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--> '''Murdoch:''' They're blinking and they're beeping and they're flashing... and they're FLASHING and they're BEEPING. I can't stand it anymore! WHY DOESN'T SOMEBODY STOP THEM?!...

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--> '''Murdoch:''' They're blinking and they're beeping and they're flashing... and they're FLASHING and they're BEEPING. I can't stand it anymore! WHY DOESN'T SOMEBODY STOP THEM?!...THEM?!
** It doesn't help that [[CowTools no-one knows what they actually do]].
-->'''Lieutenant Pervis:''' Sir, these lights keep blinking out of sequence. What should we do about it, sir?
-->'''Commander Murdoch:''' Get them to blink ''in'' sequence!

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* ''Series/OutOfThisWorld1962'''s "[[Recap/OutOfThisWorldLittleLostRobot Little Lost Robot]]": The gallery, from where the characters conduct the [[BluffTheImpostor experiment]], has [[ComputerEqualsTapedrive tape reels]], buttons and levers, as well as [[BeepingComputers whirring and flashing lights]], which shows how complicated the machinery is in Hyperbase 7.


** Another Looney Tunes example appears in the WesternAnimation/BugsBunny short "Hare Lift", which features a massive new plane with this kind of control panel.

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** Another Looney Tunes example appears in the WesternAnimation/BugsBunny short "Hare Lift", "WesternAnimation/HareLift", which features a massive new plane with this kind of control panel.


* In ''ComicBook/TheLegendOfWonderWoman2016'' the Holliday Girls are amazed that Diana can control the aircraft they "borrow" due to the overwhelming number of buttons and switches in the cockpit.

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* ''Franchise/WonderWoman'':
** ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': [[ComicBook/{{Cheetah}} Sebastian Ballesteros]]'s nuclear silo inspired base has every surface save the floor covered in buttons, screens or both.
**
In ''ComicBook/TheLegendOfWonderWoman2016'' the Holliday Girls are amazed that Diana can control the aircraft they "borrow" due to the overwhelming number of buttons and switches in the cockpit.

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* ''[[VideoGame/RockBand Rock Band 3]]'''s Fender Mustang Pro Guitar controller has 102 buttons on its neck, simulating 6 strings across 17 frets.


-->'''Ogelthorpe:''' Quit pushing the buttons!
-->'''Shake:''' This whole ships a bunch of buttons!

to:

-->'''Ogelthorpe:''' Quit pushing the buttons!
-->'''Shake:'''
buttons!\\
'''Shake:'''
This whole ships ship's a bunch of buttons!


This is TruthInTelevision. RealLife aircraft, spacecraft, power stations, trains and so on have loads and loads of buttons - many of which are only used if one particular component (out of thousands) is misbehaving. The cockpit of the Space Shuttle, for example, has buttons covering every available surface (even the ceiling!). More advanced and reliable computing power has allowed designers to simplify control panels; the 'Glass Cockpit' with Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS) screen, for instance, is pretty much standard kit on most airliners. Even in an era when most or all functions ''can'' be routed through a single simple interface, having a cockpit full of hard-wired controls reduces the chances of a single circuit failure rendering an entire craft uncontrollable. The armada of buttons are on standby just in case you have to take full manual control of the craft, or make it do something outside the normal operational regime - say, when you suddenly need to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549 land an airliner on a river]]. (In a delightful fulfillment of the trope, the Airbus A320 actually ''does'' have a button for precisely that situation; it seals several of the aircraft's external openings, to help slow the rate at which the fuselage floods and sinks. In the case of Flight 1549, though, it wasn't actually used, nor would it have helped, since the impact with the water tore holes much larger than those the "ditch switch" would have sealed. But the switch was ''there'', and that's the point.)

Another design consideration underlies the trope: that of haptic feedback. The primary strength of a touchscreen interface is its ease of discoverability and configuration: instead of a bunch of single-purpose buttons and switches and so forth, you can have just a single touchscreen with modes providing all those controls and more, and the platform lends itself well to helping a novice user find her way around the interface. The trouble is, those controls are totally refractory to muscle memory and touch feedback, because no matter what control inputs you're making, what you are actually ''doing'' is wiggling your fingertips around on a sheet of glass. This makes it almost impossible to perform those control inputs without looking at what you're doing, -- a minor concern when you're flipping between apps on your iPad, but a potentially life-threatening requirement when you can't afford to divide your attention from trying to fly an aircraft or spacecraft back out of trouble.

to:

This is TruthInTelevision. RealLife aircraft, spacecraft, power stations, trains and so on have loads and loads of buttons - many of which are only used if one particular component (out of thousands) is misbehaving. The cockpit of the Space Shuttle, for example, has buttons covering every available surface (even the ceiling!). More advanced and reliable computing power has allowed designers to simplify control panels; the 'Glass Cockpit' with Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS) screen, for instance, is pretty much standard kit on most airliners. Even in an era when most or all functions ''can'' be routed through a single simple interface, having a cockpit full of hard-wired controls reduces the chances of a single circuit failure rendering an entire craft uncontrollable. The armada of buttons are on standby just in case you have to take full manual control of the craft, or make it do something outside the normal operational regime - say, when you suddenly need to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549 land an airliner on a river]]. (In a delightful fulfillment of the trope, the Airbus A320 actually ''does'' have a button for precisely that situation; it seals several of the aircraft's external openings, to help slow the rate at which the fuselage floods and sinks. In the case of Flight 1549, though, it wasn't actually used, nor would it have helped, since the impact with the water tore holes much larger than those the "ditch switch" would have sealed. But the switch was ''there'', and that's the point.)

Another design consideration underlies the trope: that of haptic feedback. The primary strength of a touchscreen interface is its ease of discoverability and configuration: instead of a bunch of single-purpose buttons and switches and so forth, you can have just a single touchscreen with modes providing all those controls and more, and the platform lends itself well to helping a novice user find her way around the interface. The trouble is, those controls are totally refractory to muscle memory and touch feedback, because no matter what control inputs you're making, what you are actually ''doing'' is wiggling your fingertips around on a sheet of glass. This makes it almost impossible to perform those control inputs without looking at what you're doing, -- doing a minor concern when you're flipping between apps on your iPad, but a potentially life-threatening requirement when you can't afford to divide your attention from trying to fly an aircraft or spacecraft back out of trouble.






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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



*** This also happened very early on in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction The Edge of Destruction]]''. A plot relevant button had to be labeled for the actors to interact with, and the crude felt-tip label [[https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fast_return_9567.png made it onscreen]].
** In the serial ''Day of the Daleks'' the women 'manning' the consoles in the Controller's headquarters are clearly just sliding their hands aimlessly over those same consoles. Perhaps it's meant to be a touch-sensitive interface, but how can they tell what they're doing without looking at the panels?
** TheAestheticsOfTechnology is invoked in the [[AppliedPhlebotinum Sonic Screwdriver]] which has had very few buttons over the course of the show's run but lots of functionality (much of it from the newer series). The latest version has a thumb slide and specifically operates by [[ContextSensitiveButton reading the user's thoughts and extracting a relevant function]].

to:

*** This also happened very early on in ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction "The Edge of Destruction]]''.Destruction"]]. A plot relevant button had to be labeled for the actors to interact with, and the crude felt-tip label [[https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/fast_return_9567.png made it onscreen]].
** In the serial ''Day [[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E1DayOfTheDaleks "Day of the Daleks'' Daleks"]], the women 'manning' "manning" the consoles in the Controller's headquarters are clearly just sliding their hands aimlessly over those same consoles. Perhaps it's meant to be a touch-sensitive interface, but how can they tell what they're doing without looking at the panels?
** TheAestheticsOfTechnology is invoked in the [[AppliedPhlebotinum Sonic Screwdriver]] sonic screwdriver]], which has had very few buttons over the course of the show's run but lots of functionality (much of it from the newer series). The latest version has a thumb slide and specifically operates by [[ContextSensitiveButton reading the user's thoughts and extracting a relevant function]].



** If the dramatisation of the early days of the franchise ''Film/AnAdventureInSpaceAndTime'' is accurate this was in effect from the very start of the show. Creator/WilliamHartnell insisting that the same controls were used for the same Tardis function successfully arguing with the producers that it would violate viewers suspension of disbelief if he used the same control to operate the door one week and activate the viewscreen the next.

to:

** If the dramatisation of the early days of the franchise ''Film/AnAdventureInSpaceAndTime'' is accurate accurate, this was in effect from the very start of the show. Creator/WilliamHartnell insisting that the same controls were used for the same Tardis function TARDIS function, successfully arguing with the producers that it would violate viewers suspension of disbelief if he used the same control to operate the door one week and activate the viewscreen the next.



* In ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', ''Serenity's'' cockpit doesn't have massive amounts of buttons, but it does have a large number of them on the consoles and especially on the cockpit's ceiling.
** Alan Tudyk, who played the ship's pilot Wash, said that every time he was directed to do something with the ship, he would always flip three switches above him as a sort of "start-up sequence".
* In ''Series/KnightRider'', K.I.T.T's control panel had a lot more buttons than were actually used. The handful that were used, like Turbo Boost and Eject R, were marked clearly, but most of them had obscure labels along the lines of [=7DLX=], [=8PL1=], or [=P AUX=].
-->'''Devon:''' Welcome on board the Knight 2000.\\
'''Michael:''' Thank you. What's all this? ''(gestures at dashboard)'' Looks like [[Franchise/StarWars Darth Vader]]'s bathroom.
* Inverted in ''Series/RedDwarf'' with Holly's ultra-sophisticated, universe traveling, faster-than-light "Holly Hop Drive". It only had two buttons a green one marked "start" and a red one marked "stop", you pressed the green one to start it...
-->'''Holly:''' ...and you can work out the rest of the controls yourself.
** In ''Back in the Red'', Kryten manages to sway Rimmer into coming with them by promising him his own seat in the cockpit with as many as five buttons at his command.



* The vehicles in ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad'' were controlled by many flashing unlabelled buttons pushed by untrained teenagers (and on one occasion a high school lunchlady) - even weirder considering the said vehicles were actually [[ItRunsOnNonsenseoleum antivirus software.]]
* In ''Series/{{The Twilight Zone|1959}}'' original series, any time a computer was used, it would have not only numerous buttons, but also panels full of lights that were not labeled, which would blink, usually in a pattern. This is a simultaneously lazy and clever take on contemporaneous ''actual'' computers, which themselves had panels full of lights which ''were'' labeled, and which would blink, usually in a pattern. Since the lights and their labels had meaning only for those few closely familiar with the arcana of a particular machine's operation, the TV versions just showed big panels full of blinking lights, since that's all a layman would notice in any case.



* In ''Series/{{The Twilight Zone|1959}}'' original series, any time a computer was used, it would have not only numerous buttons, but also panels full of lights that were not labeled, which would blink, usually in a pattern. This is a simultaneously lazy and clever take on contemporaneous ''actual'' computers, which themselves had panels full of lights which ''were'' labeled, and which would blink, usually in a pattern. Since the lights and their labels had meaning only for those few closely familiar with the arcana of a particular machine's operation, the TV versions just showed big panels full of blinking lights, since that's all a layman would notice in any case.
* In ''Series/{{Firefly}}'', ''Serenity's'' cockpit doesn't have massive amounts of buttons, but it does have a large number of them on the consoles and especially on the cockpit's ceiling.
** Alan Tudyk, who played the ship's pilot Wash, said that every time he was directed to do something with the ship, he would always flip three switches above him as a sort of "start-up sequence".
* Inverted in ''Series/RedDwarf'' with Holly's ultra-sophisticated, universe traveling, faster-than-light "Holly Hop Drive". It only had two buttons a green one marked "start" and a red one marked "stop", you pressed the green one to start it...
-->'''Holly:''' ...and you can work out the rest of the controls yourself.
** In ''Back in the Red'', Kryten manages to sway Rimmer into coming with them by promising him his own seat in the cockpit with as many as five buttons at his command.
* The vehicles in ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad'' were controlled by many flashing unlabelled buttons pushed by untrained teenagers (and on one occasion a high school lunchlady) - even weirder considering the said vehicles were actually [[ItRunsOnNonsenseoleum antivirus software.]]
* In ''Series/KnightRider'', K.I.T.T's control panel had a lot more buttons than were actually used. The handful that were used, like Turbo Boost and Eject R, were marked clearly, but most of them had obscure labels along the lines of [=7DLX=], [=8PL1=], or [=P AUX=].
-->'''Devon:''' Welcome on board the Knight 2000.
-->'''Michael:''' Thank you. What's all this? ''(gestures at dashboard)'' Looks like [[Franchise/StarWars Darth Vader]]'s bathroom.

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** In another episode of ''Voyager'', the Doctor ends up on a Starfleet ship where the only other crew is another EMH who's never even seen bridge controls. At one point, the Doctor tries to get the other EMH to take over tactical while he pilots the ship. HilarityEnsues.
--->'''Doctor:''' What are you waiting for? Shoot! Shoot!\\
'''EMH-2:''' [[LampshadeHanging There are so many controls]] ...\\
'''Doctor:''' Find the one that says "fire" and push it!


* The [[CoolCar Delorean]] TimeMachine in ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' films has three rows of buttons along the roof of the car (well, the roof that isn't also part of the gull-wing doors) and more than a few on the board behind the seats. They're never touched in the movies, though the Delorean model in the [[VideoGame/BackToTheFuture video game]] labels the buttons such things as "Flux front", "Coolsys 1", and "Alt".

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* The [[CoolCar Delorean]] TimeMachine in ''Franchise/BackToTheFuture'' films has three rows of buttons along the roof of the car (well, the roof that isn't also part of the gull-wing doors) and more than a few on the board behind the seats. They're never touched in the movies, though the Delorean model in the [[VideoGame/BackToTheFuture [[VideoGame/BackToTheFutureTheGame video game]] labels the buttons such things as "Flux front", "Coolsys 1", and "Alt".


-->'''Michael Knight:''' Thank you. What's all this? ''(gestures at dashboard)'' Looks like Darth Vader's bathroom.

to:

-->'''Michael Knight:''' -->'''Michael:''' Thank you. you. What's all this? this? ''(gestures at dashboard)'' Looks like [[Franchise/StarWars Darth Vader's Vader]]'s bathroom.

Added DiffLines:

-->'''Devon:''' Welcome on board the Knight 2000.
-->'''Michael Knight:''' Thank you. What's all this? ''(gestures at dashboard)'' Looks like Darth Vader's bathroom.

Added DiffLines:

* In ''ComicBook/TheLegendOfWonderWoman2016'' the Holliday Girls are amazed that Diana can control the aircraft they "borrow" due to the overwhelming number of buttons and switches in the cockpit.


* The cockpit of any Batmobile, from the '66 TV show to ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga''.

to:

* The cockpit of any Batmobile, from the '66 TV show to ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga''.''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy''.


** Two words: '''Gentoo Linux'''. Two more words: '''USE Flags'''. Every single package, every program down the ''kernel'', is compiled from source, tailored to your ''exact, explicit'' hardware and software specifications set beforehand. The next step in customization would be Linux from Scratch, or creating your own personal forks of programs. [[AwesomeButImpractical Most people, even Linux geeks, see no need for this, or indeed for compiling everything from source Gentoo-style.]] Gentoo is used mostly for servers with a very specific hardware configuration, for a very small gain in performance to add up over longtime 24/7 operation. Desktop "ricers" and hobbyists tend to veer more toward the precompiled binaries of Arch Linux.

to:

** Two words: '''Gentoo Linux'''. Two more words: '''USE Flags'''. Every single package, every program down the ''kernel'', is compiled from source, tailored to your ''exact, explicit'' hardware and software specifications set beforehand. The next step in customization would be Linux from Scratch, or creating your own personal forks of programs. [[EveryoneHasStandards Most people, even Linux geeks]], [[AwesomeButImpractical Most people, even Linux geeks, see no need for this, or indeed for compiling everything from source Gentoo-style.]] Gentoo is used mostly for servers with a very specific hardware configuration, for a very small gain in performance to add up over longtime 24/7 operation. Desktop "ricers" and hobbyists tend to veer more toward the precompiled binaries of Arch Linux.


*** Or how about the face-sized "Headbutt Button" [[YouFailBiologyForever (placed above the steering wheel on the dash)]]? To make Megas execute a headbutt, Coop must headbutt the gigantic red button, but not before a quick open-mouthed head-shake in proper LargeHam fashion.

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*** Or how about the face-sized "Headbutt Button" [[YouFailBiologyForever [[ArtisticLicenseBiology (placed above the steering wheel on the dash)]]? To make Megas execute a headbutt, Coop must headbutt the gigantic red button, but not before a quick open-mouthed head-shake in proper LargeHam fashion.

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