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** In the same DLC you can learn that Traynor is a competive-level player of an asari strategy game, complete with a SitcomArchnemesis rival who teaches it professionally.

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* Sharks like HeavyMetal music because it reminds them of struggling prey


* Averted in the ''Literature/ChanurNovels'' by Creator/CJCherryh. For the color-blind kif art consists of objects with bumps, concavities and varying textures which is appreciated by feeling it with your hands. For the stsho art consists of interior art and abstract paintings, both of which are done in infinite shades of white.

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* Averted in the ''Literature/ChanurNovels'' by Creator/CJCherryh. For the color-blind kif art consists of objects with bumps, concavities and varying textures which is appreciated by feeling it with your hands. For the stsho art consists of interior art and abstract paintings, both of which are done in infinite shades of white. This leads to the crew [[AccidentalArt creating a masterpeice of interior design completely by accident]] by painting a stsho passenger's quarters white and grabbing a random assortment of white furniture.


* ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Undiscovered Country}}'': When aliens threaten to destroy Earth, it turns out it is because they cannot hear whalesong.

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* ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Undiscovered Country}}'': IV|TheVoyageHome}}'': When aliens threaten to destroy Earth, it turns out it is because they cannot hear whalesong.



* Some of the licensed novels for ''Franchise/StarTrek'' indicate that Cardassians are fond of stained glass windows, not having a similar art form in their culture.


* ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Undiscovered Country}}'': When aliens threaten to destroy Earth, it turns out it is because they cannot hear whalesong.



* Often in the ''Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse'':

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* Often in the ''Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse'':''Literature/StarTrekNovelVerse'':



* Some of the licensed novels for ''Franchise/StarTrek'' indicate that Cardassians are fond of stained glass windows, not having a similar art form in their culture.



** In some versions of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', human adolescents appreciate Klingon heavy metal. It is apparently pretty much the same thing as our heavy metal, except that Klingons do it and it's in their character, so it becomes "alien". Their opera, on the other hand, is supposedly without any direct real-world equivalent.
** The trope runs both ways in ''Star Trek'', as Klingons have a particular affinity for the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare, and often say that to get its full effect, it must be read "in the original Klingon." The single exception to this is ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', which is actively despised by Klingons. Whereas humans see it as the tale of two tragic, star-crossed lovers doomed to die, Klingons see it as a story of two children act like honorless ''ptaq'' who put "love" ahead of family loyalty and duty and thereby dishonor their parents.
** There's an episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' in which a technically-minded alien race is entranced by the Doctor's singing, an art that they'd never experienced before. It later turns out they have distinctly non-human tastes in this department; they are impressed by technically hard pieces that have no rhyme or reason to them.
** And then of course, there is ''Star Trek IV'', when aliens threaten to destroy Earth because they cannot hear whalesong.
** After figuring out that Tamarian language is based on metaphors from their own mythology, Picard attempts to connect with Dathon by reciting the Epic of Gilgamesh. Notably, it's the one proper noun Dathon recites in the entire episode that is not from his own mythology. At the end of the episode, the events that took place enter Tamarian mythology in their own right.
** The TNG episode "First Contact" (not to be confused with the film) reveals that it's standard Federation procedure to pirate a selection of entertainment programs of a civilization about to discover faster-than-light technology, to help them get a sense of what the race's society is like. One of the people contacted in the episode is quite embarrassed at this idea, and Picard admits that they give an "incomplete" picture of the society.
** A ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode has the crew encounter a race of HumanAliens with three sexes. The alien captain turns out to be a huge fan of plays, going through Shakespeare and Sophocles in a matter of hours.
** Played with in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' in the case of the Vorta, who apparently have no appreciation for any aesthetics at all, leading to [[CloudCuckooLander Weyoun]] asking Kira if one of Ziyal's paintings would look better if it were blue.
*** Ziyal's paintings themselves are a somewhat extreme case, as apparently mixing Cardassian and Bajoran painting techniques somehow ends up producing works that are appreciated by both cultures. Possibly justified by her style being ''extremely'' abstract.
*** Also played with in the episode ''The Wire''. Garak gives Dr. Bashir an apparently very popular Cardassian novel to read and Bashir thinks it's terrible (and from the description we get of it he's right). Meanwhile Garak reads Julius Caesar and is thoroughly unimpressed, commenting that Caesar should have known Brutus was going to betray him from the first act. This leads to Garak failing to explain the point of the "repetitive epic", and Bashir failing to explain the concept of "tragedy". Also in the episode "Distant Voices", Garak gives Bashir a holosuite program based on an "Enigma" novel, reasoning Bashir loves mystery novels. The problem with Enigma tales, as Bashir states it, is that in the end, everyone is guilty; while Garak believes the appeal is in trying to determine ''who'' is guilty of ''what'' crimes.
*** Garak is also quite horrified when Bashir tells him the tale of the boy that cried wolf. He is appalled that Terrans consider such a violent and graphic tale appropriate for children. He also disagrees with the intended Aesop, believing the ''[[AlternateAesopInterpretation real]]'' lesson is "That you should never tell the same lie twice."
** In the ''Voyager'' double episode where the ship returns to 1990s earth, Neelix and Kes are seen thoroughly enjoying a SoapOpera they've found being telecast. The humans themselves actually relate to it less, finding it hard to watch a show without taking part in a Holodeck.
** A later episode of ''Voyager'' depicting an ancestor of Janeway makes an aside reference to the fact that the Ferengi consider [[BigApplesauce Wall Street]] to be the closest thing in their culture to a holy site, despite the fact that the location is no longer used for trading.

to:

** In some versions of ''Franchise/StarTrek'', versions, human adolescents appreciate Klingon heavy metal. It is apparently pretty much the same thing as our heavy metal, except that Klingons do it and it's in their character, so it becomes "alien". Their opera, on the other hand, is supposedly without any direct real-world equivalent.
** The trope runs both ways in ''Star Trek'', ways, as Klingons have a particular affinity for the works of Creator/WilliamShakespeare, and often say that to get its full effect, it must be read "in the original Klingon." The single exception to this is ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', which is actively despised by Klingons. Whereas humans see it as the tale of two tragic, star-crossed lovers doomed to die, Klingons see it as a story of two children act like honorless ''ptaq'' who put "love" ahead of family loyalty and duty and thereby dishonor their parents.
** There's an episode of ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' in which a technically-minded alien race is entranced by the Doctor's singing, an art that they'd never experienced before. It later turns out they have distinctly non-human tastes in this department; they are impressed by technically hard pieces that have no rhyme or reason to them.
** And then of course, there is ''Star Trek IV'', when aliens threaten to destroy Earth because they cannot hear whalesong.
** After figuring out that Tamarian language is based on metaphors from their own mythology, Picard attempts to connect with Dathon by reciting the Epic of Gilgamesh. Notably, it's the one proper noun Dathon recites in the entire episode that is not from his own mythology. At the end of the episode, the events that took place enter Tamarian mythology in their own right.
** The TNG episode "First Contact" (not to be confused with the film) reveals that it's standard Federation procedure to pirate a selection of entertainment programs of a civilization about to discover faster-than-light technology, to help them get a sense of what the race's society is like. One of the people contacted in the episode is quite embarrassed at this idea, and Picard admits that they give an "incomplete" picture of the society.
** A ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode has the crew encounter a race of HumanAliens with three sexes. The alien captain turns out to be a huge fan of plays, going through Shakespeare and Sophocles in a matter of hours.
** Played with in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' in the case of the Vorta, who apparently have no appreciation for any aesthetics at all, leading to [[CloudCuckooLander Weyoun]] asking Kira if one of Ziyal's paintings would look better if it were blue.
*** Ziyal's paintings themselves are a somewhat extreme case, as apparently mixing Cardassian and Bajoran painting techniques somehow ends up producing works that are appreciated by both cultures. Possibly justified by her style being ''extremely'' abstract.
*** Also played with in the episode ''The Wire''. Garak gives Dr. Bashir an apparently very popular Cardassian novel to read and Bashir thinks it's terrible (and from the description we get of it he's right). Meanwhile Garak reads Julius Caesar and is thoroughly unimpressed, commenting that Caesar should have known Brutus was going to betray him from the first act. This leads to Garak failing to explain the point of the "repetitive epic", and Bashir failing to explain the concept of "tragedy". Also in the episode "Distant Voices", Garak gives Bashir a holosuite program based on an "Enigma" novel, reasoning Bashir loves mystery novels. The problem with Enigma tales, as Bashir states it, is that in the end, everyone is guilty; while Garak believes the appeal is in trying to determine ''who'' is guilty of ''what'' crimes.
*** Garak is also quite horrified when Bashir tells him the tale of the boy that cried wolf. He is appalled that Terrans consider such a violent and graphic tale appropriate for children. He also disagrees with the intended Aesop, believing the ''[[AlternateAesopInterpretation real]]'' lesson is "That you should never tell the same lie twice."
** In the ''Voyager'' double episode where the ship returns to 1990s earth, Neelix and Kes are seen thoroughly enjoying a SoapOpera they've found being telecast. The humans themselves actually relate to it less, finding it hard to watch a show without taking part in a Holodeck.
** A later episode of ''Voyager'' depicting an ancestor of Janeway makes an aside reference to the fact that the Ferengi consider [[BigApplesauce Wall Street]] to be the closest thing in their culture to a holy site, despite the fact that the location is no longer used for trading.
parents.



** Some of the licensed novels indicate that Cardassians are fond of stained glass windows, not having a similar art form in their culture.


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** ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'':
*** After figuring out that Tamarian language is based on metaphors from their own mythology, Picard attempts to connect with Dathon by reciting the Epic of Gilgamesh. Notably, it's the one proper noun Dathon recites in the entire episode that is not from his own mythology. At the end of the episode, the events that took place enter Tamarian mythology in their own right.
*** The episode "First Contact" (not to be confused with [[Film/StarTrekFirstContact the film]]) reveals that it's standard Federation procedure to pirate a selection of entertainment programs of a civilization about to discover faster-than-light technology, to help them get a sense of what the race's society is like. One of the people contacted in the episode is quite embarrassed at this idea, and Picard admits that they give an "incomplete" picture of the society.
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
*** Played with in the case of the Vorta, who apparently have no appreciation for any aesthetics at all, leading to [[CloudCuckooLander Weyoun]] asking Kira if one of Ziyal's paintings would look better if it were blue. Ziyal's paintings themselves are a somewhat extreme case, as apparently mixing Cardassian and Bajoran painting techniques somehow ends up producing works that are appreciated by both cultures. Possibly justified by her style being ''extremely'' abstract.
*** Played with in the episode "The Wire". Garak gives Dr. Bashir an apparently very popular Cardassian novel to read and Bashir thinks it's terrible (and from the description we get of it he's right). Meanwhile Garak reads Julius Caesar and is thoroughly unimpressed, commenting that Caesar should have known Brutus was going to betray him from the first act. This leads to Garak failing to explain the point of the "repetitive epic", and Bashir failing to explain the concept of "tragedy". Also in the episode "Distant Voices", Garak gives Bashir a holosuite program based on an "Enigma" novel, reasoning Bashir loves mystery novels. The problem with Enigma tales, as Bashir states it, is that in the end, everyone is guilty; while Garak believes the appeal is in trying to determine ''who'' is guilty of ''what'' crimes.
*** Garak is quite horrified when Bashir tells him the tale of the boy that cried wolf. He is appalled that Terrans consider such a violent and graphic tale appropriate for children. He also disagrees with the intended Aesop, believing the ''[[AlternateAesopInterpretation real]]'' lesson is "That you should never tell the same lie twice."
** ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'':
*** There's an episode in which a technically-minded alien race is entranced by the Doctor's singing, an art that they'd never experienced before. It later turns out they have distinctly non-human tastes in this department; they are impressed by technically hard pieces that have no rhyme or reason to them.
*** In the double episode where the ship returns to 1990s Earth, Neelix and Kes are seen thoroughly enjoying a SoapOpera they've found being telecast. The humans themselves actually relate to it less, finding it hard to watch a show without taking part in a Holodeck.
*** An episode depicting an ancestor of Janeway makes an aside reference to the fact that the Ferengi consider [[BigApplesauce Wall Street]] to be the closest thing in their culture to a holy site, despite the fact that the location is no longer used for trading.
** A ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode has the crew encounter a race of HumanAliens with three sexes. The alien captain turns out to be a huge fan of plays, going through Shakespeare and Sophocles in a matter of hours.

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* Dogs enjoy human music, and while individual tastes vary it seems most [[https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-38757761 prefer reggae and soft rock]]. Subverted with cats, who [[https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/cats-dont-like-human-music-play-instead prefer music tailor-made to suit their tastes instead]]. Really, is anyone surprised?


*** Also played with in the episode ''The Wire''. Garak gives Dr. Bashir a Cardassian novel to read and Bashir thinks it's terrible (and from the description we get of it he's right). Meanwhile Garak reads Julius Caesar and is thoroughly unimpressed, commenting that Caesar should have known Brutus was going to betray him from the first act. This leads to Garak failing to explain the point of the "repetitive epic", and Bashir failing to explain the concept of "tragedy". Also in the episode "Distant Voices", Garak gives Bashir a holosuite program based on an "Enigma" novel, reasoning Bashir loves mystery novels. The problem with Enigma tales, as Bashir states it, is that in the end, everyone is guilty; while Garak believes the appeal is in trying to determine ''who'' is guilty of ''what'' crimes.
*** Garak is also quite horrified when Bashir tells him the tale of the boy that cried wolf. He is appalled that Terrans consider such a violent and graphic tale appropriate for children.

to:

*** Also played with in the episode ''The Wire''. Garak gives Dr. Bashir a an apparently very popular Cardassian novel to read and Bashir thinks it's terrible (and from the description we get of it he's right). Meanwhile Garak reads Julius Caesar and is thoroughly unimpressed, commenting that Caesar should have known Brutus was going to betray him from the first act. This leads to Garak failing to explain the point of the "repetitive epic", and Bashir failing to explain the concept of "tragedy". Also in the episode "Distant Voices", Garak gives Bashir a holosuite program based on an "Enigma" novel, reasoning Bashir loves mystery novels. The problem with Enigma tales, as Bashir states it, is that in the end, everyone is guilty; while Garak believes the appeal is in trying to determine ''who'' is guilty of ''what'' crimes.
*** Garak is also quite horrified when Bashir tells him the tale of the boy that cried wolf. He is appalled that Terrans consider such a violent and graphic tale appropriate for children. He also disagrees with the intended Aesop, believing the ''[[AlternateAesopInterpretation real]]'' lesson is "That you should never tell the same lie twice."

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Spacetrawler}}'', Dmitri licenses his grandmother's cookie recipe to an alien baker for galactic distribution. They're an instant hit, and he and the baker both become billionaires overnight.


** In ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina'', the government of Lorina has decorated its public buildings in a wide variety of alien art forms, most of them from the Federation. The public speakers even play Andorian music. One of the art styles on display is Tellarite Erotic Abstract (introduced as part of a SugarWiki/{{Funny Moment|s}} in ''Literature/StarTrekMillennium'').

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** In ''Literature/StarTrekExMachina'', the government of Lorina has decorated its public buildings in a wide variety of alien art forms, most of them from the Federation. The public speakers even play Andorian music. One of the art styles on display is Tellarite Erotic Abstract (introduced as part of a SugarWiki/{{Funny Moment|s}} in ''Literature/StarTrekMillennium'').



--->[[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments "Insincere endorsement: You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have heard him in the voice of elcor."]]

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--->[[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments "Insincere --->"Insincere endorsement: You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have heard him in the voice of elcor."]]"



* Koko the gorilla, who speaks in sign language, is a fan of ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood.'' It was a big SugarWiki/{{Heartwarming Moment|s}} when she got to meet him in person.

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* Koko the gorilla, who speaks in sign language, is a fan of ''Series/MisterRogersNeighborhood.'' It was a big SugarWiki/{{Heartwarming Moment|s}} heartwarming moment when she got to meet him in person.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Amphibia}}'':
** In the episode "Taking Charge", Anne introduces the Plantars to the show "Suspicion Island", a soap opera cross between ''Series/{{Lost}}'' and ''Series/{{Survivor}}''. Sprig and Polly love it to the point they're using [[PersonAsVerb character names as verbs]], but Hopadiah "Hop Pop" Plantar isn't a fan, [[spoiler: or so he claims. In truth, he loves the show to the point he binge-watched the whole season while everyone else was sleeping, nearly draining Anne's phone battery completely.]]
** In the episode "Civil Wart", Anne introduces the populace of Wartwood to the movie "Love Choice", a post-apocalyptic teen romance movie which ends on a cliffhanger as to which guy the main character Constance chooses. The rugged cyborg in flannel Hunter, or the sensitive hooded deer-man Alastair. The townspeople were so invested into the story and characters that the entire town of Wartwood was split in half in [[ShipToShipCombat a shipping war]].


* Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse:

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* Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse:Franchise/StarWarsLegends:

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* In ''Fanfic/EarthsAlienHistory'', human philosophies like free capitalism and Marxism become very popular among the working classes of the Klingon Empire as social tensions rise in the 23rd century.


* Played rather darkly in ''Literature/DanielX''. The alien criminal Ergent Seth loves American horror movies (even trying to direct a few himself) , drinks coffee, and off-handedly mentions watching ''Series/TwentyFour'' on his hip, but his EvilPlan is based on enslaving some humans and killing the rest; the arts of Earth are ''all'' he cares about.

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* Played rather darkly in ''Literature/DanielX''. The alien criminal Ergent Seth loves American horror movies (even trying to direct a few himself) , himself), lets his minions play guitar music, drinks coffee, and off-handedly mentions watching ''Series/TwentyFour'' on his hip, ship, but his EvilPlan is based on enslaving some humans and killing the rest; the arts of Earth are ''all'' he cares about.

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* Played rather darkly in ''Literature/DanielX''. The alien criminal Ergent Seth loves American horror movies (even trying to direct a few himself) , drinks coffee, and off-handedly mentions watching ''Series/TwentyFour'' on his hip, but his EvilPlan is based on enslaving some humans and killing the rest; the arts of Earth are ''all'' he cares about.


* ''Webcomic/QuentynQuinnSpaceRanger'' shows how one can appreciate art intended for senses one doesn't have, using [[http://www.rhjunior.com/QQSR/00053.html a robot and an ice cream sundae.]] Said robot also states that Quentyn lacks antennae or electromagnetic sensors, but still enjoys certain sculptures made by a race that has both.

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* ''Webcomic/QuentynQuinnSpaceRanger'' shows how one can appreciate art intended for senses one doesn't have, using [[http://www.rhjunior.com/QQSR/00053.html com/quentyn-quinn-space-ranger-0053/ a robot and an ice cream sundae.]] Said robot also states that Quentyn lacks antennae or electromagnetic sensors, but still enjoys certain sculptures made by a race that has both.

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