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* In ''VideoGame/{{Carrion}}'', several entrances from the [[HubLevel Frontier area]] to other areas require abilities gained from earlier levels, such as [[InvisibilityCloak Photokinesis]] to bypass the door sensors that shut the entrance to the Leviathan Reef Base if tripped.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Carrion}}'', several entrances from the [[HubLevel Frontier area]] to other areas require abilities gained from earlier levels, such as [[InvisibilityCloak Photokinesis]] from the Botanical Gardens to bypass the door sensors that shut the entrance to the Leviathan Reef Base if tripped.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Carrion}}'', several entrances from the [[HubLevel Frontier area]] to other areas require abilities gained from earlier levels, such as [[InvisibilityCloak Photokinesis]] to bypass the door sensors that shut the entrance to the Leviathan Reef Base if tripped.


** As a series hallmark, almost every dungeon in the series from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link to the Past]]'' onward will have puzzles that can't be solved without the item found in their respective dungeon and bosses will probably need you to that item to beat them. In addition, one dungeon's item may be required to enter the next dungeon (or even sometimes the section of TheOverworld it lies in).

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** As a series hallmark, almost every dungeon in the series from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link to the Past]]'' onward will have puzzles that can't be solved without the item found in their respective dungeon and bosses will probably need you to use that item to beat them. In addition, one dungeon's item may be required to enter the next dungeon (or even sometimes the section of TheOverworld it lies in).


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[[folder: Platformer]][[folder:Platformer]]



[[folder: Roguelike]]

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** Similarly, Lift is used maybe once or twice to get into Magma Rock, which [[VideoGame/GoldenSunTheBrokenSeal the first]] used quite a bit more.

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** Similarly, Lift is used maybe once or twice to get into Magma Rock, which [[VideoGame/GoldenSunTheBrokenSeal [[VideoGame/GoldenSun2001 the first]] used quite a bit more.


* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were {{Utility Weapon}}s necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Every entry that requires [=HMs=] has Cut as mandatory for the main story[[note]]in ''Black and White'', every other HM is only used to reach optional items or locations[[/note]], with Surf and Strength being close behind. However, you can obtain Pokémon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I. Many players use a designated HM slave or two to carry the required moves, as while some are powerful attacks you'd want on your Pokémon (Surf is one of the most powerful Water-type moves in the game), others are near worthless (in battle, Flash was a 70% accuracy status move during Gens I-III, with much better moves being able to do the exact same thing).
** From the seventh generation onwards, you no longer need to teach your Pokémon HM moves. This trope still remains in play, however, as you now receive separate items or abilities (such as Ride Pokémon) that accomplish the same goals without using up moveslots.

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* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were {{Utility Weapon}}s necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Every entry that requires [=HMs=] has Cut as mandatory for the main story[[note]]in ''Black and White'', every other HM is only used to reach optional items or locations[[/note]], with Surf and Strength being close behind. However, you can obtain Pokémon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I. Many players use a designated HM slave or two to carry the required moves, as while some are powerful attacks you'd want on your Pokémon (Surf is one of the most powerful Water-type moves in the game), others are near worthless (in battle, Flash was a 70% accuracy status move during Gens I-III, with much better moves being able to do the exact same thing).
thing). On top of that, you can't just overwrite them with another move; you need to talk to a special NPC you generally meet late in the game in order to delete any HM moves.[[note]]Said NPC didn't even ''exist'' in Gen I, meaning whoever you taught the HM move in those games was forever stuck with it.[[/note]]
** From the seventh generation onwards, you no longer need to teach your Pokémon HM moves. This trope still remains in play, however, as you now receive separate items or abilities (such as Ride Pokémon) that accomplish the same goals without using up moveslots. Meanwhile, former HM moves became TM moves that can be freely taught and removed from a Pokémon's moveset.


* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were {{Utility Weapon}}s necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Every entry that requires HMs has Cut as mandatory for the main story, with Surf and Strength being close behind. However, you can obtain Pokémon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I. Many players use a designated HM slave or two to carry the required moves, as while some are powerful attacks you'd want on your Pokémon (Surf is one of the most powerful Water-type moves in the game), others are near worthless (in battle, Flash was a 70% accuracy status move during Gens I-III, with much better moves being able to do the exact same thing).

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* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were {{Utility Weapon}}s necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Every entry that requires HMs [=HMs=] has Cut as mandatory for the main story, story[[note]]in ''Black and White'', every other HM is only used to reach optional items or locations[[/note]], with Surf and Strength being close behind. However, you can obtain Pokémon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I. Many players use a designated HM slave or two to carry the required moves, as while some are powerful attacks you'd want on your Pokémon (Surf is one of the most powerful Water-type moves in the game), others are near worthless (in battle, Flash was a 70% accuracy status move during Gens I-III, with much better moves being able to do the exact same thing).


* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Surf is the most obvious, with Cut and Rock Smash being the other two main offenders. However, you can obtain Pokemon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I.

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* During the first six generations of ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games, HM moves were {{Utility Weapon}}s necessary to reach plot-specific areas. Each game has certain cities and localities you can only reach once you have taught one of your Pokémon a certain HM and gained the Gym badge that allows you to use it outside of battle. Every entry that requires HMs has Cut as mandatory for the main story, with Surf is the most obvious, with Cut and Rock Smash Strength being the other two main offenders. close behind. However, you can obtain Pokemon Pokémon that know the HM moves by trading instead of finding the HM, allowing for some minor SequenceBreaking, such as skipping the S.S. Anne in Gen I. Many players use a designated HM slave or two to carry the required moves, as while some are powerful attacks you'd want on your Pokémon (Surf is one of the most powerful Water-type moves in the game), others are near worthless (in battle, Flash was a 70% accuracy status move during Gens I-III, with much better moves being able to do the exact same thing).



** Examples from the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch installments: ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndEevee'' has gyms giving unique requirements to enter their challenges, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSwordAndShield'' has some monsters in the Wild Area being unable to be captured until you have enough badges to do so.

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** Examples from the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch installments: ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndEevee'' has gyms giving unique requirements to enter their challenges, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSwordAndShield'' has some monsters limits what creatures you are allowed to capture in the [[BeefGate Wild Area being unable to be captured until you have enough Area]] depending on the amount of badges to do so.you have.


* ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy'': The axe, torch, hammer, ladder, and three kinds of boots will be obtained throughout the fourth game, and it's deliberately patterned after ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''. You even get achievements called "Used Cut", "Used Flash", "Used Rock Smash", and "Used ...Ladder?". Non-player characters at Goldenbrick Resort in ''[=EBF4=]'' call the stepladder "legendary" since there is only one in the entire world.

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* ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy'': Used in ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy4'' and ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy5''. The axe, torch, hammer, ladder, and three kinds of boots will be obtained throughout the fourth game, and it's deliberately games. Deliberately patterned after ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''. ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''.:
** ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy4'':
You even get achievements called "Used Cut", "Used Flash", "Used Rock Smash", and "Used ...Ladder?". Non-player characters at Goldenbrick Resort in ''[=EBF4=]'' call the stepladder "legendary" since there is only one in the entire world.world.
** ''VideoGame/EpicBattleFantasy5'': which adds an additional number of items such as the shovel and a second type of hammer, but also the items that are necessary only for extra loot, like the Cloud Boots.

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** Examples from the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch installments: ''VideoGame/PokemonLetsGoPikachuAndEevee'' has gyms giving unique requirements to enter their challenges, and ''VideoGame/PokemonSwordAndShield'' has some monsters in the Wild Area being unable to be captured until you have enough badges to do so.


* Downplayed in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', where you must levitate to reach the upper levels of Telvanni mage towers. If you haven't bothered to train your Alteration skill, this can be a hindrance to advancing in many quests. Luckily, potions of levitation are found in abundance and several items enchanted with levitation spells are given to you through quests. (Including one given to you as part of the main quest ''right'' before you're required to enter Telvanni towers for the first time.) You can also brew your own potions or make your own enchanted items.
* To access the summit of the Throat of the World in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', you need to learn a specific Shout in order to part the blizzard that will otherwise rapidly drain your health. Said Shout is only learned as part of the main questline, barring you from the area until you make a certain amount of progress.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
**
Downplayed in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'', where you must levitate to reach the upper levels of Telvanni mage towers. If you haven't bothered to train your Alteration skill, this can be a hindrance to advancing in many quests. Luckily, potions of levitation are found in abundance and several items enchanted with levitation spells are given to you through quests. (Including one given to you as part of the main quest ''right'' before you're required to enter Telvanni towers for the first time.) You can also brew your own potions or make your own enchanted items.
* ** To access the summit of the Throat of the World in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', you need to learn a specific Shout in order to part the blizzard that will otherwise rapidly drain your health. Said Shout is only learned as part of the main questline, barring you from the area until you make a certain amount of progress.


* Seen in the ''Franchise/{{Onimusha}}'' series: the [[VideoGame/Onimusha2SamuraisDestiny second]] and [[VideoGame/Onimusha3DemonSiege third]] games have certain doors protected by a colored, tumor-like Genma called Mozun. In order to unlock said areas, you have to find the right Oni Weapon and use it (examining the Mozun will always tell you what kind of elemental Oni Weapon you need). The fourth game, ''[[VideoGame/OnimushaDawnOfDreams Dawn of Dreams]]'' has certain levels containing special locks or iron doors or walkways that can only be used by one of your party members.

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* Seen in the ''Franchise/{{Onimusha}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Onimusha}}'' series: the [[VideoGame/Onimusha2SamuraisDestiny second]] and [[VideoGame/Onimusha3DemonSiege third]] games have certain doors protected by a colored, tumor-like Genma called Mozun. In order to unlock said areas, you have to find the right Oni Weapon and use it (examining the Mozun will always tell you what kind of elemental Oni Weapon you need). The fourth game, ''[[VideoGame/OnimushaDawnOfDreams Dawn of Dreams]]'' has certain levels containing special locks or iron doors or walkways that can only be used by one of your party members.

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* The metroidvania ''VideoGame/LaMulana'' has plenty of this, but also has a [[GuideDangIt particularly evil subversion]]: the [[spoiler: Scalesphere]] can only be obtained after passing through a [[spoiler: pool of water]] that [[StupidityIsTheOnlyOption drains your health due to you not having the item]]. This is actually ''more'' likely to trip up experienced metroidvania players, who will assume the item needs to be found elsewhere before proceeding (unless they're the type to attempt SequenceBreaking on the first run).


-->-- A conversation between a constructor of a SupervillainLair and his boss in ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation,'' ''{{VideoGame/Strider}}''

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-->-- A conversation between a constructor of a SupervillainLair and his boss in ''WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation,'' ''{{VideoGame/Strider}}''
''VideoGame/Strider2014''



* ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' for the NES: Flashing red wall? You need the Magnetic Boots to walk up it. [[GrimyWater HP-draining water]]? Requires the Aqua Boots, which you must WallJump to reach. Uncrossable spike pit? Jumping upgrade required to proceed. Low passageway? You need to acquire the sliding ability.
** Returns with a vengeance in the 2014 remake. Closed-off vents? Get that SlideAttack! Icy-blue spinning doors? Need the [[AnIcePerson Ultra-Cold Cypher]] to freeze them. Yellow-glowing doors? Must use the [[FlamingSword Explosive Cypher]] to burn through. Suspiciously weak grates in the ground? Gotta pound 'em with [[DeathFromAbove Downstrike]]! Purple magnetically-locked doors? Guess this Magnetic Cypher will come in handy!

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* ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'' for the NES: ''VideoGame/{{Strider}}'':
** The [[Manga/{{Strider}} NES game]]:
Flashing red wall? You need the Magnetic Boots to walk up it. [[GrimyWater HP-draining water]]? Requires the Aqua Boots, which you must WallJump to reach. Uncrossable spike pit? Jumping upgrade required to proceed. Low passageway? You need to acquire the sliding ability.
** Returns with a vengeance in the 2014 [[VideoGame/Strider2014 2014]] remake. Closed-off vents? Get that SlideAttack! Icy-blue spinning doors? Need the [[AnIcePerson Ultra-Cold Cypher]] to freeze them. Yellow-glowing doors? Must use the [[FlamingSword Explosive Cypher]] to burn through. Suspiciously weak grates in the ground? Gotta pound 'em with [[DeathFromAbove Downstrike]]! Purple magnetically-locked doors? Guess this Magnetic Cypher will come in handy!


* As a series hallmark, almost every dungeon in the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link to the Past]]'' onward will have puzzles that can't be solved without the item found in their respective dungeon and bosses will probably need you to that item to beat them. In addition, one dungeon's item may be required to enter the next dungeon (or even sometimes the section of TheOverworld it lies in). ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'' averts this trope by having all key items in a store waiting to be purchased, while ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild Breath of the Wild]]'' averts it by giving you every essential puzzle-solving ability in the introductory area.
*** A common design is to use this trope to hide a BrokenBridge. For example, in [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle of Ages]], the second dungeon gives Link Roc's Feather, which gives him the ability to jump. To get to the third dungeon, he is required to have an NPC build him a raft to access the island the dungeon is on. There are some pits Link must jump over to access raft-builder's house, requiring Roc's Feather. If Link leaves the second dungeon after obtaining Roc's Feather but without completing the rest of the dungeon, he will be unable to obtain the raft, despite being able to talk to the NPC. Most players will never see this BrokenBridge, as leaving the dungeon half way through would not occur to them.

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
**
As a series hallmark, almost every dungeon in the ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' the series from ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkToThePast A Link to the Past]]'' onward will have puzzles that can't be solved without the item found in their respective dungeon and bosses will probably need you to that item to beat them. In addition, one dungeon's item may be required to enter the next dungeon (or even sometimes the section of TheOverworld it lies in). in).
**
''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaALinkBetweenWorlds A Link Between Worlds]]'' averts this trope by having all key items in a store waiting to be purchased, while ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild Breath of the Wild]]'' averts it by giving you every essential puzzle-solving ability in the introductory area.
*** ** A common design is to use this trope to hide a BrokenBridge. For example, in [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle of Ages]], the second dungeon gives Link Roc's Feather, which gives him the ability to jump. To get to the third dungeon, he is required to have an NPC build him a raft to access the island the dungeon is on. There are some pits Link must jump over to access raft-builder's house, requiring Roc's Feather. If Link leaves the second dungeon after obtaining Roc's Feather but without completing the rest of the dungeon, he will be unable to obtain the raft, despite being able to talk to the NPC. Most players will never see this BrokenBridge, as leaving the dungeon half way through would not occur to them.them.
** Notably averted in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI''. All of Hyrule, save for two screens[[note]]screens in which you need to have the Raft to access[[/note]], can be explored from the start. [[BeefGate Doing so, however, is likely to get you killed.]]
** The trope is prominent in the remake, ''BS Zelda no Densetsu'', where it interestingly combines with BrokenBridge. Certain obstacle-clearing items or events only appear or occur during certain broadcast weeks (for example, the Candle is needed in order to access the western portion of the map, but is only sold after the first week). One could wait until a later week and try to sequence break, but this defeats the purpose anyways, and the player only having one hour a week, or certain items becoming [[PermanentlyMissableContent unobtainable]].

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