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* ''Literature/TheColdMoons'' is a {{Xenofiction}} fantasy about talking badgers. While there may be a decent audience for this short of thing if done right, as shown by the success of ''Literature/WarriorCats,'' ''WesternAnimation/LegendOfTheGuardiansTheOwlsOfGaHoole,'' and ''Literature/WatershipDown,'' badgers are not a appealing species choice to center a book on and it's only a uphill battle from there to get people's interest. Even If you can look past that, most people are put off by the dull sounding plot.


This can play out in the inherent struggles with trying to get people excited with niche genres (horror films with {{Squick}} and NauseaFuel), foreign material that doesn't translate well [[WidgetSeries (comedies with puns based on the native language)]], genres that were killed off some time ago ({{blaxploitation}} can only exist today in {{parody}}), adaptations of an existing property with a built-in stigma (''Literature/PeterPan'' is for kids because of the [[Disney/PeterPan Disney movie]]), trying to appeal to too many demographics at the same time (making only that part of the film intelligible to its target audience), or the execution itself takes things in an unexpected direction.

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This can play out in the inherent struggles with trying to get people excited with niche genres (horror films with {{Squick}} and NauseaFuel), foreign material that doesn't translate well [[WidgetSeries (comedies with puns based on the native language)]], genres that were killed off some time ago ({{blaxploitation}} can only exist today in {{parody}}), adaptations of an existing property with a built-in stigma (''Literature/PeterPan'' is for kids because of the [[Disney/PeterPan Disney movie]]), trying to appeal to too many demographics at the same time (making ([[UncertainAudience making only that part of the film intelligible to its target audience), audience]]), or the execution itself takes things in an unexpected direction.


* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' is something of a real-life subversion. Michelle Obama admits that, after she and her husband invited Creator/LinManuelMiranda to perform at the White House poetry slam and he told them he planned to perform a piece about UsefulNotes/AlexanderHamilton, they were... less than excited. And sure enough, when the performance did happen, the audience breaks out into bemused laughter as he explains that he will perform a hip-hop piece about Alexander Hamilton, as he felt embodied hip-hop. Even while singing the song itself, the audience starts laughing once he gets to the part where he solemnly repeats Hamilton's name. However, as proof that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the musical has become enormously successful anyway -- Michelle Obama later stated that it was the best work of art she'd seen in any form, ever, and the show is widely considered to be a very famous case of SugarWiki/BetterThanItSounds.

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* ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' is something of a real-life subversion. Michelle Obama admits that, after she and her husband invited Creator/LinManuelMiranda to perform at the White House poetry slam and he told them he planned to perform a piece about UsefulNotes/AlexanderHamilton, they were... less than excited. And sure enough, when the performance did happen, the audience breaks out into bemused laughter as he explains that he will perform a hip-hop piece about Alexander Hamilton, as he felt embodied hip-hop. Even while singing the song itself, the audience starts laughing once he gets to the part where he solemnly repeats Hamilton's name. However, as proof that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the musical has become enormously successful anyway -- Michelle Obama later stated that it was the best work of art she'd seen in any form, ever, and the show is widely considered to be a very famous case of SugarWiki/BetterThanItSounds.

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!!Live-Action Television
* In ''Series/KitchenNightmares'' episode "Piccolo Teatro", Gordon opens the episode by stating that "The French are a nation of meat lovers, each eating an average of 90 kilos of this stuff every year." The titular Piccolo Teatro was a vegetarian restaurant situated in Paris. Gordon was [[ThisIsGonnaSuck exasperated]] when he realized what he was up against, yet nonetheless proved to the owner that the restaurant was indeed capable of faring well in spite of the circumstances.[[note]]Or even because of its niche as one of the only vegetarian options in Paris.[[/note]] The ''real'' problem with the restaurant - and the reason why it went out of business - was its LazyBum owner that wasn't willing to be more hands-on in the restaurant business.


* In the late '00s, Creator/{{Stern}} attempted to market pinball machines to China. Unfortunately for them, they [[MisaimedMarketing didn't check in advance what would appeal to their potential new audience]] and began with ''Big Buck Hunter Pro'' and ''NBA''--while basketball is pretty popular in China, both of these machines are based on thoroughly American franchises largely unfamiliar to Chinese audiences. Pinball is also not a concept that's widely understood in China the way it is in western countries, rendering it incomprehensible to any curious onlookers.

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* In the late '00s, Creator/{{Stern}} attempted to market pinball machines to China. Unfortunately for them, they [[MisaimedMarketing didn't check in advance what would appeal to their potential new audience]] and began with ''Big Buck Hunter Pro'' and ''NBA''--while ''Pinball/{{NBA}}''--while basketball is pretty popular in China, both of these machines are based on thoroughly American franchises largely unfamiliar to Chinese audiences. Pinball is also not a concept that's widely understood in China the way it is in western countries, rendering it incomprehensible to any curious onlookers.


* Music/IgorStravinsky's ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'': A dissonant, loud and threatening avant-garde ballet about the ritual sacrifice of a young virgin in prehistoric times to hail a new Spring? Sounds lovely! In fact, during the premiere performance, the audience rioted.

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* Music/IgorStravinsky's ''Theatre/TheRiteOfSpring'': A dissonant, loud and threatening avant-garde ballet about the ritual sacrifice of a young virgin in prehistoric times to hail a new Spring? Sounds lovely! In fact, during the premiere performance, the audience rioted. It's telling that nowadays, the music is mostly associated with [[Disney/{{Fantasia}} dinosaurs]].


* Thomas Dixon's “UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan” trilogy, consisting of ''The Leopard's Spots'' (1902), ''The Clansman'' (1905) (which was adapted into ''Film/TheBirthOfANation1915''), and ''The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire'' (1907). If the informal name of the trilogy isn't already a red flag, the protagonists of the series are Reconstruction-era Klan members!

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* Thomas Dixon's “UsefulNotes/KuKluxKlan” trilogy, consisting of ''The Leopard's Spots'' (1902), ''The Clansman'' (1905) (which was adapted into ''Film/TheBirthOfANation1915''), and ''The Traitor: A Story of the Fall of the Invisible Empire'' (1907). If the informal name of the trilogy isn't already a red flag, the protagonists [[DesignatedHero protagonists]] of the series are Reconstruction-era Klan members!


* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really]]). Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.

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* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining pinning her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really]]). Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.


* When they were first invented in the mid-20th century, bikinis were not at all popular and were even banned or discouraged in various countries. The reasons should be obvious: A female swimsuit that amounts to little more than undergarments, invented by ''a man''. Being used to more modest traditional two-pieces, most women were not keen on walking around nearly naked in such contexts where it was mostly unheard of at the time.

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* When they were first invented in the mid-20th century, bikinis were not at all popular and were even banned or discouraged in various countries. The reasons should be obvious: A female swimsuit that amounts to little more than undergarments, invented by ''a man''. Being used to one-pieces and the more modest traditional two-pieces, most women were not keen on walking around nearly naked in such contexts where it was mostly unheard of at the time.time. It took a decade or two afterward for bikinis to gain acceptance.



* Whatever the merits of Music/{{U2}}'s ''Songs of Innocence'', a lot of people were creeped out by the way Apple automatically downloaded it to their libraries. Apple had to release a tool to remove the album for those who didn't want it.

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* Whatever the merits of Music/{{U2}}'s ''Songs of Innocence'', a lot of people were creeped out by the way Apple automatically downloaded it to their iTunes libraries. Apple had to release a tool to remove the album for those who didn't want it.


* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really]]) Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.

to:

* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really]]) really]]). Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.


* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really) Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.

to:

* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene and pining her mother into a chair while opening up the pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really) really]]) Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.


* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene before the act break of her slamming every window shut and shoving her mother in the closet. Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.

to:

* The notorious 1988 musical adaptation of ''Literature/{{Carrie}}'' was brought down most of all by how the story simply wasn't suited to the format, a downer tale of high school bullying that ends in mass slaughter with only a single character left alive for a limp final note. This especially affected the central set-piece of Carrie destroying the prom; the pig's blood prank that sets it off was done by Billy simply pouring a bucket of raspberry jam onto her head, followed by the actors all writhing around and desperately trying to give the impression of a level of destruction that is not possible to stage in live theater. The show was also noted for doing a terrible job of establishing Carrie's telekinetic powers for anyone not familiar with the novel or film, with her only breaking a light bulb in the opening scene before the act break of her slamming every window shut and shoving pining her mother in into a chair while opening up the closet. pit of hell ([[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmeiraZxdono no, really) Even an attempt to revamp the show in 2012 with a greatly revised script and several song changes didn't get much of anywhere, though it was at least seen as better use of the story's potential, and got the creators willing to license it out, unlike the original version.


[[folder:Food]]
* ''[[http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5830947-natural-harvest---a-collection-of-semen-based-recipes Natural Harvest -- A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes]]''
* Anything that involves deliberately cultivating rot or mould to produce the taste, from blue cheese to the traditional Icelandic ''hakarl'' (rotten ''shark'') to the Japanese ''natto'' (fermented soybeans), tends to generate this reaction from some. Even ''beer'', another product of fermentation, is an acquired taste for some people. Of special note is huitlacoche, a delicacy in Mexico consisting of corn infected with a parasitic fungus, better known to English-speakers as smut. The fungus proliferates in the corn kernels, swelling them up to massive proportions and turning them bluish. Few people outside of Mexico are willing to eat these things, even after attempts to call them names like "corn mushrooms" or "Mexican truffles" to make them sound more palatable (and they are harmless to humans even when raw), and huitlacoche is restricted or outright banned from import into most countries due to most people seeing it as a blight rather than something to eat. Their fears are {{justified|Trope}}, however, because farmers who just want to sell normal corn and consumers who just want to eat normal corn, will not appreciate this highly contagious fungus infecting these plants.
* For Westerners, eating insects.
* [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Combining both mould and insects]], [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu casu marzu]], [[MasochistsMeal an Italian cheese partially digested by live insect larvae.]] Cracked.com describes it as "so ashamed of its own existence it literally cries," due to it producing a thick liquid called "tears" by the people who make it.
* Foods based on offal squick out a lot of people, though they're perfectly happy to eat hot dogs and other sausages. The classic example is {{haggis|IsHorrible}} -- notorious for being the heart, lungs, and liver of a sheep, boiled in its own stomach (to quote the ''WesternAnimation/EarthwormJim'' cartoon); what many people don't know is that the first three ingredients are ''minced'' first (every description seems to go with "cut up" instead, wrongly implying that this offal is served in unappetizingly large chunks), making the whole thing more like eating a giant bratwurst. Other examples are the Mexican ''menudo'', a soup made of hominy and beef tripe, chitterlings (pig intestines), a staple of African American people in the South, and scrapple (a fried loaf of pork scraps mixed with cornmeal mush) in the mid-Atlantic.
** This is the basis for what's called "horumon" in Japan. Although it sounds like an Engrishified "hormone", it's actually a short form of "horu-mono" or "dug out-things", referring to scooping out the guts and innards and stewing or frying it into a meal.
* It's less common nowadays, but for a long time many people were put off of sushi because it's "raw fish". This stems from a fundamental misunderstanding when it comes to defining the word "sushi", which only refers the sticky, vinegar-seasoned rice that goes into various rolls and nigiri; not all types of sushi contain raw fish ("sashimi"). It's perfectly possible to have a great sushi dinner with nothing but vegetarian and/or fully-cooked rolls or nigiri like egg omelette, roasted eel or shrimp.
* Foie gras is made from specially-prepared duck or goose liver. Liver alone is off-putting to many, but preparing foie gras requires force-feeding the bird until its liver bloats up to 10 times its normal size, something that can make it even ''more'' off-putting. It's not surprising that foie gras is controversial.
* In many cultures, meat derived from certain animals are subject to taboo. The reasons are greatly varied: some examples include pork due to pigs being "unclean" (their dietary habits are considered off-putting), beef due to cows being considered too "holy", and horses, dogs and guinea pigs due to being considered too intelligent or too cute to be eaten. Taken even further in some cultures where there are taboos against eating meat period.
* There is a whole psychological phenomenon known as "food neophobia," which collectively is about people's hesitation to try foods they aren't familiar with. Most people have this to one extent or another (a widely-seen example is the aforementioned westerners' aversion to eating insects), and it stems from a natural instinct to avoid putting potentially poisonous or otherwise dangerous things in one's mouth.
* Fugu, a blowfish in which certain organs contain a deadly poison. Chefs are understandably only allowed to prepare it for customers after a three-year training course to make sure they can accurately remove all the dangerous parts, and there are still occasional deaths from improper preparation (almost all due to unlicensed chefs, or regular people trying to serve fugu at home without proper training). It's a delicacy in Japan but hasn't caught on anywhere else for obvious reasons.
* Veal is another controversial example. Not only is it meat from a baby cow, but meat from a baby cow that has been restricted from moving around in order to keep the meat tender and flavorful, which can also lead to abnormal development. Veal also tends to be more expensive than beef from older cattle so those willing to look past the unsavory aspects of production may not be willing to shell out extra cash for it.
* For more complete lists, see StockYuck and MasochistsMeal.
[[/folder]]


!!Webcomics
* ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' has [[https://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2008/08/01 iChoke-U]], a glove that strangles you when you beat Gabe in ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'' online.
--> '''Tycho''': It seems like marketing this might be tough.


Associated {{trope}}s and {{genre}}s include:

* SadistShow — It can be difficult to enjoy a work where people constantly get screwed over.
* GrossOutShow — ToiletHumour isn't to everyone's tastes.
* BlackComedy — Not everyone likes jokes about death and other things that most people are disturbed or horrified by.
* OscarBait — "I don't want to watch the {{superhero}} movie, I want to watch yet another movie about UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust!" is quite ARareSentence to be said without sarcasm.
* Anything excessively DarkerAndEdgier or LighterAndSofter than, or otherwise inconsistent with, the source material (particularly if said adaptation is InNameOnly.)
* Speaking of DarkerAndEdgier, this trope also encompasses [[CrapsackWorld settings]] that are [[EvenEvilHasStandards too excessively dark for anyone's taste]]:
** ExploitationFilm — Excessive violence and/or sexual content can be very off-putting.
** Anything revolving entirely around [[{{Gorn}} graphic violence]] — For a lot of people, it's not thrilling, just gross and disturbing.
** {{Dystopia}}s when written terribly.
** DarknessInducedAudienceApathy — When the entire setting and narrative are so hopeless and [[StrawNihilist nihilistic]] that the audience [[EightDeadlyWords just gives up rooting for the doomed characters]].
** AngstAversion
* {{Crossover}}s between [[StoryBreakerTeamUp incompatible works.]]
* CrackFic — {{Fanfiction}} that alienates potential audiences by having a premise that's too weird and ridiculous to take seriously.
* VillainProtagonist — If the main character of a work is intended to be the bad guy, it's unlikely the audience will root for them (especially if they're written to be as unlikable as possible).
* GenreBusting — You cannot rely on fans of a certain genre being at your beck and call if your work doesn't fit any one of them.
* Anything revolving entirely around {{Fanservice}}.
** Sexual taboos, such as incest or LoliconAndShotacon. Most people are going to feel uncomfortable about said themes, regardless of if they're PlayedForDrama or used as fetish material.
** PornWithPlot (bound to turn away people who just want to wank off and people who want plot but no explicit sex.)
* WidgetSeries — When a work is incomprehensible to people outside its country of origin (and sometimes even within).
* {{Deconstruction}}s, parodies, and sub-genres of genres that an audience isn't familiar with or haven't been prominent in the medium of work. How many people would really go to see a movie that parodies SteamPunk?
* AuthorTract — If a work's main purpose is to promote the author's views, anyone who disagrees with said views is bound to reject it on sight, while people who agree with it won't need to have their minds changed and may find the work boring.
** Anything ideologically sensitive (racist, sexist, antisemitic, etc.) — Anybody who disagrees with these views will probably avoid the work out of principle. See UnfortunateImplications and ValuesDissonance.
* [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids Anything with a protagonist significantly younger than its target audience]]. Adults will dismiss it for being too childish, while kids will be confused, bored, or terrified by the work's content.
* AdaptationDecay — TheyChangedItNowItSucks
* A work with a hardcore {{Geek}} or {{Nerd}} following tries too hard to reach mainstream audiences. The geeks will hate seeing their favorite franchise being dumbed down for the masses, while mainstream viewers won't have any particular reasons to pick this work over others.
* PanderingToTheBase — A work that appeals to hardcore geeks or nerds at the expense of mainstream audiences.
* MisaimedMarketing — There might have been an audience who'd have liked the premise, if only the work wasn't marketed towards a completely different group.
* FunnyAneurysmMoment or HarsherInHindsight — What might have been a perfectly acceptable premise when the work started production might become more alienating following unexpected real-life events.

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