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* ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeShrinks'' was based on a book about a boy who spends a day a few inches tall after having a dream about shrinking. He returns to normal at the end. In the show, it's implied that he's been that way his whole life and it's never explained why.


* In the ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' episode "Trucks!", some trucks deliberately cause an accident because they think Peter Sam is Sir Handel, despite Peter Sam being painted green and Sir Handel being painted blue. This made more sense in the original Railway Series book, where all the Narrow Gage engines were painted the same gray color.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' episode "Trucks!", some trucks (not road vehicles, but what Americans would call freight cars) deliberately cause an accident because they think Peter Sam is Sir Handel, despite Peter Sam being painted green and Sir Handel being painted blue. This made more sense in the original Railway Series book, where all the Narrow Gage engines were painted the same gray color.color.
* ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeShrinks'' was based on a book about a boy who spends a day a few inches tall after having a dream about shrinking. He returns to normal at the end. In the show, it's implied that he's been that way his whole life and it's never explained why.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' episode "Trucks!", some trucks deliberately cause an accident because they think Peter Sam is Sir Handel, despite Peter Sam being painted green and Sir Handel being painted blue. This made more sense in the original Railway Series book, where all the Narrow Gage engines were painted the same gray color.


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** ''AdaptationInducedPlotHole/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians''


** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe [[note]]Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on[[/note]]. Plus, they showed up at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing, making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.

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** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe [[note]]Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on[[/note]]. Plus, they showed up [[DarkestHour at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing, missing]], making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new superhero team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.


** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe (Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on). Plus, they showed up at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing, making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.

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** Season 3 adapts the original ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' story arc from the comics, which involves the Masters of Evil, a team of super-villains, posing as a new super-hero team in order to get people to trust them. In the comic, it actually made sense that nobody recognized them despite the fact they were still using the same powers, since the Masters of Evil had been through several line-up over the course of their career, and the members they used for the impersonation all had super-powers and abilities that were, for the most part, pretty common in the Marvel Universe (Baron [[note]]Baron Zemo[=/=]Citizen V was a BadassNormal like ComicBook/ThePunisher, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} or ComicBook/BlackWidow; Beetle[=/=]MACH-1 had a PoweredArmor like Iron Man, Comicbook/WarMachine or nearly everyone in Iron Man's RoguesGallery; Goliath[=/=]Atlas had SizeShifting like any hero using [[ComicBook/AntMan Pym particles]]; Moonstone[=/=]Meteorite was a FlyingFirepower like ComicBook/MsMarvel and plenty of other characters, and so on).on[[/note]]. Plus, they showed up at a time where most heroes in the Marvel Universe had gone missing, making it easier for them to get accepted with no question, since people were all too happy to have a new team serving as their protectors. In the cartoon, the Avengers have only met the Masters of Evil a few episodes before they show up disguised as the Thunderbolts, the only line-up they have displayed is the one they use while in disguise, very few of the characters with similar super-powers have been introduced, and every Marvel hero is still alive and well, so you are left wondering how the Avengers don't put two and two together when this mysterious new superhero team with the same powers than a super-villain group they recently fought shows up.

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* The ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2Remake'' has become rather infamous for the large number of these it has, even ignoring those ones caused by the producers [[ContinuitySnarl seemingly refusing to maintain a coherent internal narrative]]:
** In the introductory cutscene, a doomed trucker overhears somebody calling into a radio talk show about an encounter with a zombie, seemingly without any idea what it is. Which makes no sense, given that A: the outbreak has been going on for over a week, and B: the military is supposed to have cordoned off the city to keep the infected in and ignorant civilians out.
** Elliot and Marvin act as though they're trapped in the police station and need to find a secret entrance to get out, when the player literally comes in through an unlocked, unblocked front door and front gate to meet them. The intent is probably to convey that simply hitting the streets isn't a safe bet, but the game simply doesn't make that as clear as other games set in Raccoon City have done.
** The rescue copter crashing into the east wing makes no sense in this version; in [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2 the 1998 original]], it was shot down by a police officer who was attacked by zombies and pulled the trigger in his death throes, whilst in the 2019 remake... it just crashes for no apparent reason. It can't even be blamed on an attack by zombie crows, since they were cut from the game.
** The inability to retrieve the Club Key as Claire is this. Leon being unable to get the Heart Key is not a case, at least in his "1st Run" game mode; it's in an area that's locked for him but which is unlocked for Claire when she passes through. In comparison, the Club Key is in a small room on the balcony that is barricaded from the outside for Claire, and yet not barricaded for Leon.
** The fact that a character in the "2nd Run" game mode, which correlates to the 1998 version's B Scenario in that it depicts the "concurrent events" of that character, has to face off against the exact same bosses and clear the exact same puzzles that their concurrent "1st Run" character did, is technically more ContinuitySnarl, but the fact that this plot hole only exists in the 2019 remake and not in [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil2 the 1998 original]] means it also counts as this.

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* In ''WebVideo/ChronoTriggerTheMusical'' Crono arrives at Guardia Castle in 600 A.D. followed by him and Lucca returning through the forest, skipping over Marle suddenly disappearing from the timeline because history has been changed and they need to fix it.


* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanYearOne'' has a slight one. Just like in the comic, when Jim and Barbara Gordon go to meet Bruce Wayne because of Sarah Essex's theory that Bruce is Batman, Bruce does his typical playboy thing and even has a woman spooning him the entire time who he says can't speak English. However, the film gives her another line, where, after the Gordons leave, she complains about their weird party and Bruce tells her to shut up and take her money ''in English''. In the comic, there's nothing to indicate that Bruce ''didn't'' sleep with her or that she spoke a word of English, making it pretty believable that she didn't know he was pulling anything shady, whereas in the movie, it's kind of weird that she would keep quiet after this weirdness or wouldn't peace together that Bruce is Batman.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanYearOne'' has a slight one. Just like in the comic, when Jim and Barbara Gordon go to meet Bruce Wayne because of Sarah Essex's theory that Bruce is Batman, Bruce does his typical playboy thing and even has a woman spooning him the entire time who he says can't speak English. However, the film gives her another line, where, after the Gordons leave, she complains about their weird party ''in English'' and Bruce tells her to shut up and take her money ''in English''. money. In the comic, there's nothing to indicate that Bruce ''didn't'' sleep with her or that she spoke a word of English, making it pretty believable that she didn't know he was pulling anything shady, whereas in the movie, it's kind of weird that she would keep quiet after this weirdness or wouldn't peace together that Bruce is at least connected to Batman.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanYearOne'' has a slight one. Just like in the comic, when Jim and Barbara Gordon go to meet Bruce Wayne because of Sarah Essex's theory that Bruce is Batman, Bruce does his typical playboy thing and even has a woman spooning him the entire time who he says can't speak English. However, the film gives her another line, where, after the Gordons leave, she complains about their weird party and Bruce tells her to shut up and take her money ''in English''. In the comic, there's nothing to indicate that Bruce ''didn't'' sleep with her or that she spoke a word of English, making it pretty believable that she didn't know he was pulling anything shady, whereas in the movie, it's kind of weird that she would keep quiet after this weirdness or wouldn't peace together that Bruce is Batman.

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* "{{WebVideo/Nightfall}}": Eve mentions that her boyfriend printed out his boarding pass "last night", but the premise of the original story, "Literature/Nightfall1941", is that night only ever occurs during [[TotalEclipseOfThePlot the eclipse]] that occurs for a few hours every two thousand, forty-nine years. (Listen at 1:22) If night occurs on a regular basis, then the eclipse shouldn't cause the panic/chaos that it does.


* In Ralph Bakshi's ''WesternAnimation/TheLordOfTheRings'', during the Council of Elrond, Elrond never explains why the Ring must be brought to Mount Doom (i.e. because the fires where it was forged are the only ones hot enough to melt it). Of course, this is easy to skim over if you already know that from reading [[Literature/LordOfTheRings the book]], but if you haven't, it doesn't make a lot of sense, especially since Elrond has already said: "We cannot keep it, we cannot destroy it" a moment earlier.

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* In Ralph Bakshi's ''WesternAnimation/TheLordOfTheRings'', during the Council of Elrond, Elrond never explains why the Ring must be brought to Mount Doom (i.e. because the fires where it was forged are the only ones hot enough to melt it). Of course, this is easy to skim over if you already know that from reading [[Literature/LordOfTheRings ''[[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings the book]], book]]'', but if you haven't, it doesn't make a lot of sense, especially since Elrond has already said: "We cannot keep it, we cannot destroy it" a moment earlier.


** Theoretically, it could be that this Iceman is an entirely separate character, explaining the "snowman" look and age discrepancy - after all, it's incredibly common for mutants to have similar powers/themes across all X-Men media. This, however, raises the question of why we never learn what happened to the original Iceman and no one ever mentions him.


* In ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'', Vegeta [[DeathByAdaptation kills Ginyu]] rather than sparing him like he did in the source material. This eventually brings up a plot hole when the Ginyu Forces gather together at King Kai's planet yet Captain Ginyu himself is not present as he doesn't die in the canon. This will also produce an even bigger plothole should Team Four Star decide to adapt ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', since its version of ''Film/DragonBallZResurrectionF'' has Ginyu make a grand return by [[GrandTheftMe body-jacking]] one of Freeza's new minions. (Though they ''could'' always have Sorbet revive him as well when he wishes Freeza back).

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* In ''WebVideo/DragonBallZAbridged'', Vegeta [[DeathByAdaptation kills Ginyu]] rather than sparing him like he did in the source material. This eventually brings up a plot hole when the Ginyu Forces gather together at King Kai's planet yet Captain Ginyu himself is not present as he doesn't die in the canon. This will also produce an even bigger plothole should Team Four Star decide to adapt ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', since its version of ''Film/DragonBallZResurrectionF'' has Ginyu make a grand return by [[GrandTheftMe body-jacking]] one of Freeza's new minions. (Though they ''could'' always have Sorbet revive him as well when he wishes Freeza back).

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