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!! "Yen-Shen" features these tropes:

* AlphaBitch: Jin and Jun-Li, Yeh-Shen's stepmother and stepsister. Jin is a bitter woman whose physical appearance deteriorated through years of hard work; Jun-Li is completely spoiled and lazy, and her hateful jealously is fueled upon realizing she does not have the same gifts or virtues as Yeh-Shen.

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!! "Yen-Shen" "Yeh-Shen" features these tropes:

* AlphaBitch: Jin and Jun-Li, Yeh-Shen's stepmother and stepsister. Jin is a bitter woman whose physical appearance deteriorated through years of hard work; Jun-Li is completely spoiled and lazy, and her hateful jealously jealousy is fueled fuelled upon realizing she does not have the same gifts or virtues as Yeh-Shen.



* CheatersNeverProsper: Many ways by Jin and Jun-Li. First, Jin -- perhaps sensing that Yeh-Shen is more beautiful than Jun-Li, and thus will get the most desirable, richest man -- banishes Yeh-Shen from going to the festival to meet a potential suitor, but it fails to stop Yeh-Shen from going. Later, when Yeh-Shen is revealed (in Jin's presence) to be the owner of the golden slipper (left behind at the festival), Jin appeals to the king that the slipper had been stolen from another maiden, but the king is neither fooled nor amused and has both Jin and Jun-Li banished from the kingdom. (In the end, these cheaters get their just deserts, being crushed to death when their cave is demolished in an earthquake.)

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* CheatersNeverProsper: Many ways by Jin and Jun-Li. First, Jin -- perhaps sensing that Yeh-Shen is more beautiful than Jun-Li, and thus will get the most desirable, richest man -- banishes bans Yeh-Shen from going to the festival to meet a potential suitor, but it fails to stop Yeh-Shen from going. Later, when Yeh-Shen is revealed (in Jin's presence) to be the owner of the golden slipper (left behind at the festival), Jin appeals to the king that the slipper had been stolen from another maiden, but the king is neither fooled nor amused and has both Jin and Jun-Li banished from the kingdom. (In the end, these cheaters get their just deserts, being crushed to death when their cave is demolished in an earthquake.)



* WickedStepmother: Jin is notable for being the ORIGINAL WickedStepmother. This is the one of the earliest Cinderella stories, after all.

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* WickedStepmother: Jin is notable for being the ORIGINAL WickedStepmother. This is the one of the earliest Cinderella stories, after all.


* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [[http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,]] [[DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]] English translations nearly always make the character male, implying him to be an incarnation of her dead father.

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* AmbiguousGender: Whether Probably not intentionally so, but whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [[http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,]] [[DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]] English translations nearly always make the character male, implying him to be an incarnation of her dead father.


* WickedStepmother: Jin is notable for being the ORIGINAL WickedStepmother. This is the earliest Cinderella story, after all.

to:

* WickedStepmother: Jin is notable for being the ORIGINAL WickedStepmother. This is the one of the earliest Cinderella story, stories, after all.

Added DiffLines:

* LostInTranslation: The story opens saying that Yeh-Shen's father had two wives. While this is usually translated to imply he was in a polyamorous marriage with Yeh-Shen's real mother and stepmother, it's possible this was meant to mean "he was married twice."
** Yeh-Shen's father is described as a cave chief. Since the text suggests Yeh-Shen's family lives in a house, complete with a garden, it's been suggested that this means he is the chief of a mountainous region, not literal cave-people.
** The stepmother and stepsister ultimately die by "flying stones." Whether this means they died in a rock slide or the king ordered them stoned to death is up for debate.

Added DiffLines:

** The original story trumps this by saying Yeh Shen looks like a being from Heaven in her festival clothes.


* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [[http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,]] [DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]

to:

* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [[http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,]] [DecompositeCharacter [[DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]]] English translations nearly always make the character male, implying him to be an incarnation of her dead father.


Added DiffLines:

* YoungestchildWins: Subverted. Yeh Shen is the elder daughter. The fact that she should be the daughter preparing for marriage is possibly one of the reasons her stepmother hates her.


* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,] [DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]

to:

* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [http://blog.[[http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,] fairies,]] [DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]

Added DiffLines:

* AmbiguousGender: Whether the fairy is male or female is lost in translation, even to modern Chinese. [http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_73afff960102vo5x.html One Chinese picture book from the 1950's notably divides the being into two fairies,] [DecompositeCharacter one male and one female.]


Added DiffLines:

* FairyGodmother: The fairy who reveals the bone's magic to Yeh Shen seems to be the precursor to Cinderella's fairy godmother.


%%* WickedStepMother

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%%* WickedStepMother* WickedStepmother: Jin is notable for being the ORIGINAL WickedStepmother. This is the earliest Cinderella story, after all.


* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman - "You are the most beautiful creature on earth," is what the King, enchanted by Yeh-Shen, tells her (at least on the ''CBS Storybreak'' animated version) while dancing with her at the Spring Ball.

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* WorldsMostBeautifulWoman - WorldsMostBeautifulWoman: "You are the most beautiful creature on earth," is what the King, enchanted by Yeh-Shen, tells her (at least on the ''CBS Storybreak'' animated version) while dancing with her at the Spring Ball.


* TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper

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* %%* TheGirlWhoFitsThisSlipper



* SpiritAdvisor
* RagsToRoyalty

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* %%* SpiritAdvisor
* %%* RagsToRoyalty



* WickedStepMother

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* %%* WickedStepMother


Donna Jo Napoli's young adult novel ''Bound'' is a retelling of this story. The story later became familiar with modern audiences as an animated adaptation on ''CBS Storybreak''. Titled "Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China," the story originally aired in April 1985 and was narrated in its original airing by Bob Keeshan (formerly ''CaptainKangaroo''). Ten years later, Series/ThePuzzlePlace retold the story in the episode "Going by the Book".

to:

Donna Jo Napoli's young adult novel ''Bound'' is a retelling of this story. The story later became familiar with modern audiences as an animated adaptation on ''CBS Storybreak''. Titled "Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China," the story originally aired in April 1985 and was narrated in its original airing by Bob Keeshan (formerly ''CaptainKangaroo'').''Series/CaptainKangaroo''). Ten years later, Series/ThePuzzlePlace retold the story in the episode "Going by the Book".


'''"Yeh-Shen"''' 叶限 (or "Ye Xian") is a Chinese FairyTale known to be one of the oldest variations of "Literature/{{Cinderella}}". The story first appears during the 9th Century in ''Miscellaneous Morsels'' from Youyang.

to:

'''"Yeh-Shen"''' "Yeh-Shen" 叶限 (or "Ye Xian") is a Chinese FairyTale known to be one of the oldest variations of "Literature/{{Cinderella}}". The story first appears during the 9th Century in ''Miscellaneous Morsels'' from Youyang.


Donna Jo Napoli's young adult novel ''Bound'' is a retelling of this story. The story later became familiar with modern audiences as an animated adaptation on ''CBS Storybreak''. Titled "Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China," the story originally aired in April 1985 and was narrated in its original airing by Bob Keeshan (formerly ''CaptainKangaroo'').

to:

Donna Jo Napoli's young adult novel ''Bound'' is a retelling of this story. The story later became familiar with modern audiences as an animated adaptation on ''CBS Storybreak''. Titled "Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China," the story originally aired in April 1985 and was narrated in its original airing by Bob Keeshan (formerly ''CaptainKangaroo''). Ten years later, Series/ThePuzzlePlace retold the story in the episode "Going by the Book".

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