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[[folder:Comic Books]]
* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': The Sangtee Empire covers at least two star systems and have shipping lanes through space, however interstellar travel is still a large undertaking for them especially to places outside the Empire's borders.
[[/folder]]


[[folder: Western Animation ]]

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[[folder: Western Animation ]][[folder:Western Animation]]

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* Averted in the ''Literature/TheLordsOfCreation'' series by Creator/SMStirling. Space travel and colonisation is so expensive only the superpowers can afford it, using up the resources [[AlternateHistory that would otherwise be spent on the East/West arms race or Third World conflict.]]


SisterTrope of CasualInterstellarTravel. Sometimes there's minimum range limitation that makes only interstellar transit easy (say, wormholes), sometimes interstellar travel is still sublight or very difficult, but this is easy. At the other end of the spectrum, see InterplanetaryVoyage and GenerationShips.

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SisterTrope of CasualInterstellarTravel. Sometimes there's minimum range limitation that makes only interstellar transit easy (say, wormholes), sometimes interstellar travel is still sublight or very difficult, but this is easy. At the other end of the spectrum, see InterplanetaryVoyage (where interplanetary travel is treated as so difficult that it takes up the whole story) and GenerationShips.

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* Due to space itself working differently in ''{{Literature/Larklight}}'' (SpaceIsAnOcean and also breathable for short periods) and faster-than-light speed a matter of mixing the right chemicals together in the engine room, travel across the solar system is not significantly more difficult from travel across the sea in finest SpaceOpera form.



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[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]
* Subtle examples can be found in the Franchise/{{Gundam}} series, which likes to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point Lagrange points]] around the Earth for its colonies, with the furthest ones at the L2 point (where the Principality of Zeon is located) being past lunar orbit. The L3 point (where ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' begins for example) is on the opposite side from the moon at any given time. Travel between these points, or from one to the Earth or the moon, takes a few days at most. Going out past the immediate area of lunar orbit, however, takes several months.
** In the UC timeline, there exist colonies out at Jupiter, for gas-mining purposes. Travel out to the Jovian colonies is therefore fairly common and not much of a big deal, though it does take about six months on average to make the trip.

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[[folder: Anime [[folder:Anime and Manga ]]
* Subtle examples can be found in the Franchise/{{Gundam}} series, which likes to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point Lagrange points]] around the Earth for its colonies, with the furthest ones at the L2 point (where the Principality of Zeon is located) being past lunar orbit. The L3 point (where ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' begins for example) is on the opposite side from the moon at any given time. Travel between these points, or from one to the Earth or the moon, takes a few days at most. Going out past the immediate area of lunar orbit, however, takes several months.
** In the UC timeline, there exist colonies out at Jupiter, for gas-mining purposes. Travel out to the Jovian colonies is therefore fairly common and not much of a big deal, though it does take about six months on average to make the trip.
Manga]]



* ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' series is a bit vague about its cosmology but it seems that "dimension", "world", and "planet" mean the same thing in the setting. Spells like Dimensional Transfer are readily available to {{Magitek}} mages, and in ''Manga/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaViVid'', the heroes take a shuttle to another planet like one would take a bus to another town.



* Subtle examples can be found in the ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' series, which likes to use [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point Lagrange points]] around the Earth for its colonies, with the furthest ones at the L2 point (where the Principality of Zeon is located) being past lunar orbit. The L3 point (where ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' begins for example) is on the opposite side from the moon at any given time. Travel between these points, or from one to the Earth or the moon, takes a few days at most. Going out past the immediate area of lunar orbit, however, takes several months.
** In the UC timeline, there exist colonies out at Jupiter, for gas-mining purposes. Travel out to the Jovian colonies is therefore fairly common and not much of a big deal, though it does take about six months on average to make the trip.
* ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' series is a bit vague about its cosmology but it seems that "dimension", "world", and "planet" mean the same thing in the setting. Spells like Dimensional Transfer are readily available to {{Magitek}} mages, and in ''Manga/MagicalGirlLyricalNanohaViVid'', the heroes take a shuttle to another planet like one would take a bus to another town.



[[folder: Fan Works ]]

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[[folder: Fan Works ]][[folder:Fan Works]]



[[folder: Literature ]]

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[[folder: Literature ]][[folder:Film Live-Action]]
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' has the eponymous company launching several spacecraft a day, including one to Titan, and is in no way implied to be the only company in the business.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
* ''Literature/AlienInASmallTown:'' A trip to Mars on a passenger ship takes weeks, and doesn't seem terribly expensive.
* Averted in ''The Children's Crusade'' by Creator/RobertReed. The three superpowers attempt manned landings on Mars - all of which fail. The American ship manages to reach Mars, but finds their lander inoperative - they leave back for Earth, while systems on the ship fail and kill 4 of the 7 crew. The European Union launches two ships. One of the landers explodes on entry, and the other lands - but is bogged down in extremely fine Martian dust, causing it to sit at an odd angle, making it impossible to lift off again, stranding the crew on the surface. The Chinese build an elaborate, highly efficient ship powered by a fusion rocket, which explodes from impurities in its reaction chamber as it leaves Earth's orbit.
* Creator/RobertAHeinlein
** His "Future History" has regular interplanetary travel available to the majority of humanity, but also ''repeatedly'' details how much work it took to make it Casual - see the [[Quotes/CasualInterplanetaryTravel quotes page]].
** In Heinlein's juvenile ''Literature/{{The Rolling Stones}}'', buying a spaceship capable of flying from the Moon to the Asteroid Belt is roughly equivalent to buying a sailing vessel big enough for a family to go on an ocean voyage.



* Averted in ''The Childrens Crusade'' by Creator/RobertReed. The three superpowers attempt manned landings on Mars - all of which fail. The American ship manages to reach Mars, but finds their lander inoperative - they leave back for Earth, while systems on the ship fail and kill 4 of the 7 crew. The European Union launches two ships. One of the landers explodes on entry, and the other lands - but is bogged down in extremely fine Martian dust, causing it to sit at an odd angle, making it impossible to lift off again, stranding the crew on the surface. The Chinese build an elaborate, highly efficient ship powered by a fusion rocket, which explodes from impurities in its reaction chamber as it leaves Earth's orbit.
* Averted in the more hard sci-fi novels of Creator/StephenBaxter, particularly ''{{Literature/Voyage}}''.



* Creator/RobertAHeinlein
** His "Future History" has regular interplanetary travel available to the majority of humanity, but also ''repeatedly'' details how much work it took to make it Casual - see the [[Quotes/CasualInterplanetaryTravel quotes page]].
* In Heinlein's juvenile ''Literature/{{The Rolling Stones}}'', buying a spaceship capable of flying from the Moon to the Asteroid Belt is roughly equivalent to buying a sailing vessel big enough for a family to go on an ocean voyage.
* ''Literature/AlienInASmallTown:'' A trip to Mars on a passenger ship takes weeks, and doesn't seem terribly expensive.

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* Creator/RobertAHeinlein
** His "Future History" has regular interplanetary travel available to
Averted in the majority more hard sci-fi novels of humanity, but also ''repeatedly'' details how much work it took to make it Casual - see the [[Quotes/CasualInterplanetaryTravel quotes page]].
* In Heinlein's juvenile ''Literature/{{The Rolling Stones}}'', buying a spaceship capable of flying from the Moon to the Asteroid Belt is roughly equivalent to buying a sailing vessel big enough for a family to go on an ocean voyage.
* ''Literature/AlienInASmallTown:'' A trip to Mars on a passenger ship takes weeks, and doesn't seem terribly expensive.
Creator/StephenBaxter, particularly ''{{Literature/Voyage}}''.



[[folder: Live Action Film ]]
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' has the eponymous company launching several spacecraft a day, including one to Titan, and is in no way implied to get the only company in the business.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]

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[[folder: Live Action Film ]]
[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Film/{{Gattaca}}'' has the eponymous company launching several spacecraft a day, including one to Titan, and is in no way implied to get the only company ''Series/TheExpanse'' takes place in the business.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action TV ]]
2300s, where the Epstein drive, a fusion drive capable of constant thrust have enabled the colonization of the Solar System. A single person can have their own mining ship, most trips take a couple weeks at most, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.



* In the Canadian show ''Series/{{Starhunter}}'', interplanetary travel is semi-realistic but casual; push on the gas and you go faster, but it does take a couple of days to get from the moons of Jupiter to Mars. Interstellar travel exists (via {{Hyperspace}}), but is very new, cutting edge, rare, and dangerous.
* The Franchise/StargateVerse has various shuttle-craft (Al'kesh, Puddle-Jumpers, etc) that make it a breeze to fly from a planet's surface to say, the nearby moon. Not that ''every'' galactic Joe can own one, since they're mostly in the hands of organized militaries, empires, and crime syndicates, but it's not unheard of for a particularly enterprising individual to have their own private spacecraft.
** For Earth specifically this is averted for several seasons until we have time to build our own ships, despite long since having become an interstellar power due to the SG teams and the stargates enabling CasualInterstellarTravel.



* ''Series/TheExpanse'' takes place in the 2300s, where the Epstein drive, a fusion drive capable of constant thrust have enabled the colonization of the Solar System. A single person can have their own mining ship, most trips take a couple weeks at most, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.

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* ''Series/TheExpanse'' takes place The Franchise/StargateVerse has various shuttle-craft (Al'kesh, Puddle-Jumpers, etc.) that make it a breeze to fly from a planet's surface to say, the nearby moon. Not that ''every'' galactic Joe can own one, since they're mostly in the 2300s, where the Epstein drive, a fusion drive capable hands of constant thrust have enabled the colonization organized militaries, empires, and crime syndicates, but it's not unheard of the Solar System. A single person can for a particularly enterprising individual to have their own mining ship, most trips private spacecraft.
** For Earth specifically this is averted for several seasons until we have time to build our own ships, despite long since having become an interstellar power due to the SG teams and the stargates enabling CasualInterstellarTravel.
* In the Canadian show ''Series/{{Starhunter}}'', interplanetary travel is semi-realistic but casual; push on the gas and you go faster, but it does
take a couple weeks at most, of days to get from the moons of Jupiter to Mars. Interstellar travel exists (via {{Hyperspace}}), but is very new, cutting edge, rare, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.dangerous.



[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' travel within a star system takes a couple days, a week at most. While interstellar requires at least one week in jump plus the time to travel to/from the edge of both systems.

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[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]
* In ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' travel within a star system takes a couple days, a week at most. While interstellar requires at least one week in jump plus the time to travel to/from the edge of both systems.
[[folder:Tabletop Games]]



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' travel within a star system takes a couple days, a week at most. While interstellar requires at least one week in jump plus the time to travel to/from the edge of both systems.



[[folder: Video Games ]]

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[[folder: Video Games ]][[folder:Video Games]]


* In Creator/KimStanleyRobinson's ''[[TwentyThreeTwelve 2312]]'', a trip from Mercury to Pluto via terrarium (hollowed-out asteroids containing largely self-sufficient biospheres) is measured in weeks. Relatively fast, but still leading some of those travelling to get temp jobs for the duration.

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* In Creator/KimStanleyRobinson's ''[[TwentyThreeTwelve 2312]]'', ''Literature/TwentyThreeTwelve'', a trip from Mercury to Pluto via terrarium (hollowed-out asteroids containing largely self-sufficient biospheres) is measured in weeks. Relatively fast, but still leading some of those travelling to get temp jobs for the duration.


* In Creator/KimStanleyRobinson's ''2312'', a trip from Mercury to Pluto via terrarium (hollowed-out asteroids containing largely self-sufficient biospheres) is measured in weeks. Relatively fast, but still leading some of those travelling to get temp jobs for the duration.

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* In Creator/KimStanleyRobinson's ''2312'', ''[[TwentyThreeTwelve 2312]]'', a trip from Mercury to Pluto via terrarium (hollowed-out asteroids containing largely self-sufficient biospheres) is measured in weeks. Relatively fast, but still leading some of those travelling to get temp jobs for the duration.


-->--J.E. Volonte

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-->--J.-->-- J.E. Volonte

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* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's "Future History" has regular interplanetary travel available to the majority of humanity, but also ''repeatedly'' details how much work it took to make it Casual - see the [[Quotes/CasualInterplanetaryTravel quotes page]].
* In Heinlein's juvenile "Literature/{{The Rolling Stones}}" buying a spaceship capable of flying from the Moon to the Asteroid Belt is roughly equivalent to buying a sailing vessel big enough for a family to go on an ocean voyage.

to:

* Creator/RobertAHeinlein's Creator/RobertAHeinlein
** His
"Future History" has regular interplanetary travel available to the majority of humanity, but also ''repeatedly'' details how much work it took to make it Casual - see the [[Quotes/CasualInterplanetaryTravel quotes page]].
* In Heinlein's juvenile "Literature/{{The ''Literature/{{The Rolling Stones}}" Stones}}'', buying a spaceship capable of flying from the Moon to the Asteroid Belt is roughly equivalent to buying a sailing vessel big enough for a family to go on an ocean voyage.
voyage.



































In context, it's not that bad; historically, ChristopherColumbus' ''first'' voyage [[https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/14gdcm/how_much_in_modern_dollars_did_it_cost_for/ cost less than two million]] - and [[Creator/RobertAHeinlein once you reach orbit]], [[http://www.asimovs.com/_issue_0603/Thougthexperiments.shtml you're halfway to anywhere]]. Once the infrastructure was in place, the original American immigrants made their journeys on ''personal funds'' - so there's no reason that the phenomenon shouldn't repeat itself by the 2050's so long as we get a "space Mayflower" by the 2020's. [[IWantMyJetpack Better get to work on that.]]

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In context, it's not that bad; historically, ChristopherColumbus' UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus' ''first'' voyage [[https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/14gdcm/how_much_in_modern_dollars_did_it_cost_for/ cost less than two million]] - and [[Creator/RobertAHeinlein once you reach orbit]], [[http://www.asimovs.com/_issue_0603/Thougthexperiments.shtml you're halfway to anywhere]]. Once the infrastructure was in place, the original American immigrants made their journeys on ''personal funds'' - so there's no reason that the phenomenon shouldn't repeat itself by the 2050's so long as we get a "space Mayflower" by the 2020's. [[IWantMyJetpack Better get to work on that.]]


* Averted in ''The Childrens Crusade'' by RobertReed. The three superpowers attempt manned landings on Mars - all of which fail. The American ship manages to reach Mars, but finds their lander inoperative - they leave back for Earth, while systems on the ship fail and kill 4 of the 7 crew. The European Union launches two ships. One of the landers explodes on entry, and the other lands - but is bogged down in extremely fine Martian dust, causing it to sit at an odd angle, making it impossible to lift off again, stranding the crew on the surface. The Chinese build an elaborate, highly efficient ship powered by a fusion rocket, which explodes from impurities in its reaction chamber as it leaves Earth's orbit.
* Averted in the more hard sci-fi novels of StephenBaxter, particularly ''{{Literature/Voyage}}''.

to:

* Averted in ''The Childrens Crusade'' by RobertReed.Creator/RobertReed. The three superpowers attempt manned landings on Mars - all of which fail. The American ship manages to reach Mars, but finds their lander inoperative - they leave back for Earth, while systems on the ship fail and kill 4 of the 7 crew. The European Union launches two ships. One of the landers explodes on entry, and the other lands - but is bogged down in extremely fine Martian dust, causing it to sit at an odd angle, making it impossible to lift off again, stranding the crew on the surface. The Chinese build an elaborate, highly efficient ship powered by a fusion rocket, which explodes from impurities in its reaction chamber as it leaves Earth's orbit.
* Averted in the more hard sci-fi novels of StephenBaxter, Creator/StephenBaxter, particularly ''{{Literature/Voyage}}''.


* Series/TheExpanse takes place a couple hundred years in the future, where fusion drives capable of constant thrust have enabled the colonization of the Solar System. A single person can have their own mining ship, most trips take a couple weeks at most, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.

to:

* Series/TheExpanse ''Series/TheExpanse'' takes place a couple hundred years in the future, 2300s, where the Epstein drive, a fusion drives drive capable of constant thrust have enabled the colonization of the Solar System. A single person can have their own mining ship, most trips take a couple weeks at most, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.



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* Series/TheExpanse takes place a couple hundred years in the future, where fusion drives capable of constant thrust have enabled the colonization of the Solar System. A single person can have their own mining ship, most trips take a couple weeks at most, and there are regular passenger services between population centers.

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