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* Mizoguchi's ending in the first instalment of the ''VideoGame/FightersHistory'' FightingGame series has him get dragged off to another tournament by a man with a funny mustache, with him predictably protesting with "You gotta be kidding! Hey, get me outta here!". The SNES port changes Mizoguchi's dialogue to "I will try my best! Let's go!", but still depicts Mizoguchi getting dragged off.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Hilda}}'': Season 1 Chapters 12 and 13, which adapt the [[ComicBook/{{Hilda}} graphic novel]] ''Hilda and the Black Hound'', keep the subplot about Hilda failing to get any Sparrow Scout badges. However, while this was a valid plot point in the original graphic novel, here it contradicts the events of Chapter 7, which contains a story unique to the animated series in which Hilda, David and Frida succeed in gathering a Blue Nettle for their botany badge.


If there is simply a lack of explanation as to why something happened, instead of a full-on PlotHole, it's AdaptationExplanationExtrication.

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If there is simply a lack of explanation as to why something happened, instead of a full-on PlotHole, it's AdaptationExplanationExtrication.
AdaptationExplanationExtrication. Contrast AdaptationalExplanation where a plot hole gets fixed in an adaptation.


* The manual for the NES version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonI'' mentions that Abobo "likes to throw bombs and slap people around. These are references to his Atomic Throw and Hand Slap moves from the arcade version, which were DummiedOut of the NES version.

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* The manual for the NES version of ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonI'' mentions that Abobo "likes to throw bombs and slap people around. These are references to his Atomic Throw and Hand Slap moves from the arcade version, which were DummiedOut of the NES version.


* In most literary versions of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'', the land where Beauty lives isn't the land ruled by the Beast/Prince's family, nor is the enchanted castle his own castle - he was only placed there for his safety for the duration of the curse, and in the end he and Beauty are transported to his homeland. In [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast the Disney version]], the enchanted castle is his own, so the audience is left to wonder why neither Belle nor any of her neighbors know that the castle exists or that their prince was turned into a beast. The [[Film/BeautyAndTheBeast2017 2017 live-action remake]] fills this plot hole in a new way, by [[LaserGuidedAmnesia having the curse make the whole kingdom forget the existence of the castle and everyone inside it.]]

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* In most literary versions of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'', the land where Beauty lives isn't the land ruled by the Beast/Prince's family, nor is the enchanted castle his own castle - he was only placed there for his safety for the duration of the curse, and in the end he and Beauty are transported to his homeland. In [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast [[WesternAnimation/BeautyAndTheBeast the Disney version]], the enchanted castle is his own, so the audience is left to wonder why neither Belle nor any of her neighbors know that the castle exists or that their prince was turned into a beast. The [[Film/BeautyAndTheBeast2017 2017 live-action remake]] fills this plot hole in a new way, by [[LaserGuidedAmnesia having the curse make the whole kingdom forget the existence of the castle and everyone inside it.]]


* In ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'', Vegeta [[DeathByAdaptation kills Ginyu]] rather than sparing him like he did in the source material. This eventually brings up a plot hole when the Ginyu Forces gather together at King Kai's planet yet Captain Ginyu himself is not present as he doesn't die in the canon.

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* In ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'', Vegeta [[DeathByAdaptation kills Ginyu]] rather than sparing him like he did in the source material. This eventually brings up a plot hole when the Ginyu Forces gather together at King Kai's planet yet Captain Ginyu himself is not present as he doesn't die in the canon. [[note]] However, the whole Ginyu Forces go to King Kai's planet is itself a non-canon mini arc so, make that what you will.[[/note]]


* A minor example in WesternAnimation/AliceInWonderland: when Alice grows to giant size in the forest a bird mistakes her for a serpent, even if she looks nothing like one. In the original book, it was her ''neck'' that had grown out of proportion, which makes the mistake more believable.

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* A minor example in WesternAnimation/AliceInWonderland: ''WesternAnimation/AliceInWonderland'': when Alice grows to giant size in the forest a bird mistakes her for a serpent, even if she looks nothing like one. In [[Literature/AlicesAdventuresInWonderland the original book, book]], it was her ''neck'' that had grown out of proportion, which makes the mistake more believable.

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* A minor example in WesternAnimation/AliceInWonderland: when Alice grows to giant size in the forest a bird mistakes her for a serpent, even if she looks nothing like one. In the original book, it was her ''neck'' that had grown out of proportion, which makes the mistake more believable.


** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe [[note]]Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on[[/note]]. Plus, they showed up [[DarkestHour at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing]], making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new superhero team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.

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** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up lineups over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe [[note]]Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on[[/note]].on--and one of the few characters who didn't have a common power, Songbird, didn't have the same abilities that she'd had back when she was Screaming Mimi.[[/note]]. Plus, they showed up [[DarkestHour at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing]], making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new superhero team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.

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** ''AdaptationInducedPlotHole/OnePiece''


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** ''AdaptationInducedPlotHole/YuGiOh''

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** ''AdaptationInducedPlotHole/SailorMoon''

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* What are generally considered the two biggest flaws in the [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2Remake 2019 remake]] of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' are the numerous examples of {{Continuity Snarl}}s and plotholes caused by the story's "reimagination".
** In the intro, the truck driver heading in to Raccoon City is shown listening to a radio show talking about a caller's encounter with a zombie, while said caller acts like he just ran into a drunk person. Given that the outbreak is a week in, it is never explained why the caller is so calm, given that an entire city is overrun with the undead and a military imposed quarantine is in effect. Zombies appearing on the outskirts of the city implies that the caller isn't from the city proper, but it remains unclear as to why word hasn't begun to spread to outlying towns by then.
** Elliot and Marvin needing Claire/Leon to find a way out of the station seems rather jarring, given that neither the front doors nor the main gates are in any way locked, allowing just anyone to stroll in as they please. In fact, that's exactly how the scenario A character entered the precinct. But after exploring the East Wing and returning, the front doors are magically barricaded, though this can be easily handwaved that Marvin and the first run protagonist were able to barricade the doors after saving their life. Though, given the [[ZombieApocalypse state]] of the streets outside, walking out the front doors may not have been the wisest idea...
** Not actually a new plot hole, per se, but a different, worse one than the original game. We know from other games, particularly the ''Outbreak'' series, that Raccoon City had been under a military quarantine for nearly a week by the time Leon and Claire arrived. Now with his new backstory, how did Leon get into the city and not notice the quarantine given the warning he received to stay away? Also, how many hours has he been driving prior to his arrival to the gas station in the beginning? In the original game, he overslept while drunk. According to the director of ''Resident Evil 3'', the reason why Leon and Claire can get past the quarantine is because they coincidentally go through a part of the quarantine that has been abandoned due to zombie attacks. Whether this explanation is still canon to this game is unknown.
** The chopper crash. You get foreshadowing that a chopper's coming in from a corpse's hand radio, but unlike in the original game, there's no Elliot or another idiotic and unlucky cop to accidentally shoot it up and cause it to crash into the RPD. Instead, it just sort of does, with no context as to why. Seeing as there's no aerial enemies in the game, it raises the question of what the hell happened to cause a nose-first dive.
** Many of the boss fights with Birkin occur on both A and B scenarios in spite of the fact that the stories run co-currently. One of the biggest and jarring cases of this is with [[spoiler:G-3, which has Annette: show up to assist the A scenario character and get knocked down by him. Followed by dying differently depending on the A scenario's character. Then show up again apparently minutes sooner to assist the B scenario character, rinse and repeat but with the B scenario character. What makes this even more jarring is in both cases, you witness Birkin mutate from G-2 to G-3!]]
** The storage shed containing the Club Key is a minor case of this, as it's completely barricaded during Claire's routes, yet when Leon drops by during his, it's magically accessible again. This is especially strange since the original A and B routes are supposed to be taking place at the same time.
** The weapon placements in the game make no sense, since their locations are the same for either Leon or Claire, and are always found in the same spots regardless of whether you're playing the A or B scenario. This is despite the two scenarios are supposed to be running concurrently to each other:
*** The Grenade Launcher and Shotgun are both located in the same armory locker regardless of scenario. Same goes for the MQ 11 and Lightning Hawk.
*** Both the Spark Shot and Chemical Flamethrower are found in the same location in the sewers, and on the same plaque, no less.
*** Even the ''mods'' for some of these weapons are located in roughly the same containers, that magically restock with a different item and lock themselves back up when Leon or Claire visit them during a 2nd Run.
** Possibly the biggest offender, other than the example directly above, (although, it also contributes to it) is [[spoiler:Annette's double death. While she does die the same way, the locations are different. Leon's scenario shows her on the other side of a destroyed bridge, dying after shooting Ada. In Claire's scenario, she's in the security room where Sherry is being kept, and dies not long after you meet back up with her.]] It's especially jarring if you play the B scenario which more or less "supposed to" run co-currently with the A scenario.
** How Ada manages to survive her DisneyVillainDeath is a mystery. She obviously didn't have her signature hookshot yet, since it was given to her by Wesker ''after'' managing to escape from NEST in the original. Even assuming that she ''did'' have it all this time due to changes made to the narrative, the game makes no indication of this being the case, as there were several points during her short playable segment that could have benefited greatly from just using it, therefore making the theory highly unlikely to be true. So how did she survive the plunge into the deep elevator shaft to come to Leon's aid later on? Of note is the fact that this was already unexplained in the original game, but in [[AllThereInTheManual Wesker's Report]] he explains that he saved her, as she was working for him at the time. The difference being that the original game had two different ways for Ada to "die", and the other one looked more survivable.


* The [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2Remake 2019 remake]] of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' has become rather infamous for the large number of these it has, even ignoring those ones caused by the producers [[ContinuitySnarl seemingly refusing to maintain a coherent internal narrative]]:
** In the introductory cutscene, a doomed trucker overhears somebody calling into a radio talk show about an encounter with a zombie, seemingly without any idea what it is. Which makes no sense, given that A: the outbreak has been going on for over a week, and B: the military is supposed to have cordoned off the city to keep the infected in and ignorant civilians out.
** Elliot and Marvin act as though they're trapped in the police station and need to find a secret entrance to get out, when the player literally comes in through an unlocked, unblocked front door and front gate to meet them. The intent is probably to convey that simply hitting the streets isn't a safe bet, but the game simply doesn't make that as clear as other games set in Raccoon City have done.
** The inability to retrieve the Club Key as Claire is this. Leon being unable to get the Heart Key is not a case, at least in his "1st Run" game mode; it's in an area that's locked for him but which is unlocked for Claire when she passes through. In comparison, the Club Key is in a small room on the balcony that is barricaded from the outside for Claire, and yet not barricaded for Leon.
** The fact that a character in the "2nd Run" game mode, which correlates to the 1998 version's B Scenario in that it depicts the "concurrent events" of that character, has to face off against the exact same bosses and clear the exact same puzzles that their concurrent "1st Run" character did, is technically more ContinuitySnarl, but the fact that this plot hole only exists in the 2019 remake and not in [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2 the 1998 original]] means it also counts as this.
** Another [=AIPH=]/ContinuitySnarl overlap is how the different weapons and most of their mods are in the ''exact'' same place for both characters, and yet somehow Claire never sees any of Leon's guns or vice-versa.
** Ada surviving her DisneyVillainDeath is technically an example of this; it's established in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvilTheDarksideChronicles'' that Ada didn't get her hookshot until after she escaped from Birkin's lab, which the game supports by having her not use it even in situations where it would be useful. But her "death" in this game consists of being dropped down a massive underground pit and vanishing without a trace, something she probably wouldn't survive without a hookshot. The original [=RE2=] explained this by canonizing the "Claire A/Leon B" storyline, in which Ada's "death" is actually her being mistaken for dead after passing out from shock and internal injuries due to having been slammed into a computer console by Mr. X, whilst the "Leon A/Claire B" storyline, where she falls to her apparent doom, was established as non-canon in subsequent lore.

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