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* W.W. Denslow's illustrations for ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' show a dark-haired Dorothy, while John R. Neill's later illustrations showed Dorothy as a blonde. In a case of FirstInstallmentWins, the [[Film/TheWizardOfOz Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film]] followed the Denslow illustrations, and AdaptationDisplacement did the rest.


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** It was also apparently Tenniel's choice to draw the Lion and the Unicorn in ''ThroughTheLookingGlass'' as caricatures of Gladstone and Disraeli.

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** It was also apparently Tenniel's choice to draw the Lion and the Unicorn in ''ThroughTheLookingGlass'' ''Literature/ThroughTheLookingGlass'' as caricatures of Gladstone and Disraeli.


* For many TabletopGame/DarkSun players, Brom provided the definative look for Athas with his novel and sourcebook covers. When the Fourth Edition campaign guide came out, many called for WizardsOfTheCoast to hire him for the cover. They didn't.

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* For many TabletopGame/DarkSun players, Brom provided the definative definitive look for Athas with his novel and sourcebook covers. When the Fourth Edition campaign guide came out, many called for WizardsOfTheCoast Creator/WizardsOfTheCoast to hire him for the cover. They didn't.



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* ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' had this before [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings the films]] did, with the illustrations by John Howe and Alan Lee being the most prevalent visual depiction of the story. Peter Jackson brought both of them on as concept artists for these and ''Film/TheHobbit'' trilogy, and such was their influence that some designs were put in unaltered and illustrations recreated as actual shots.



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* ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents'' is illustrated by Brett Helquist in a very distinctive style which has become strongly associated with the books and the appearance of the characters.


* Paul Kidby's illustrations to ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', adding such details as Ponder's "Actually I Am A Rocket Wizard" FunTShirt, now as ubiquitous to the character as the robe that looks like an old-fashioned anorak (which ''is'' in the text). {{Defictionalisation}} has occured.
* RudyardKipling's illustrations to the ''JustSoStories'' - which are left out entirely or replaced with new ones in many editions - contain quite a bit of additional information in the accompanying explanations, for instance the names of some characters that are not named in-story (e. g. the Rhinoceros and the Parsee are called Strorks and Pestonjee Bomonjee, respectively) or what happened afterwards (e. g. the Whale and the little 'Stute Fish became good friends again after the Whale got over his temper). One of the illustrations of ''The Coming of the Armadilloes'' tells an entirely unconnected story of an expedition to the mouths of the Amazon in the 16th or 17th century.

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* Paul Kidby's illustrations to ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', adding such details as Ponder's "Actually I Am A Rocket Wizard" FunTShirt, now as ubiquitous to the character as the robe that looks like an old-fashioned anorak (which ''is'' in the text). {{Defictionalisation}} has occured.
occurred.
* RudyardKipling's Creator/RudyardKipling's illustrations to the ''JustSoStories'' - which are left out entirely or replaced with new ones in many editions - contain quite a bit of additional information in the accompanying explanations, for instance the names of some characters that are not named in-story (e. g. the Rhinoceros and the Parsee are called Strorks and Pestonjee Bomonjee, respectively) or what happened afterwards (e. g. the Whale and the little 'Stute Fish became good friends again after the Whale got over his temper). One of the illustrations of ''The Coming of the Armadilloes'' tells an entirely unconnected story of an expedition to the mouths of the Amazon in the 16th or 17th century.



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* ''Literature/PanTadeusz'' is inseparably associated with the illustrations by Michał Elwiro Andriolli from the 1882 edition.


* The original illustrations from ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'''s magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered.

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* The original illustrations from ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'''s magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered. Conan generally wore whatever attire was appropriate for the climate and culture he was in at the moment, so there were a few instances where he actually did wear a loincloth, but certainly not as much as the illustrations would have you believe.


* ''ThePolarExpress'' is famous for its gorgeous, full-page illustrations, most of which were reproduced in TheFilmOfTheBook (it was probably the point of making a movie to begin with).

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* ''ThePolarExpress'' ''Literature/ThePolarExpress'' is famous for its gorgeous, full-page illustrations, most of which were reproduced in TheFilmOfTheBook (it was probably the point of making a movie to begin with).


* Literature/CiaphasCain is always depicted in illustrations carrying a Bolt Pistol, despite using a Laspistol in the books. This is apparently deliberate, to reflect the fact that the images are meant to be ridiculously over-the-top propaganda posters. One later book does mention that he has a Bolt Pistol to brandish dramatically for portrait sittings and photo ops, but he still almost always uses his trusty Laspistol in actual combat.

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* Literature/CiaphasCain is always depicted in illustrations carrying a Bolt Pistol, despite using a Laspistol in the books. This is apparently deliberate, to reflect the fact that the images are meant to be ridiculously over-the-top propaganda posters. One later book does mention that he has a Bolt Pistol to brandish dramatically for portrait sittings and photo ops, but he still almost always uses his trusty Laspistol in actual combat.combat (he sometimes has the chance to take something bigger, but always keeps the laspistol due to being a better shot with it. Considering he's taken out [[EliteMook purestrain genestealers]] and [[KingMook ork warlords]] with the weakest standard weapon in the setting, you kind of see his point).


* For many DarkSun players, Brom provided the definative look for Athas with his novel and sourcebook covers. When the Fourth Edition campaign guide came out, many called for WizardsOfTheCoast to hire him for the cover. They didn't.

to:

* For many DarkSun TabletopGame/DarkSun players, Brom provided the definative look for Athas with his novel and sourcebook covers. When the Fourth Edition campaign guide came out, many called for WizardsOfTheCoast to hire him for the cover. They didn't.


* The original illustrations from ''Literature/ConanTheBarbarian'''s magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered.

to:

* The original illustrations from ''Literature/ConanTheBarbarian'''s ''Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian'''s magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered.


* Literature/CiaphasCain is always depicted in illustrations carrying a Bolt Pistol, despite using a Laspistol in the books. This is apparently deliberate, to reflect the fact that the images are meant to be ridiculously over-the-top propaganda posters.

to:

* Literature/CiaphasCain is always depicted in illustrations carrying a Bolt Pistol, despite using a Laspistol in the books. This is apparently deliberate, to reflect the fact that the images are meant to be ridiculously over-the-top propaganda posters. One later book does mention that he has a Bolt Pistol to brandish dramatically for portrait sittings and photo ops, but he still almost always uses his trusty Laspistol in actual combat.


* The original illustrations from ConanTheBarbarian's magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered.

to:

* The original illustrations from ConanTheBarbarian's ''Literature/ConanTheBarbarian'''s magazine serialization depict him as the now-stereotypical LoinCloth-clad brute, but in the actual text what Conan felt to be one of the advantages of his stature was the ability to wear very heavy armor (usually chainmail over leather) while remaining agile and unencumbered.

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