is genuinely shocked.


* In ''DawnOfThePlanetOfTheApes'' this is how [[spoiler: Caesar retakes his position as leader of the apes from Koba, after surviving Koba's false flag assassination attempt. The apes want to be ruled by "the strongest" so Caesar has to prove he is stronger than Koba.]].

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* In ''DawnOfThePlanetOfTheApes'' ''Film/DawnOfThePlanetOfTheApes'' this is how [[spoiler: Caesar retakes his position as leader of the apes from Koba, after surviving Koba's false flag assassination attempt. The apes want to be ruled by "the strongest" so Caesar has to prove he is stronger than Koba.]].

Added DiffLines:

* In ''DawnOfThePlanetOfTheApes'' this is how [[spoiler: Caesar retakes his position as leader of the apes from Koba, after surviving Koba's false flag assassination attempt. The apes want to be ruled by "the strongest" so Caesar has to prove he is stronger than Koba.]].


There can be variations on how ritualized the challenge is. Sometimes a spontaneous fight could occur and then everybody makes sure everybody else hangs back to let the two [[{{Pun}} duke]] it out. On other occasions, the right to challenge may need to be specifically invoked, maybe with a particular phrase. In such a case you can very well expect the crowd to make a collective intake of breath and you get double points in the TVTropesDrinkingGame if the challenged chief was walking away but then stops and slowly turns around. There also may or may not be a strict rule that the loser has to die. If there is, you may get TheHero in an ethical quandary if they believe ThouShaltNotKill.

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There can be variations on how ritualized the challenge is. Sometimes a spontaneous fight could occur and then everybody makes sure everybody else hangs back to let the two [[{{Pun}} duke]] it out. On other occasions, the right to challenge may need to be specifically invoked, maybe with a particular phrase. In such a case you can very well expect the crowd to make a collective intake of breath and you get double points in the TVTropesDrinkingGame DrinkingGame/TVTropesDrinkingGame if the challenged chief was walking away but then stops and slowly turns around. There also may or may not be a strict rule that the loser has to die. If there is, you may get TheHero in an ethical quandary if they believe ThouShaltNotKill.

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