Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Main / AsteroidThicket

Go To


Added DiffLines:

May be justified if the asteroids are actually a ShatteredWorld left over from a recent EarthShatteringKaboom.


*** The unreality of the ''Empire Strikes Back'' sequence is lampooned in [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/482.html this]] Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic. See also the page quote.

to:

*** The unreality of the ''Empire Strikes Back'' sequence is lampooned in [[http://www.irregularwebcomic.net/482.html this]] Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic.''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic''. See also the page quote.



** The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E6MuddsWomen}} Mudd's Women]]" shows the ''Enterprise'' chasing Harry Mudd's stolen ship through an asteroid belt (at relativistic speeds) where the asteroids are seen to zip past the ''Enterprise'' (as seen by the bridge screen that Kirk is looking at). The asteroids appeared to be spaced apart from each other at considerable distance rather than the traditional ''Franchise/StarWars''-type asteroid thicket.

to:

** The ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' episode "[[{{Recap/StarTrekS1E6MuddsWomen}} "[[Recap/StarTrekS1E6MuddsWomen Mudd's Women]]" shows the ''Enterprise'' chasing Harry Mudd's stolen ship through an asteroid belt (at relativistic speeds) where the asteroids are seen to zip past the ''Enterprise'' (as seen by the bridge screen that Kirk is looking at). The asteroids appeared to be spaced apart from each other at considerable distance rather than the traditional ''Franchise/StarWars''-type asteroid thicket.



* These show up scattered throughout the sector on the more interesting settings in VideoGame/ArtemisSpaceshipBridgeSimulator.
* DT3 has several of these during the [[https://youtu.be/DGcWhAaFJCE?t=58s shmups segment.]]

to:

* These show up scattered throughout the sector on the more interesting settings in VideoGame/ArtemisSpaceshipBridgeSimulator.
''VideoGame/ArtemisSpaceshipBridgeSimulator''.
* DT3 ''VideoGame/DistortedTravesty 3'' has several of these during the [[https://youtu.be/DGcWhAaFJCE?t=58s shmups segment.]]

Added DiffLines:

* Weaponized in ''Manga/SoulHunter'' by one of the Juttenkun's paopei, Tenzetsujin (Heaven-Cutting Formation), which takes the form of an asteroid thicket PocketDimension where the owner can attack his opponents by sending giant rock meteors their way.


* In its earlier stages of development, the Solar System had a lot of debris floating around crashing into each other and eventually forming the inner planets. The Late Heavy Bombardment was the final cleanup of this debris by the inner planets absorbing them via impacts, the craters of which can still be seen on the Moon and Mercury (and Mars[[note]]... which has probably suffered the worst, as an oblique impact by a Moon-sized body has led to it losing a full half of its crust and is a root cause of the current difference between its northern and southern hemispheres.[[/note]]. However, even this hodgepodge would have been extremely thin compared to its fictional counterpart, with the "cleanup" taking hundreds of millions of years.

to:

* In its earlier stages of development, the Solar System had a lot of debris floating around crashing into each other and eventually forming the inner planets. The Late Heavy Bombardment was the final cleanup of this debris by the inner planets absorbing them via impacts, the craters of which can still be seen on the Moon Moon, Mercury, and Mercury (and Mars[[note]]... which has probably suffered the worst, as an oblique impact by a Moon-sized body has led to it losing a full half of its crust and is a root cause of the current difference between its northern and southern hemispheres.[[/note]]. However, even this hodgepodge would have been extremely thin compared to its fictional counterpart, with the "cleanup" taking hundreds of millions of years.


** Averted and explained in ''The Martian Way'', where it's said that perhaps the spaceships didn't have to waste propellant to go around the asteroid belt, since, while on map it looks like a swarm of insects, it would take a serious stroke of bad luck to hit a rock.
** Asimov's first published story, ''Marooned off Vesta'', embodies this trope; but as explained in the ''2001'' example above, this is ScienceMarchesOn.
** In the short story "Feminine Intuition", important information about the location of the nearest planets suitable for human colonization is being transported via an aircraft along with the experimentally intuitive robot which calculated the locations. The aircraft is hit and destroyed by a meteorite. Because of how improbable it is, the characters speculate as to whether some higher intelligence orchestrated the meteor strike to keep Earth from learning about their alien neighbors. The odds against this happening are astronomical and in fact compared to the odds of guessing the location of planets to colonize in the first place (which is why they built an intuitive robot to do it).
* Lampshaded in ''The Astronaut's Apprentice'' by Philip Threadneedle. Before they reach the Asteroid Belt, Grandpa tells Bradley that you can jump from one asteroid to the next, or swing between them on ropes. Bradley (who read a book about the Solar System before leaving Earth) refuses to believe this, and tells Grandpa that the asteroid belt is "mostly empty". However, when they reach their destination, it turns out that Grandpa is correct.

to:

** Averted "Literature/FeminineIntuition": While the chief robopsychologist and explained in ''The Martian Way'', where it's said that perhaps the spaceships didn't have to waste propellant to go around the asteroid belt, since, while on map it looks like a swarm of insects, it would take a serious stroke of bad luck to hit a rock.
** Asimov's first published story, ''Marooned off Vesta'', embodies this trope; but as explained in the ''2001'' example above, this is ScienceMarchesOn.
** In the short story "Feminine Intuition",
prototype robot with important information about the location of the nearest planets suitable for human colonization is nearby habitable exoplanets are being transported via an aircraft along with the experimentally intuitive robot which calculated the locations. The aircraft is aircraft, they're hit and destroyed by a meteorite. Because of how improbable it is, the characters speculate as to whether some higher intelligence orchestrated the meteor strike to keep Earth from learning about their alien neighbors. The odds against this happening are astronomical and in fact so astronomically high, they're compared to the odds of guessing the location of planets exoplanets to colonize in the first place (which place.
** Averted and explained in "Literature/TheMartianWay", where it's said that perhaps the spaceships didn't have to waste propellant to go around the asteroid belt, since, while on map it looks like a swarm of insects, it would take a serious stroke of bad luck to hit a rock.
%%** Asimov's first published story, "Literature/MaroonedOffVesta", embodies this trope; but as explained in the ''2001'' example above, this
is why they built an intuitive robot to do it).
ScienceMarchesOn.
* Lampshaded in ''The ''[[Literature/TheAstronautsApprentice The Astronaut's Apprentice'' Apprentice]]'' by Philip Threadneedle.Literature/PhilipThreadneedle. Before they reach the Asteroid Belt, Grandpa tells Bradley that you can jump from one asteroid to the next, or swing between them on ropes. Bradley (who read a book about the Solar System before leaving Earth) refuses to believe this, and tells Grandpa that the asteroid belt is "mostly empty". However, when they reach their destination, it turns out that Grandpa is correct.


** In ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' the book takes care to note that the asteroids are far enough apart that the risk of being hit by one is infinitesimally small. Nevertheless ''The Rolling Stone'' takes precautions anyway when they enter an unusually dense field that's a haven for miners. Averted in that nothing happens to the ship.

to:

** In ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' ''Literature/TheRollingStones'', the book takes care to note that the asteroids are far enough apart that the risk of being hit by one is infinitesimally small. Nevertheless ''The Rolling Stone'' takes precautions anyway when they enter an unusually dense field that's a haven for miners. Averted in that nothing happens to the ship.


* Creator/RobertAHeinlein said the same thing in ''Literature/FarmerInTheSky'' when the narrator observes that the 'old pile drive' ships used to 'plow right through the asteroid field and none of them was ever hit enough to matter', though the universe had a belt more densely packed than in RealLife due to ScienceMarchesOn. Nevertheless, he had the ''Mayflower'' bypass the Asteroid Belt, to [[TemptingFate avoid even that tiny chance]]. Nevertheless, [[{{Irony}} the ''Mayflower'' was hit]].
** Similarly, in Heinlein's other Young Adult novel ''Literature/SpaceCadet'', the captain of the [[SpacePolice Space Patrol]] ship ''Aes Triplex'' is not concerned about colliding with an asteroid while searching for the missing ''Pathfinder''. However, as above, the ''Pathfinder'' was also holed by a meteor with the loss of all hands due to ExplosiveDecompression.
** And in ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' the book takes care to note that the asteroids are far enough apart that the risk of being hit by one is infinitesimally small. Nevertheless ''The Rolling Stone'' takes precautions anyway when they enter an unusually dense field that's a haven for miners. Averted in that nothing happens to the ship.

to:

* Creator/RobertAHeinlein said the same thing in ''Literature/FarmerInTheSky'' when the Creator/RobertAHeinlein
** ''Literature/FarmerInTheSky''. The
narrator observes that the 'old pile drive' ships used to 'plow right through the asteroid field and none of them was ever hit enough to matter', though the universe had a belt more densely packed than in RealLife due to ScienceMarchesOn. Nevertheless, he had the ''Mayflower'' bypass the Asteroid Belt, to [[TemptingFate avoid even that tiny chance]]. Nevertheless, [[{{Irony}} the ''Mayflower'' was hit]].
** Similarly, in In Heinlein's other Young Adult novel ''Literature/SpaceCadet'', the captain of the [[SpacePolice Space Patrol]] ship ''Aes Triplex'' is not concerned about colliding with an asteroid while searching for the missing ''Pathfinder''. However, as above, the ''Pathfinder'' was also holed by a meteor with the loss of all hands due to ExplosiveDecompression.
** And in In ''Literature/TheRollingStones'' the book takes care to note that the asteroids are far enough apart that the risk of being hit by one is infinitesimally small. Nevertheless ''The Rolling Stone'' takes precautions anyway when they enter an unusually dense field that's a haven for miners. Averted in that nothing happens to the ship.



* Completely averted in Creator/LarryNiven's ''Literature/KnownSpace'' universe. Larry is well known for [[ShownTheirWork Showing His Work]]. Belters are explicitly described as spending months at a time alone, flying their singleships between asteroids on prospecting runs. He even extrapolates and uses the ramifications in his stories. Not everyone has the kind of personalty to handle that amount of nothing for the length of time that is required to get from place to place. The ones who can't never come back to port. Belter society is made of the ones who can.

to:

* Completely averted in Creator/LarryNiven's ''Literature/KnownSpace'' universe.universe
** Completely averted in Earth's solar system.
Larry is well known for [[ShownTheirWork Showing His Work]]. Belters are explicitly described as spending months at a time alone, flying their singleships between asteroids on prospecting runs. He even extrapolates and uses the ramifications in his stories. Not everyone has the kind of personalty to handle that amount of nothing for the length of time that is required to get from place to place. The ones who can't never come back to port. Belter society is made of the ones who can.



* In ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'' humans visiting an alien solar system find the asteroids too far from the inhabited world to make sense. They learn that the asteroids were pushed farther out after a war when one of sides pushed them inward, raining them onto the planet.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'' ''Literature/TheMoteInGodsEye'', humans visiting an alien solar system find the asteroids too far from the inhabited world to make sense. They learn that the asteroids were pushed farther out after a war when one of sides pushed them inward, raining them onto the planet.


* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1942'': The Saturnians are building a road through the solar system using tightly packed asteroids, which Diana points out is impossible and makes no sense. Once she arrives at Saturn she discovers they're doing so anyway and she and ComicBook/SteveTrevor destroy the space road which was being built using conscripted slave labor and was intended to be part of Saturn's invasion of earth.

to:

* ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1942'': ''Franchise/WonderWoman'' [[ComicBook/WonderWoman1942 Vol 1]]: The Saturnians are building a road through the solar system using tightly packed asteroids, which Diana points out is impossible and makes no sense. Once she arrives at Saturn she discovers they're doing so anyway and she and ComicBook/SteveTrevor destroy the space road which was being built using conscripted slave labor and was intended to be part of Saturn's invasion of earth.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'': {{Discussed|Trope}} before a battle near an asteroid field in ''Revenant Gun'' -- the viewpoint character notes that the asteroids are too dispersed to pose a danger to even a large fleet, but the real threat is that enemy ships might hide behind them for an ambush.

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerbTheMovieCandaceAgainstTheUniverse'': Phineas and company encounter one as they fly towards Feebla-Oot. Thanks to some help from Perry, they're able to make it through unscathed.

Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/AstroKid'': The plot of the movie is kicked off by an asteroid field destroying the space ship of Willy and his parents, forcing Willy to use an EscapePod which ends up crash landing on an unknown planet.

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Asian Animation]]
* ''Animation/ThreeThousandWhysOfBlueCat'': One scene in "Will Earth Be Destroyed?" has an extremely thick asteroid belt with asteroids flying everywhere.
[[/folder]]

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/CryingSuns'', stationary asteroids are a common terrain feature during space battles. They come in two sizes: small asteroids, which slow any squadrons passing through them but also provide cover, and large asteroids, which are impassable obstacles that your squadrons must fly around. Some maps have only a few asteroids, while others have enough large asteroids to form a natural maze with chokepoints.

Added DiffLines:

* The ''WesternAnimation/MiloMurphysLaw'' episode "Milo in Space" has one of the ships [[BornUnlucky Milo]] travels in destroyed by a small cluster of asteroids floating together. {{Justified}}, of course, because ''[[TheJinx of course that would happen to Milo]],'' scientific probability be darned.


* Analyses of identified extrasolar asteroid belts indicate that they are much thicker than our own. Granted that's just the ones that we can see from several light-years away, so there's probably a lot more that are just as sparse if not sparser than the one in our system.
* The closest this trope gets to real life is companion asteroids, where small asteroids orbit larger ones, sometimes as little as 90 meters from each other. This is generally rare, though, and it would still take appalling luck or monumental idiocy for a spacecraft to impact one.

to:

* Analyses of identified extrasolar asteroid belts indicate that they are much thicker than our own. Granted that's just the ones that we can see from several light-years away, so there's probably a lot more that are just as sparse if not sparser than the one in our system.
system. Of particular note is Tau Ceti, which has an asteroid belt ten times as dense as the one orbiting the sun.
* The closest this trope gets to real life life--in our own solar system, anyway-- is companion asteroids, where small asteroids orbit larger ones, sometimes as little as 90 meters from each other. This is generally rare, though, and it would still take appalling luck or monumental idiocy for a spacecraft to impact one.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 437

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report