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* The children's book series ''Literature/FrannyKStein'' was about a seven-year-old girl who was a mad scientist and the misadventures she got into when her experiments went wrong.

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* In the ''Literature/ExtremeMonsters'' book series, the titular group of extreme sports-playing monsters had a mad scientist named Doc as their coach.

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* Mandragora from ''Website/TheCrewOfTheCopperColoredCupids'' may be an alchemist (who dresses like it, torch-lit laboratory, alembics and all), but hereally acts more like a mad scientist, complete with bringing monsters back to life with cries of having unlocked [[EvilIsHammy the secret! of life! ''itself!'']]. Pythe jokingly refers to Mandragora as "the Governor's pet mad scientist".

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* In ''Literature/CastleHangnail'', of the former masters of Castle Hangnail was one, complete with the electrodes and the screams of "It's alive!"


* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'':

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* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'':''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':

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* The [[TheHeavy main villains]] in ''Literature/{{Caliphate}}'' are surprisingly ''not'' Islamic fanatics, but a trio of American scientists that defected to the titular Islamic state to destroy America using a biological weapon they developed. This alone makes them qualify by default, but the one who trulY fits the trope best than the others is Dr. O'Meara, a sadistic, sexual predator with [[PaedoHunt a taste for children]].

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* Dr Reeper (at least before his [[spoiler: HeelFaceTurn]]) and Professor Zuzubin in ''Literature/GeorgesSecretKeyToTheUniverse''. Alioth Merak is arguably this as well.


* While the Mad Scientist might seem quintessentially modern, he's probably OlderThanSteam. The inspiration for both Mary Shelley's novel ''{{Frankenstein|sMonster}}'' and the adaptations which distorted Frankenstein himself into a Mad Scientist came from a much older literary and popular tradition about Mad ''Alchemists'', and their blasphemous, yet entertaining, obsessions with the creation of homunculi and the secrets of eternal life. The most well-known remnant of the old "Mad Alchemist" trope today is the {{Faust}} myth, and its literary adaptations in Marlowe's ''Theatre/DoctorFaustus'' and Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''.

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* While the Mad Scientist might seem quintessentially modern, he's probably OlderThanSteam. The inspiration for both Mary Shelley's novel ''{{Frankenstein|sMonster}}'' and the adaptations which distorted Frankenstein himself into a Mad Scientist came from a much older literary and popular tradition about Mad ''Alchemists'', and their blasphemous, yet entertaining, obsessions with the creation of homunculi and the secrets of eternal life. The most well-known remnant of the old "Mad Alchemist" trope today is the {{Faust}} Myth/{{Faust}} myth, and its literary adaptations in Marlowe's ''Theatre/DoctorFaustus'' and Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''.


* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, the Alchemists' Guild are also {{Magitek}} mad scientists. Inverted with the character of Jeremy Clockson, who has the detachment from reality and dangerous obsession of the typical Mad Scientist because (most of the time, and in a very specialised way) he's ''saner'' than normal people.
** {{The Igor}}s of the ''Discworld'' series. Though typically the assistants of a Mad Scientist, they're known to conduct their own experiments, such as growing noses with feet, and their own special version of "self improvement". Though to be fair, the Igors in general are remarkably GenreSavvy -- they know their place in the chain, and how to react when that chain is shaken. In fact, the clan foists off the most "modern" variant of their clan upon the Night Watch in an attempt to cease the corruption: that is to say, Mr. "Noses with Feet". Similarly, in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', an Igor working for vampires revolts at their innovations and revives the old master -- not so much reviving the GoodOldWays as the [[EvenEvilHasStandards Moderately Less Odious Old Ways]].

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* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, the series:
** The
Alchemists' Guild are also {{Magitek}} mad scientists. scientists.
**
Inverted with the character of Jeremy Clockson, who has the detachment from reality and dangerous obsession of the typical Mad Scientist because (most of the time, and in a very specialised way) he's ''saner'' than normal people.
people. Not that it makes much difference to the end result.
** {{The Igor}}s of the ''Discworld'' series. Though Discworld are typically the assistants of a to Mad Scientist, they're Scientists, but are known to conduct their own experiments, such as growing noses with feet, and have their own special version of "self improvement". Though to be fair, the Igors in general are remarkably GenreSavvy -- they know their place in the chain, and how to react when that chain is shaken. In fact, at one point, the clan foists off the their most "modern" variant of their clan upon (Mr. "Noses with Feet") on the Night Watch in an attempt to cease end the corruption: that is to say, Mr. "Noses with Feet".corruption they feel he brings. Similarly, in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', an Igor working for vampires revolts at their innovations and revives the old master -- not so much reviving the GoodOldWays as the [[EvenEvilHasStandards Moderately Less Odious Old Ways]].



** Bergholt Stuttley "Bloody Stupid" Johnson may qualify, aside from his architectural and landscaping mishaps he made a mail-sorter with a wheel that has pi as exactly 3, it started churning out mail from the future and alternate universes until the post master smashed it.

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** Bergholt Stuttley "Bloody Stupid" Johnson may qualify, qualify; aside from his architectural and landscaping mishaps mishaps, he made a mail-sorter with a wheel that has had pi as exactly 3, it 3. It started churning out mail from the future and alternate universes until the post master postmaster smashed it.



* While the Mad Scientist might seem quintessentially modern, he's probably OlderThanSteam. The inspiration for both Mary Shelley's novel ''{{Frankenstein|sMonster}}'' and the adaptations which distorted Frankenstein into a Mad Scientist came from a much older literary and popular tradition about Mad ''Alchemists'', and their blasphemous, yet entertaining, obsessions with the creation of homunculi and the secrets of eternal life. The most well-known remnant of the old "Mad Alchemist" trope today is the {{Faust}} myth, and its literary adaptations in Marlowe's ''Theatre/DoctorFaustus'' and Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''.\\
\\
An interesting fact is that the 1910 silent film ''[[Film/{{Frankenstein 1910}} Frankenstein]]'' features a scene of monster's creation that is highly relevant to an alchemical procedure of palingenesis (re-formation of a once-living organism from its ashes or from its severed parts by heating). No other film adaptation involves this trace.
** Victor Frankenstein, as originally conceived in Mary Shelley's novel, was not quite a Mad Scientist. Although he sees himself as a descendant of Mad Alchemists, Shelley makes his character more rounded and his mental instability more subtly portrayed. However, within decades wildly popular nineteenth-century melodrama theatre adaptations recast him as a cackling Mad Alchemist.
*** While he's not a MadScientist throughout the novel, he certainly is one when he's actually working on bringing his creature to life:

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* While the Mad Scientist might seem quintessentially modern, he's probably OlderThanSteam. The inspiration for both Mary Shelley's novel ''{{Frankenstein|sMonster}}'' and the adaptations which distorted Frankenstein himself into a Mad Scientist came from a much older literary and popular tradition about Mad ''Alchemists'', and their blasphemous, yet entertaining, obsessions with the creation of homunculi and the secrets of eternal life. The most well-known remnant of the old "Mad Alchemist" trope today is the {{Faust}} myth, and its literary adaptations in Marlowe's ''Theatre/DoctorFaustus'' and Goethe's ''Theatre/{{Faust}}''.\\
\\
''Theatre/{{Faust}}''.
**
An interesting fact is that the 1910 silent film ''[[Film/{{Frankenstein 1910}} Frankenstein]]'' features a scene of the monster's creation that is highly relevant to an alchemical procedure of palingenesis (re-formation of a once-living organism from its ashes or from its severed parts by heating). No other film adaptation involves this trace.
** Victor Frankenstein, as originally conceived in Mary Shelley's novel, was not quite a Mad Scientist. Although he sees himself as a spiritual descendant of Mad Alchemists, Shelley makes his character more rounded and his mental instability is more subtly portrayed. However, within decades wildly popular nineteenth-century melodrama theatre adaptations recast him as a cackling Mad Alchemist.
*** ** While he's not a MadScientist throughout the novel, he certainly is one when he's actually working on bringing his creature to life:



* Creator/AlfredBester's "Literature/TheMenWhoMurderedMohammed", along with its protagonist Professor Henry Hassell of [[ExtranormalInstitute Unknown University]], gives Ampere and Boltzman as examples of RealLife "mad professors".

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* Creator/AlfredBester's "Literature/TheMenWhoMurderedMohammed", "The Men Who Murdered Mohammed", along with its protagonist Professor Henry Hassell of [[ExtranormalInstitute Unknown University]], gives Ampere and Boltzman as examples of RealLife "mad professors".



* Creator/ArthurMachen's ''The Inmost Light'' written in 1894 contains a rather horrific version of this trope.
** There's one in ''Literature/TheGreatGodPan''. While the novel seems desperate to make him slightly sympathetic, at least to a modern reader he comes off as a monster. Yeah, practice some experimental brain surgery with a teenaged girl completely infatuated with you, and clearly incapable of truly informed consent. What could go wrong?

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* Creator/ArthurMachen's Creator/ArthurMachen:
**
''The Inmost Light'' Light'', written in 1894 1894, contains a rather horrific version of this trope.
** There's another one in ''Literature/TheGreatGodPan''. While the novel seems desperate to make him slightly sympathetic, at least to a modern reader he comes off as a monster. Yeah, practice some experimental brain surgery with a teenaged girl completely infatuated with you, and clearly incapable of truly informed consent. What could go wrong?



* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' introduce Qwi Xux, an incredibly brilliant scientist who designed the laser for the Death Star, the World Destroyers, the Sun Crusher and a number of other dangerous creations. Unlike many others in this trope her extremely guarded upbringing (she was raised by Imperials in an oppressive cram school where the price for failure was your hometown being obliterated) has caused her to develop a very naive and innocent view of her creations, having been led to believe they were intended for industrial applications (the Death Star would blow up a massive asteroid which the World Destroyers would then be able to harvest for materials, etc.).

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* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' introduce ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'':
**
Qwi Xux, an incredibly brilliant scientist who scientist, designed the laser for the Death Star, the World Destroyers, the Sun Crusher and a number of other dangerous creations. Unlike many others in fitting this trope trope, her extremely guarded upbringing (she was raised by Imperials in an oppressive cram school where the price for failure was your hometown being obliterated) has caused her to develop a very naive and innocent view of her creations, having been led to believe they were intended for industrial applications (the Death Star would blow up a massive asteroid which the World Destroyers would then be able to harvest for materials, etc.).



* Most of the villains in the ''Literature/MaximumRide'' series. Often hilariously overdone, as with [[ThoseWackyNazis ter Borcht]], who is a thinly disguised {{Expy}} of Josef Mengele in personality, Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger in voice/outrageous accent.
* In Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs's ''[[Literature/JohnCarterOfMars The Master Mind of Mars]]'', Ras Thavas. Who actually makes his living selling his skills and doesn't care about the rest of the world.
** Although he later tries to give up his evil ways, Ras Thavas has trouble [[EvilCannotComprehendGood understanding the 'rules'.]]

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* Most of the villains in the ''Literature/MaximumRide'' series. Often hilariously overdone, as with [[ThoseWackyNazis ter Borcht]], who is a thinly disguised {{Expy}} of Josef Mengele in personality, and Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger in voice/outrageous accent.
* In Creator/EdgarRiceBurroughs's ''[[Literature/JohnCarterOfMars The Literature/JohnCarterOfMars tends to run into his share of crazy scientists:
** In ''The
Master Mind of Mars]]'', Mars'', Ras Thavas. Who actually Thavas makes his living selling his skills and doesn't care about the rest of the world.
**
world. Although he later tries to give up his evil ways, Ras Thavas has trouble [[EvilCannotComprehendGood understanding the 'rules'.“rules”.]]



* Literature/TheUltraViolets owe their superpowers to [[AbsentMindedProfessor Absent Minded]] TeenGenius Candace and her questionable experiments.
** The Fascination Lab and [=BeauTek=] seem to hire them by the batch. Though the latter is the "evil" company, [=FLab=] isn't afraid of exploring the potential of some freaky, questionable science. (They even have a literal Highly Questionable Tower, for Pete's sake.)

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* Literature/TheUltraViolets owe their superpowers to [[AbsentMindedProfessor Absent Minded]] TeenGenius Candace and her questionable experiments.
** The
experiments. And the Fascination Lab and [=BeauTek=] seem to hire them by the batch. Though the latter is the "evil" company, [=FLab=] isn't afraid of exploring the potential of some freaky, questionable science. (They even have a literal Highly Questionable Tower, for Pete's sake.)



* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos''

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* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos''''Literature/JourneyToChaos'':


* [[TheDestroyer Remo Williams]] has encountered mad scientists, for example Dr. Judith White, who mutated herself into tiger/homo sapien hybrid.

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* [[TheDestroyer [[Literature/TheDestroyer Remo Williams]] has encountered mad scientists, for example Dr. Judith White, who mutated herself into tiger/homo sapien hybrid.


* Common in ''Literature/PleaseDontTellMyParentsImASupervillain''. Most super-intellects have difficulty controlling their power, since the human brain isn't designed to hold that kind of knowledge. This results in a number of impractical and downright stupid designs, such as putting a self-destruct on an otherwise perfectly normal smelter. The main character, Penny, is a mad scientist who's a bit better at this than most, and has invented technology strong enough to challenge adult heroes when she's only thirteen.

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* Common in ''Literature/PleaseDontTellMyParentsImASupervillain''. Most super-intellects have difficulty controlling their power, since the human brain isn't designed to hold that kind of knowledge. This results in a number of impractical and downright stupid designs, such as putting a self-destruct on an otherwise perfectly normal smelter. The main character, Penny, is a mad scientist who's a bit better at this than most, and has invented technology strong enough to challenge adult heroes when she's only thirteen.thirteen - though like many often lapses into a fugue state, waking to find herself holding a new invention of unknown function and cackling madly. Her father, by contrast, is a controlled enough mad scientist and a good enough "real" scientist that he can sometimes translate mad science inventions into things people without superpowers can understand. A different variety has a separate superpower that enables or enhances their creations - her classmate Cassie primarily[[ShockAndAwe shoots lightning]], but can instinctively create devices she can operate with her powers, while another is primarily a mad scientist and was unaware she had a separate power until examination revealed her invention lacked a motive force without her holding it.


** Herbert West, mentioned above in the FilmOfTheBook (albeit updated to later in the 20th Century.)

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** Herbert West, mentioned above in the FilmOfTheBook (albeit updated of ''Literature/HerbertWestReanimator'', whose quest to later in the 20th Century.)hold back death takes him down dark paths.


* Creator/HPLovecraft definitely had more than one Mad Scientist character.
** The stories ''From Beyond'', like ''At the Mountains of Madness'', ''The Dreams in the Witch House'' and ''The Shadow Out of Time''. While all of the above feature scientists, only the one in ''From Beyond'' is a genuine MadScientist. Though some of the others GoMadFromTheRevelation, they never adapt MadScientist mannerisms, instead getting more realistic nervous breakdowns.

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* Creator/HPLovecraft definitely had more than one Mad Scientist character.
Creator/HPLovecraft:
** The stories ''From Beyond'', like ''At Crawford Tillinghast in "From Beyond", who messes with the Mountains nature of Madness'', ''The Dreams in the Witch House'' reality and ''The Shadow Out of Time''. While all of the above feature scientists, only the one in ''From Beyond'' is a genuine MadScientist. Though some of the others GoMadFromTheRevelation, they never adapt MadScientist mannerisms, instead getting more realistic nervous breakdowns.doesn't seem bothered when it leads to his servants being eaten by an EldritchAbomination.


* Subverted to some extent in the George R.R. Martin-edited ''WildCards'' books. There are Mad Scientists a plenty, on both hero and villain sides. Or at least folks who have been infected with the wild card virus who are now determined to build androids, giant mecha suits and all manner of mad-sciencey devices. The kicker is that the inventions they create ''really are'' just piles of unworkable junk, and the particular power they have developed is the [[MagicPoweredPseudoscience ability to make their crazy inventions work]]. Any attempt to analyze and reproduce the devices prove to be fruitless and show that there is no way they should function in the first place.

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* Subverted to some extent in the George R.R. Martin-edited ''WildCards'' ''Literature/WildCards'' books. There are Mad Scientists a plenty, on both hero and villain sides. Or at least folks who have been infected with the wild card virus who are now determined to build androids, giant mecha suits and all manner of mad-sciencey devices. The kicker is that the inventions they create ''really are'' just piles of unworkable junk, and the particular power they have developed is the [[MagicPoweredPseudoscience ability to make their crazy inventions work]]. Any attempt to analyze and reproduce the devices prove to be fruitless and show that there is no way they should function in the first place.

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