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* FootBathTreatment:
** ''Putty Tat Trouble'' concludes with Sylvester the cat and his rival in their respective apartments shivering and sneezing with their feet in washpans of hot water. Both cats had fallen through the ice on a frozen pond, courtesy of Tweety and his trusty ice pick.
** Referenced in ''The Unmentionables''; as Rocky and Muggsy prepare CementShoes for a blindfolded Bugs Bunny, he complains "Look, fellas, how many times do I have to tell ya? I haven't got a cold!"

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* EvolvingMusic: A whole book could be written on the subject, given how long the series ran in theaters, but basically, the scores mirrored the changes to popular music and film music.
** When the series began, the scores by Frank Marsales, Norman Spencer, and Bernard Brown were heavily influenced by ragtime and foxtrot. By the time Carl Stalling arrived, the cartoons began to have jazz, big band, and swing-influenced soundtracks, with song cues accentuating the on-screen action more common. Milt Franklyn continued this tradition, albeit with a few less song cues and more experimentation in chords and instrumentation. His successor, Bill Lava, was clearly influenced by horror and crime drama films, and that was reflected in his cartoon scores. He also took influence from early rock 'n roll music, as heard in cartoons like "Banty Raids" and "Cool Cat".

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** "The Unmentionables": Again, played for laughs: Bugs joins Rocky and Mugsy for their long prison sentence because he lost the key to the handcuffs that he arrested them in.


* [[EverythingsBetterWithPenguins Everything's Better With Pen-goo-ins]]: "Frigid Hare", "8 Ball Bunny", "The Penguin Parade."

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* [[EverythingsBetterWithPenguins Everything's Better With Pen-goo-ins]]: %%* EverythingsBetterWithPenguins: "Frigid Hare", "8 Ball Bunny", "The Penguin Parade."Parade".%%ZCE
* EvilLivingFlames: Throughout "Porky the Fireman", portions of the fire Porky is helping to fight come alive and antagonize the firefighters. One fiery figure steals a bucket of water from Porky and dumps it on his head, while another mocks a team of firemen as they try to hose it down. At the end, after the building has burnt to the ground, one last anthropomorphic flame peeks from the rubble and gets doused by dozens of firemen at once... before popping back up from the ashes, knocking all the firemen down with a hose used like a gatling gun, and victoriously beating its chest as the screen fades to black.


* {{Flanderization}}: Different directors often focussed on different aspects of a character, most notably with Daffy, Bugs, Elmer Fudd, and Porky.

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* {{Flanderization}}: Different directors often focussed focused on different aspects of a character, most notably with Daffy, Bugs, Elmer Fudd, and Porky.


** Some of Creator/ChuckJones' more experimental shorts, like "WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys" or "Now Hear This!"

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** Some of Creator/ChuckJones' more experimental shorts, like "WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys" or "Now Hear This!""WesternAnimation/NowHearThis!"



* EarTrumpet: "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRua64ACGFg&NR=1 Now Hear This]]" is about an old man who finds a new ear trumpet in place of his old and worn-out one. He is overjoyed to have a new shiny trumpet, but it is, in fact, Satan's lost horn, and it turns the old man's world into a synesthetic, nightmarish acid trip sequence.

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* EarTrumpet: "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRua64ACGFg&NR=1 Now Hear This]]" "WesternAnimation/NowHearThis" is about an old man who finds a new ear trumpet in place of his old and worn-out one. He is overjoyed to have a new shiny trumpet, but it is, in fact, Satan's lost horn, and it turns the old man's world into a synesthetic, nightmarish acid trip sequence.


** The WesternAnimation/PrivateSnafu shorts (and some of the WartimeCartoons in general) played up the wilder and violent elements of the series even more--the Snafu shorts, because they were privately screened for soldiers and thus avoided the scrutiny of the Hays Office, even get away with very risque content like a woman doing a striptease (and scantily dressed woman in general, something pretty uncommon in the main series Looney Tunes), some (mild) on-screen swearing, and other content that would never have been allowed in public theaters of the day. If Looney Tunes was TheSimpsons of it's time, then Snafu was practically their answer to ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''.

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** The WesternAnimation/PrivateSnafu shorts (and some of the WartimeCartoons in general) played up the wilder and violent elements of the series even more--the Snafu shorts, because they were privately screened for soldiers and thus avoided the scrutiny of the Hays Office, even get away with very risque content like a woman doing a striptease (and scantily dressed woman in general, something pretty uncommon in the main series Looney Tunes), some (mild) on-screen swearing, and other content that would never have been allowed in public theaters of the day. If Looney Tunes was TheSimpsons of it's its time, then Snafu was practically their answer to ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''.

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* DidntThinkThisThrough: You know, maybe that giant inflatable duck ("Daffy Duck and the Dinosaur") wasn't such a hot idea after all.


** ''Each Dawn I Crow'' ends with [[spoiler:John Rooster finding out that Elmer was not planning on using his axe to kill him for dinner after all, but instead to chop a tree. Unfortunately, the tree falls on John, and Elmer ends up having him for dinnr after all, though he's still alive as he's being boiled]].

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** ''Each Dawn I Crow'' ends with [[spoiler:John Rooster finding out that Elmer was not planning on using his axe to kill him for dinner after all, but instead to chop a tree. Unfortunately, the tree falls on John, and Elmer ends up having him for dinnr dinner after all, though he's still alive as he's being boiled]].


** This even got a {{Lampshade}} during an AffectionateParody of ''InvasionOfTheBodySnatchers''.

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** This even got a {{Lampshade}} during an AffectionateParody of ''InvasionOfTheBodySnatchers''.''Film/InvasionOfTheBodySnatchers''.


* DigitalDestruction: The Golden Collection sets have gained some notoriety among some animation buffs for usage of the infamous DVNR process, resulting in oversaturated colors, oversharpened lines (which ruins the look of the cels) or even flat out erased artwork (particularly noticable in the restoration of "The Big Snooze" on Vol. 2), and fuzzy moire patterns.

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* DigitalDestruction: The Golden Collection sets have gained some notoriety among some animation buffs for usage of the infamous DVNR process, resulting in oversaturated colors, oversharpened lines (which ruins the look of the cels) or even flat out erased artwork (particularly noticable in the restoration of "The Big Snooze" on Vol. 2), and fuzzy moire patterns. Cartoons released prior to August 1948 would usually suffer the worst from this process, as the rights were owned by various other companies from the late 50s-90s. [[note]]Explaination: Warner Bros. sold the color LT/MM shorts off to Associated Artists Productions in 1956, and the cartoons would soon be owned by Creator/UnitedArtists, then Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer, and finally [[UsefulNotes/TedTurner Turner Entertainment Co.]] before WB regained them in 1996 due to parent company Time Warner acquiring Turner.[[/note]] Because of this, at least 1 cartoon from the Golden Collection sets would suffer badly from DVNR.


* ExcusePlot: The cartoons never rely on anything more than very basic setups and conflicts for their stories, which went hand in hand with their fast paced slapstick comedy, which was the real meat of the cartoons entertainment. Creator/ChuckJones, even explained why they did this in his biography "Chuck Amuck";

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* ExcusePlot: The With very few exceptions, Story is ''always'' a formality in the theatrical cartoons never rely on anything and amounts to little more than very basic setups set ups for each film. The conflict in the series peak year shorts are always a result of either an individual characters actions or friction between the characters personalities and conflicts for their stories, which went hand in hand with their fast paced slapstick comedy, which was the real meat of the cartoons entertainment. Creator/ChuckJones, even explained why they did this very rarely from an outside conflict or influence. Creator/ChuckJones stressed in his biography "Chuck Amuck";Amuck" that the characters personalities were always given top priority over the stories;


* DependingOnTheArtist: Because the directors were also in charge of doing the key characters poses, the specific designs would vary from unit to unit. Most noticeable with the Jones and Clampett units. With the latter, the personal style of individual animators, especially Rod Scribner, would stand out.
* DependingOnTheWriter: Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck under Creator/BobClampett and Creator/TexAvery were manic antagonists. As portrayed by Creator/ChuckJones' writer Michael Maltese, they were almost platonic opposites, Bugs being the cool winner to Daffy's jealous loser. Warren Foster, writer for directors Creator/BobMcKimson and Creator/FrizFreleng, portrayed Bugs as a more proactive version of the Jones-Maltese model and Daffy as a toned down [[ScrewySquirrel screwball]].
* DerangedAnimation:
** Pretty much any cartoon directed by Creator/BobClampett. Special mention goes to "WesternAnimation/PorkyInWackyland".
** Some of Creator/ChuckJones' more experimental shorts, like "WesternAnimation/TheDoverBoys" or "Now Hear This!"



* DownerEnding: The Creator/TexAvery short "Circus Today" ends with the diver falling to his death leading the band to play "Taps".

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* DownerEnding: Quite a few shorts have these, though they are often played for laughs.
**
The Creator/TexAvery short "Circus Today" ends with the diver falling to his death leading the band to play "Taps"."Taps".
** ''Each Dawn I Crow'' ends with [[spoiler:John Rooster finding out that Elmer was not planning on using his axe to kill him for dinner after all, but instead to chop a tree. Unfortunately, the tree falls on John, and Elmer ends up having him for dinnr after all, though he's still alive as he's being boiled]].
** Quite a few Foghorn Leghorn cartoons end with him being outsmarted by whoever he's in conflict with, whether he's being dragged away to be eaten by Henery Hawk, starts being cooked by the weasel, gets married to Miss Prissy when he really didn't want to marry her, [[spoiler:tied up, dressed in drag, and presumed married to a beatnik rooster]] in ''Banty Raids'', [[spoiler: taken away by the farmer when he gives an ultimatum that either he or the newborn rooster go]] in ''Broken Leghorn'', and a number of other issues. Though he does tend to come out on top as often as he doesn't.
** ''Porky Pig's Feat'' ends with [[spoiler: Daffy and Porky still locked up in the hotel to which they can't afford to pay the bill, and Bugs Bunny is locked up as well]].
** Hardly any of Chuck Jones' Daffy Duck cartoons (except ''A Pest In The House'' and ''Rabbit Fire'') have happy endings for the character, even before Jones turned him into a loser/bad guy.



** "To Beep or Not to Beep" has has Wile E. Coyote falling off a cliff, with a cactus landing on him after the fact. The pain launches him into the air and his mouth covers the whole screen (in red) as he screams in pain.

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** "To Beep or Not to Beep" has has Wile E. Coyote falling off a cliff, cliff where a bridge had just been, with a cactus landing on him after the fact. The pain {{pain|powered leap}} launches him into the air and his mouth covers the whole screen (in red) as he screams in pain.pain.
** "Stupor Duck," with Daffy on a rocket ship heading for the moon.



* FaceDoodling: "Daffy Doodles"

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* FaceDoodling: It's the theme of "Daffy Doodles"Doodles": Daffy Duck travels throughout town painting moustaches on every advertisement he can find, until he finds Porky Pig as a policeman trying to catch him, after which he starts painting moustaches on him and everybody else in the city.
* FadingIntoTheNextSong: Bill Lava being fond of ending his shorts in the 1962-1964 era with an "E" note so that they could smoothly transition into the "Merrily We Roll Along" closing music, many of the episodes aired during that time do so.


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** In "Feed The Kitty," Marc Antony the bulldog sprays his mouth with whipped cream to pretend he has rabies in order to scare off his mistress and rescue Pussyfoot the kitten from a bowl of cookie batter. It doesn't work.
* FallingIntoJail: In ''Hare Lift'', Yosemite Sam bails out of the crashing aeroplane carrying his bag of stolen loot and laughing maniacally. He stops laughing as he lands in an open-topped car full of unamused police officers.


** The WesternAnimation/PrivateSnafu shorts (and some of the WartimeCartoons in general) played up the wilder and violent elements of the series even more--the Snafu shorts, because they were privately screened for soldiers and thus avoided the scrutiny of the Hays Office, even get away with very risque content like a woman doing a striptease (and scantily dressed woman in general, something pretty uncommon in the main series Looney Tunes), some (mild) on-screen swearing, and other content that would never have been allowed in public theaters of the day. If Looney Tunes was TheSimpsons of it's time, then Snafu was practically their answer to SouthPark.

to:

** The WesternAnimation/PrivateSnafu shorts (and some of the WartimeCartoons in general) played up the wilder and violent elements of the series even more--the Snafu shorts, because they were privately screened for soldiers and thus avoided the scrutiny of the Hays Office, even get away with very risque content like a woman doing a striptease (and scantily dressed woman in general, something pretty uncommon in the main series Looney Tunes), some (mild) on-screen swearing, and other content that would never have been allowed in public theaters of the day. If Looney Tunes was TheSimpsons of it's time, then Snafu was practically their answer to SouthPark.''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''.


* {{Flynning}}: In "The Scarlet Pumpernickel", Daffy as an Creator/ErrolFlynn-type swashbuckling action hero engages in this kind of sword duel with Sylvester as a Basil Rathbone-type villain.

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* {{Flynning}}: In "The Scarlet Pumpernickel", Daffy as an Creator/ErrolFlynn-type swashbuckling action hero engages in this kind of sword duel with Sylvester as a Basil Rathbone-type Creator/BasilRathbone-type villain.

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