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** {{Discussed}} in "Where Silence Has Lease" by Picard when Data asks him what happens when you die. Picard rejects both this view and {{Heaven}}, stating he thinks the afterlife is beyond our comprehension.


** ''Mortalism'' is the term for the view that the soul is not naturally immortal, but dies with the body. The opposite view, naturally, is called ''immortalism''. Christian mortalism encompasses the annihilationist/conditionalist view described above, but the term can also describe any view that human beings have no immortal soul.
* The common Western misconception (not helped by mistranslations as the West began to make contact with the East) of Buddhist Nirvana is this - certainly not helped by Buddhism's teachings to be free of suffering, inherent in life. In reality, Nirvana is more of a [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence "super-state" of sorts beyond all existence, impurity, and physicality]], but it's more complicated than that.

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** ''Mortalism'' is the term for the view that the soul is not naturally immortal, but dies with the body. The opposite view, naturally, is called ''immortalism''. Christian mortalism encompasses the annihilationist/conditionalist annihilationist or conditionalist view described above, but the term can also describe any view that human beings have no immortal soul.
* The common Western misconception (not helped by mistranslations as the West began to make contact with the East) of Buddhist Nirvana is this - certainly not helped by Buddhism's teachings to be free of suffering, inherent in life. In reality, Nirvana is more of a [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence "super-state" of sorts beyond all existence, impurity, and physicality]], but it's more complicated than that. However, it does involve ceasing to exist as a specific, individual person, something Buddhism regards as only an illusion that is overcome by enlightenment.


* Guess what? ''This'' is what happens when you are kissed by a [[EldritchAbomination dementor]] in the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. And the Ministry actually [[DisproportionateRetribution used this as a form of punishment]]...

to:

* Guess what? ''This'' is what happens when you are kissed by a [[EldritchAbomination dementor]] in the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series.series, since they lose their soul. And the Ministry actually [[DisproportionateRetribution used this as a form of punishment]]...



* ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'': The elves and the dragons believe this happens when living things die. It's left unknown if they're right though.

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* ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'': The elves and the dragons believe this happens when living things die. It's left unknown if they're right though. die, presumably due to their natural telepathic abilities, as living minds always simply fade and disappear during death. In the end, Eragon himself admits that he would prefer this option to some form of eternal existence.


** There's Xion, too. She was classified as the newest member of the Organization, but found out she was nothing more than a "cage" used to hold Sora's memories of Kairi as a part of Xemas's plans. Her only purpose of existing was to be used as a Sora copy if both Sora and Roxas fail to be of use. Even worse, Namine tells Xion that if she dies, everyone will forget who she is, and no one will ever know she existed. To stop Xemnas and essentially save the day, she tricks Roxas into giving her fatal injuries, which cause the memories that kept her alive to return to Sora, causing her to die. As Namine predicted, she is soon forgotten, although it's hinted she retains some form of sentience within Sora.

to:

** There's Xion, too. She was classified as the newest member of the Organization, but found out she was nothing more than a "cage" used to hold Sora's memories of Kairi as a part of Xemas's Xemnas' plans. Her only purpose of existing was to be used as a Sora copy if both Sora and Roxas fail to be of use. Even worse, Namine tells Xion that if she dies, everyone will forget who she is, and no one will ever know she existed. To stop Xemnas and essentially save the day, she tricks Roxas into giving her fatal injuries, which cause the memories that kept her alive to return to Sora, causing her to die. As Namine predicted, she is soon forgotten, although it's hinted she retains some form of sentience within Sora.


** Michael (an immortal and near-omniscient supernatural being as old as time itself) completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at first and then having a HollywoodMidlifeCrisis over it. It's all PlayedForLaughs.

to:

** In the aptly titled episode "Existential Crisis", Michael (an immortal and near-omniscient supernatural being as old as time itself) completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at first and then having a HollywoodMidlifeCrisis over it. It's all PlayedForLaughs.


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** ** In "The Funeral to End All Funerals", the threat of this hangs over '''''all of humanity''''', living and dead alike, when [[spoiler:the Judge decides to reboot all of existence because the world and humans in general have become too complex for the points system to judge effectively rather than find some way to fix the system itself]].


* ''Series/Watchmen2019'': Angela's husband Cal tells their daughters this happens when they argue over whether Jedd is in heaven or not. She doesn't appear to be entirely happy with this, but he says it's just the truth.

to:

* ''Series/Watchmen2019'': Angela's husband Cal tells their daughters this happens when they argue over whether Jedd [[spoiler:Judd]] is in heaven or not. She doesn't appear to be entirely happy with this, but he says it's just the truth.


*** In the Season Nine comics, Illyria sacrifices herself to restore magic to the world, and somehow this results in Fred being brought back to life in Season Ten. And even stranger, Illyria is still inside Fred, even though Fred's body is fully human.

to:

*** ** In the Season Nine comics, Illyria sacrifices herself to restore magic to the world, and somehow this results in Fred being brought back to life in Season Ten. And even stranger, Illyria is still inside Fred, even though Fred's body is fully human.



** This trope is actually subverted at several points throughout the series' of Star Trek, the most notable subversion is the Voyager episode "Barge of the Dead", where B'Elanna is nearly killed in a shuttle accident (similar to how Neelix temporarily dies) and in her near death experience, she learns that her mother is on the road to Klingon Hell, so she re-creates the conditions of the accident to go back to the "barge of the dead" and tries to get her mother into Klingon Heaven. She succeeds.
*** This subversion initially seems to be subverted at the end, when her mother reveals that she's not really dead, if her words that they'll meet when B'Elanna "returns home" can be taken at face value. However, a future episode indicates that she really is dead, and thus the entire experience was probably real.

to:

** This trope is actually subverted at several points throughout the series' of Star Trek, the most notable subversion is the Voyager episode "Barge of the Dead", where B'Elanna is nearly killed in a shuttle accident (similar to how Neelix temporarily dies) and in her near death experience, she learns that her mother is on the road to Klingon Hell, so she re-creates the conditions of the accident to go back to the "barge of the dead" and tries to get her mother into Klingon Heaven. She succeeds.
***
succeeds. This subversion initially seems to be subverted at the end, when her mother reveals that she's not really dead, if her words that they'll meet when B'Elanna "returns home" can be taken at face value. However, a future episode indicates that she really is dead, and thus the entire experience was probably real.



*** If the creature that came back with Owen is any indication, there's a reason to fear what's beyond.
** Surprisingly, however, "Random Shoes" has a (slightly) kinder take on this trope (or maybe not. [[MST3KMantra It's the Whoniverse; just go with it.]]). After the main character for that episode completes his unfinished business, the audience is given the image of an incredibly fast zoom-out from the Earth, with us suddenly hearing the main character's speech falter and we see nothing but [[{{Foreshadowing}} silent nothingness.]]
*** He did swallow an alien artifact, so that may have something to do with it.

to:

*** ** If the creature that came back with Owen is any indication, there's a reason to fear what's beyond.
** Surprisingly, however, "Random Shoes" has a (slightly) kinder take on this trope (or maybe not. [[MST3KMantra It's the Whoniverse; just go with it.]]). After the main character for that episode completes his unfinished business, the audience is given the image of an incredibly fast zoom-out from the Earth, with us suddenly hearing the main character's speech falter and we see nothing but [[{{Foreshadowing}} silent nothingness.]]
*** He
nothingness]] (he did swallow an alien artifact, so that may have something to do with it.it).
* ''Series/Watchmen2019'': Angela's husband Cal tells their daughters this happens when they argue over whether Jedd is in heaven or not. She doesn't appear to be entirely happy with this, but he says it's just the truth.


This is when you die, and you cease to exist. No afterlife. No feeling, no thought, no perception, no existence. Your existence -- everything you ''were'' -- simply disappears like a popped soap bubble.

to:

This is when you die, and you cease to exist. No afterlife. No feeling, no thought, no perception, no existence. Your existence -- everything you ''were'' -- simply disappears like a popped soap bubble.



Not to be confused with TheNothingAfterDeath, where you still exist, if only as a mere shade floating between nothing and nowhere. Also not to be confused with FadingAway -- that's when you die and your ''body'' ceases to exist.

to:

Not to be confused with TheNothingAfterDeath, where you still exist, if only as a mere shade floating between nothing and nowhere. Also not to be confused with FadingAway -- that's when you die and your ''body'' ceases to exist.



* In ''Manga/DeathNote'', Ryuk tells Light that since he's used the Death Note, he can go neither to heaven nor hell, but instead "Mu," or nothingness. At the end of the series, a flashback that shows the entirety of that scene occurs, where Light deduces (correctly) that that Cessation isn't exclusive to Death Note users; there's no afterlife for ''anyone.'' This is confirmed onscreen by Ryuk, as well as by [[AllThereInTheManual the Rules of the Death Note]] shown between chapters, WordOfGod, and an EyeCatch in the anime.

to:

* In ''Manga/DeathNote'', Ryuk tells Light that since he's used the Death Note, he can go neither to heaven nor hell, but instead "Mu," "Mu", or nothingness. At the end of the series, a flashback that shows the entirety of that scene occurs, where Light deduces (correctly) that that Cessation isn't exclusive to Death Note users; there's no afterlife for ''anyone.'' This is confirmed onscreen by Ryuk, as well as by [[AllThereInTheManual the Rules of the Death Note]] shown between chapters, WordOfGod, and an EyeCatch in the anime.



[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes:
** Calvin ponders this on a number of occasions, wondering what the point of human existence can possibly be if it's just going to end someday. In at least one case he concludes that since everyone is going to die and stay dead forever, there was no reason to abide by any rules, and he decides to [[TheUnfettered lead a life of shameless hedonism]] (which is immediately kiboshed by his parents). [[TheAntiNihilist Hobbes is more accepting of this possibility, pointing out that life is quite wonderful even if it's finite, so we should be grateful.]]
** It's also very vague as to whether Hobbes experiences this [[NoOntologicalInertia when Calvin is not around or not looking at him]]. Evidence exists for both arguments.
* In ''ComicStrip/LifeInHell'', Bongo swats a fly, and then asks Binky what happens after someone dies. Binky responds that people believe all kinds of things, but the reasonable ones believe exactly in this trope, prompting Bongo to apologize to the fly.
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[[folder:Films -- Animation]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animation]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones:'' Upon her meeting with the Brotherhood Without Banners, Melisandre learns that her fellow Red Priest Thoros of Myr has brought [[spoiler: Beric Dondarrion]] back from the dead no less than six times. When her curiosity overcomes her shock, she asks him what is on "the other side". He replies "There is no other side. I have been to the darkness, my lady." She is visibly perturbed on hearing this. [[spoiler: After she resurrects Jon Snow, he gives more or less the same answer to the question.]]

to:

[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones:'' Upon ''Series/AmericanGods'': Laura believed this happened when you died, but is proven dead wrong when she's met by [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Anubis]]. The punishment for believing this is apparently being sent into [[TheNothingAfterDeath "nothing" and "darkness"]]. She escapes though.
* Discussed in the episode "Shady Acres" of ''Series/AnotherPeriod''. Beatrice has an existential crisis after realizing that ''everyone'' dies. In
her meeting apathy, she goes on and on about how doing anything is useless because everyone'll die either way and how there's nothing after death. Beatrice gets over her depression when her brother tells her that a life's savings can actually keep you from dying.
* Head Six claims that this is what happens to those who die on Kobol in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''.
* ''Series/BlackMirror'':
** In [[Recap/BlackMirrorSanJunipero "San Junipero"]], Kelly believes this happens when you die. It serves as one of the reasons why she was reluctant to become a permanent resident of the eponymous ArtificialAfterlife, since she was certain she'd never see her [[OutlivingOnesOffspring daughter]] and husband (who refused to be uploaded because their daughter never got their opportunity and to whom Kelly promised she'd die naturally as well) again. However, at the end, Kelly decides to go into San Junipero to be
with Yorkie, her SecondLove.
** In "[[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister USS Callister]]", this is
the Brotherhood Without Banners, Melisandre learns that her fellow Red Priest Thoros of Myr has brought [[spoiler: Beric Dondarrion]] back from crew's goal, to escape the dead no less than six times. When her curiosity overcomes her shock, she asks him what is on "the other side". He replies "There is no other side. I have been to living hell of the darkness, my lady." She is visibly perturbed on hearing this. [[spoiler: After she resurrects Jon Snow, he gives more or less game Daly created as his own personal power fantasy, and going into a wormhole which represents the same answer to update patch will do it. However, since Daly can just copy them again, they blackmail the question.original Nanette into stealing his DNA samples too. [[spoiler:Ultimately subverted - they are uploaded into the actual online game, free to explore the universe.]]



* This, along with RetGone, is the fate of anyone who falls into a Time Crack in ''Series/DoctorWho'', during the Eleventh Doctor's first season.

to:

* ''Series/Conviction2016'': Hayes says this happens when you die, telling one death row prisoner he will be "worm food". She regrets this after he's executed, although she had wished he would go to {{heaven}} like he wanted beforehand.
* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
This, along with RetGone, is the fate of anyone who falls into a Time Crack in ''Series/DoctorWho'', during the Eleventh Doctor's cracks in time running rampant in Series 5.
* In ''Literature/TheFallen'' mini-series, a mortally-wounded FallenAngel reveals that if a fallen angel dies before being redeemed, he or she simply ceases to exist (prompting [[TheChosenOne Aaron]] to redeem him). Given what they know about the afterlife, this fate is horrifying to them. Presumably, any of the Powers who are killed are simply returned to Heaven, although Archangel Michael implies that the Powers are also being punished by the Creator.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** In season 1 John and Aeryn are stranded in a damaged transport pod which is venting atmosphere, and at one point Crichton begins discussing the concept of the afterlife. After Crichton mentions the belief of some humans in the existence of heaven, Aeryn retorts that Peacekeepers believe there's nothing after death. As part of a gambit to repair their pod, Aeryn is forced to administer a "kill shot" that will stop John's biological functions long enough to complete the repairs. When she revives him again she asks if he saw all the things he mentioned to her in their earlier discussion, but John confesses he saw nothing. He does offer the suggestion that maybe he didn't because it simply wasn't his time.
** As a Stykera, Stark is strongly connected to the spirits of the dead, making it very clear that an afterlife of sorts ''does'' exist in the universe; he's able to be manipulated by and communicate with the spirits of the dead, and the strain of crossing the dying over has largely contributed to his instability. He once even brings a message back from [[spoiler:Zhaan]] to comfort Rygel.
* ''Series/GameOfThrones:'' Upon her meeting with the Brotherhood Without Banners, Melisandre learns that her fellow Red Priest Thoros of Myr has brought [[spoiler: Beric Dondarrion]] back from the dead no less than six times. When her curiosity overcomes her shock, she asks him what is on "the other side". He replies "There is no other side. I have been to the darkness, my lady." She is visibly perturbed on hearing this. [[spoiler: After she resurrects Jon Snow, he gives more or less the same answer to the question.]]
* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': Averted, as much of the series takes place in an explicit afterlife divided between the {{heaven}}ly Good Place and the {{hell}}ish Bad Place. Thus, it's more of a discussed trope.
** Michael (an immortal and near-omniscient supernatural being as old as time itself) completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at
first season.and then having a HollywoodMidlifeCrisis over it. It's all PlayedForLaughs.
** Simone, being a doctor in neuroscience, seems to believe this is what happens after death. When she [[spoiler:dies and goes into the afterlife as one of the four subjects chosen for a new Fake Good Place experiment, she refuses to believe anything is real and believes everyone and everything she's seeing is just an intense DyingDream]]. Michael mentions having met a few people that believed the same; they usually began to realize the afterlife was real after [[spoiler:a good few torture sessions]].
* ''Series/{{House}}'' is utterly convinced that there is nothing after death. At one point, he is told that there is no way he can know for sure that that's true. He then induces clinical death on himself and does not have a near-death experience. That's all the proof he needs that he was right all along. Well, maybe. Or maybe that's just House's hereafter.
* ''Series/OrangeIsTheNewBlack'': Taystee asserts that when you're dead that's it and ghosts aren't real as Suzanne tries to call up Poussey's spirit in a séance.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' features most electronic lifeforms believing in Silicon Heaven, an afterlife for such items ('Where the ion lies down with the amp.'). They themselves think of humans' heaven as foolishness. [[spoiler:One episode has Kryten use this as a LogicBomb against the monster of the week, a mad mechanoid.]]
-->''Then where do all the calculators go?''\\
''They just die.''
* [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] in ''Series/{{Rome}}'' between Marc Antony and Lucius Vorenus as the former prepares himself for his own suicide after his historic defeat against Caesar Augustus. They get drunk and start waxing philosophical about the prospects of life after death, or whether this life is really all there is and they'll just vanish after death.



* ''Series/SwitchedAtBirth'': {{Discussed}} by Regina and John. He believes there's some afterlife where you can meet your loved ones again, but Regina doesn't, unfortunate as she finds that.



--->'''Gwen''': So when you die, it's just—
--->'''Suzie''': Darkness.
--->'''Gwen''': And you're all alone, there's no one else?
--->'''Suzie''': I didn't say that.
--->'''Gwen''': What d'you mean?
--->'''Suzie''': Why do you think I'm so desperate to come back? There's something out there... in the dark. And it's moving.

to:

--->'''Gwen''': So when you die, it's just—
--->'''Suzie''': Darkness.
--->'''Gwen''':
just—\\
'''Suzie''': Darkness.\\
'''Gwen''':
And you're all alone, there's no one else?
--->'''Suzie''':
else?\\
'''Suzie''':
I didn't say that.
--->'''Gwen''':
that.\\
'''Gwen''':
What d'you mean?
--->'''Suzie''':
mean?\\
'''Suzie''':
Why do you think I'm so desperate to come back? There's something out there... in the dark. And it's moving.



** Surprisingly, however, the episode "Random Shoes" has a (slightly) kinder take on this trope (or maybe not. [[MST3KMantra It's the Whoniverse; just go with it.]]). After the main character for that episode completes his unfinished business, the audience is given the image of an incredibly fast zoom-out from the Earth, with us suddenly hearing the main character's speech falter and we see nothing but [[{{Foreshadowing}} silent nothingness.]]

to:

** Surprisingly, however, the episode "Random Shoes" has a (slightly) kinder take on this trope (or maybe not. [[MST3KMantra It's the Whoniverse; just go with it.]]). After the main character for that episode completes his unfinished business, the audience is given the image of an incredibly fast zoom-out from the Earth, with us suddenly hearing the main character's speech falter and we see nothing but [[{{Foreshadowing}} silent nothingness.]]



* ''Series/{{House}}'' is utterly convinced that there is nothing after death. At one point, he is told that there is no way he can know for sure that that's true. He then induces clinical death on himself and does not have a near-death experience. That's all the proof he needs that he was right all along. Well, maybe. Or maybe that's just House's hereafter.
* Head Six claims that this is what happens to those who die on Kobol in ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''.
* In ''Literature/TheFallen'' mini-series, a mortally-wounded FallenAngel reveals that if a fallen angel dies before being redeemed, he or she simply ceases to exist (prompting [[TheChosenOne Aaron]] to redeem him). Given what they know about the afterlife, this fate is horrifying to them. Presumably, any of the Powers who are killed are simply returned to Heaven, although Archangel Michael implies that the Powers are also being punished by the Creator.
* ''Series/BlackMirror'':
** In ''[[Recap/BlackMirrorSanJunipero San Junipero]]'', Kelly believes this happens when you die. It serves as one of the reasons why she was reluctant to become a permanent resident of the eponymous ArtificialAfterlife, since she was certain she'd never see her [[OutlivingOnesOffspring daughter]] and husband (who refused to be uploaded because their daughter never got their opportunity and to whom Kelly promised she'd die naturally as well) again. However, at the end, Kelly decides to go into San Junipero to be with Yorkie, her SecondLove.
** In "[[Recap/BlackMirrorUSSCallister USS Callister]]", this is the crew's goal, to escape the living hell of the game Daly created as his own personal power fantasy, and going into a wormhole which represents the update patch will do it. However, since Daly can just copy them again, they blackmail the original Nanette into stealing his DNA samples too. [[spoiler:Ultimately subverted - they are uploaded into the actual online game, free to explore the universe.]]
* ''Series/Conviction2016'': Hayes says this happens when you die, telling one death row prisoner he will be "worm food". She regrets this after he's executed, although she had wished he would go to {{heaven}} like he wanted beforehand.
* ''Series/AmericanGods'': Laura believed this happened when you died, but is proven dead wrong when she's met by [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Anubis]]. The punishment for believing this is apparently being sent into [[TheNothingAfterDeath "nothing" and "darkness"]]. She escapes though.
* [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] in ''Series/{{Rome}}'' between Marc Antony and Lucius Vorenus as the former prepares himself for his own suicide after his historic defeat against Caesar Augustus. They get drunk and start waxing philosophical about the prospects of life after death, or whether this life is really all there is and they'll just vanish after death.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** In season 1 John and Aeryn are stranded in a damaged transport pod which is venting atmosphere, and at one point Crichton begins discussing the concept of the afterlife. After Crichton mentions the belief of some humans in the existence of heaven, Aeryn retorts that Peacekeepers believe there's nothing after death. As part of a gambit to repair their pod, Aeryn is forced to administer a "kill shot" that will stop John's biological functions long enough to complete the repairs. When she revives him again she asks if he saw all the things he mentioned to her in their earlier discussion, but John confesses he saw nothing. He does offer the suggestion that maybe he didn't because it simply wasn't his time.
** As a Stykera, Stark is strongly connected to the spirits of the dead, making it very clear that an afterlife of sorts ''does'' exist in the universe; he's able to be manipulated by and communicate with the spirits of the dead, and the strain of crossing the dying over has largely contributed to his instability. He once even brings a message back from [[spoiler:Zhaan]] to comfort Rygel.
* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': Averted, as much of the series takes place in an explicit afterlife divided between the {{heaven}}ly Good Place and the {{hell}}ish Bad Place. Thus, it's more of a discussed trope.
** Michael (an immortal and near-omniscient supernatural being as old as time itself) completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at first and then having a HollywoodMidlifeCrisis over it. It's all PlayedForLaughs.
** Simone, being a doctor in neuroscience, seems to believe this is what happens after death. When she [[spoiler:dies and goes into the afterlife as one of the four subjects chosen for a new Fake Good Place experiment, she refuses to believe anything is real and believes everyone and everything she's seeing is just an intense DyingDream]]. Michael mentions having met a few people that believed the same; they usually began to realize the afterlife was real after [[spoiler:a good few torture sessions]].
* Discussed in the episode "Shady Acres" of ''Series/AnotherPeriod''. Beatrice has an existential crisis after realizing that ''everyone'' dies. In her apathy, she goes on and on about how doing anything is useless because everyone'll die either way and how there's nothing after death. Beatrice gets over her depression when her brother tells her that a life's savings can actually keep you from dying.
* ''Series/RedDwarf'' features most electronic lifeforms believing in Silicon Heaven, an afterlife for such items ('Where the ion lies down with the amp.'). They themselves think of humans' heaven as foolishness. [[spoiler:One episode has Kryten use this as a LogicBomb against the monster of the week, a mad mechanoid.]]
--> ''Then where do all the calculators go?''
--> ''They just die.''
* ''Series/SwitchedAtBirth'': {{Discussed}} by Regina and John. He believes there's some afterlife where you can meet your loved ones again, but Regina doesn't, unfortunate as she finds that.
* ''Series/OrangeIsTheNewBlack'': Taystee asserts that when you're dead that's it and ghosts aren't real as Suzanne tries to call up Poussey's spirit in a seance.



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes:
** Calvin ponders this on a number of occasions, wondering what the point of human existence can possibly be if it's just going to end someday. In at least one case he concludes that since everyone is going to die and stay dead forever, there was no reason to abide by any rules, and he decides to [[TheUnfettered lead a life of shameless hedonism]] (which is immediately kiboshed by his parents). [[TheAntiNihilist Hobbes is more accepting of this possibility, pointing out that life is quite wonderful even if it's finite, so we should be grateful.]]
** It's also very vague as to whether Hobbes experiences this [[NoOntologicalInertia when Calvin is not around or not looking at him]]. Evidence exists for both arguments.
* In ''ComicStrip/LifeInHell'', Bongo swats a fly, and then asks Binky what happens after someone dies. Binky responds that people believe all kinds of things, but the reasonable ones believe exactly in this trope, prompting Bongo to apologize to the fly.
[[/folder]]


** Same goes for the Stoics in general, though a few did argue in favor of an immortal soul.
* There was an influential Jewish sect around the time of Jesus, the Sadducees, who did not believe in an afterlife for mortals, and rejected the idea of a resurrection. [[Literature/TheBible The New Testament]] depicts several disputes between them and the growing Christian movement.
** Actually, the Sadducees did believe in a sort of afterlife-they believed in the traditional Jewish concept of Sheol which was basically a gloomy Purgatory-like limbo where the souls of all men, whether good o evil, went after death.
** The Talmud does not handle the Sadducees exactly with silk gloves. The Pharisees and Sadducees were at each others' throats, and the Pharisees eventually won. The Talmud was [[WrittenByTheWinners written by the descendants of Pharisees]]. The Essenes also disagreed with the Sadducees on this point, and hated them more than the Pharisees did. John the Baptist even calls the Sadducees “a brood of vipers”... although the Gospels collectively imply that he liked the Pharisees even less.

to:

** Same goes for the * Stoics in general, general also didn't believe in an afterlife, though a few did argue in favor of an immortal soul.
* There was an influential Jewish sect around the time of Jesus, the Sadducees, who did not believe in an afterlife for mortals, and rejected the idea of a resurrection. [[Literature/TheBible The New Testament]] depicts several disputes between them and the growing Christian movement.
** Actually, the Sadducees did believe in a sort of afterlife-they believed in the traditional Jewish concept of Sheol which was basically a gloomy Purgatory-like limbo where the souls of all men, whether good o evil, went after death.
** The Talmud does not handle the Sadducees exactly with silk gloves. The Pharisees and Sadducees were at each others' throats, and the Pharisees eventually won. The Talmud was [[WrittenByTheWinners written by the descendants of Pharisees]]. The Essenes also disagreed with the Sadducees on this point, and hated them more than the Pharisees did. John the Baptist even calls the Sadducees “a brood of vipers”... although the Gospels collectively imply that he liked the Pharisees even less.
soul.


* The inhabitants of [[{{Uberwald}} Innistrad]] in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' believe in something called the Blessed Sleep, which is essentially this. The Blessed Sleep is actually considered the best possible outcome for anyone who dies, since the alternative is becoming a ghost, vampire, ghost, or any other kind of undead horror.

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* The inhabitants of [[{{Uberwald}} Innistrad]] in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' believe in something called the Blessed Sleep, which is essentially this. The Blessed Sleep is actually considered the best possible outcome for anyone who dies, since the alternative is becoming a ghost, vampire, ghost, vampire or any other kind of undead horror.


* The inhabitants of [[Uberwald Innistrad]] in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' believe in something called the Blessed Sleep, which is essentially this. The Blessed Sleep is actually considered the best possible outcome for anyone who dies, since the alternative is becoming a ghost, vampire, ghost, or any other kind of undead horror.

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* The inhabitants of [[Uberwald [[{{Uberwald}} Innistrad]] in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' believe in something called the Blessed Sleep, which is essentially this. The Blessed Sleep is actually considered the best possible outcome for anyone who dies, since the alternative is becoming a ghost, vampire, ghost, or any other kind of undead horror.

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* The inhabitants of [[Uberwald Innistrad]] in ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' believe in something called the Blessed Sleep, which is essentially this. The Blessed Sleep is actually considered the best possible outcome for anyone who dies, since the alternative is becoming a ghost, vampire, ghost, or any other kind of undead horror.


* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': Michael completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at first and then has the equivalent of a mid-life crisis over it.

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* ''Series/TheGoodPlace'': Averted, as much of the series takes place in an explicit afterlife divided between the {{heaven}}ly Good Place and the {{hell}}ish Bad Place. Thus, it's more of a discussed trope.
**
Michael (an immortal and near-omniscient supernatural being as old as time itself) completely freaks out at the idea he might cease to exist someday, reducing him to a near-catatonia at first and then has the equivalent of having a mid-life crisis HollywoodMidlifeCrisis over it. It's all PlayedForLaughs.
** Simone, being a doctor in neuroscience, seems to believe this is what happens after death. When she [[spoiler:dies and goes into the afterlife as one of the four subjects chosen for a new Fake Good Place experiment, she refuses to believe anything is real and believes everyone and everything she's seeing is just an intense DyingDream]]. Michael mentions having met a few people that believed the same; they usually began to realize the afterlife was real after [[spoiler:a good few torture sessions]].

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* ''Series/OrangeIsTheNewBlack'': Taystee asserts that when you're dead that's it and ghosts aren't real as Suzanne tries to call up Poussey's spirit in a seance.


* ''Manga/DragonBall''

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* ''Manga/DragonBall''''Franchise/DragonBall'':



** Android 16 is fully mechanical, so when Cell destroyed him, he had no soul to be restored.

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** Android 16 is fully mechanical, so when Cell destroyed him, him in ''Anime/DragonBallZ'''s Cell arc, he had no soul to be restored.

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